Who is having the last laugh now


senior labourI have to declare a very strong case of  interest I have more time for the following Members of Parliament  Harriet Harman, Jack Dromey, and Patricia Hewitt than  the Tories let alone a coalition between LibDems and Labour. Conservatives say they want to be known as the “workers’ party”. Yet for working families across the country this couldn’t be further from the truth. You can’t pose as the “workers’ party” when you’ve made working people £1,600 worse off while cutting taxes for the wealthiest. A re-brand with no substance won’t fool anyone  the reality is that David Cameron’s record speaks for itself:

Working people are on average more than £1,600 a year worse off under David Cameron.

bombshell-2-1GLThe Tory-led Government have cut taxes for people earning more than £150,000 while everyone else is worse off.

The number of young people claiming unemployment benefits for over a year has doubled.

Under David Cameron, for the first time more than half of households in poverty are in work.

More than five million people are paid less than the living wage. With a record like this, how can the Tories claim to be the “workers’ party”? It’s clear that David Cameron has made his choice: standing up for a privileged few, not for working families.

Check out this youtube:

labourlogoIt is the Labour Party that has always been the workers’ party the clue is in the name. That’s why we’ll strengthen the minimum wage, increase free childcare for working parents and introduce a compulsory jobs guarantee for young people unemployed for over a year.

The Tories have never had the interests of working families at heart. Funded by millionaires and then cutting their taxes: with David Cameron’s record as leader they’d be better off renaming themselves the millionaires’ party.

hatedimagesIt’s not surprising that the coalition has purposefully forgotten that our social security system evolved to address poverty and huge social inequality. It was never intended as a punitive, patronising Tory “moral crusade”. The system does not benefit the poor any longer, and we need to look at the fact that the Tories have turned what was meant as a sensible, civilised, well meaning system of support for anyone that may need it into a tool of class warfare, which is no longer fit for its original purpose.

Not only have the Tories perpetuated deception on a rather grand scale, which encourages a deeply patronising attitude to those who live in poverty, and justifies their punishment and persecution of us, they have caused absolute poverty, pain, suffering, loss of dignity and death.

Only Tories could stamp their corrosive brand of elitism on civilised social support mechanisms and turn them into a “survival of the ‘fittest'” game.

I’m sure many will recall the New Deal for Communities was another of the previous Labour government’s flagship policies a national regeneration scheme. It had a “re-democratising democracy” aim built into these policies, and New Deal was closely overlapped with their flagship Every Child Matters, too. Joined up thinking at its very best. It was launched in 1998. The main goal of the programme was to reduce disadvantages in the poorest areas- increase social inclusion, and it placed an emphasis on a commitment to involving local people in a wide range of policy decisions, including regeneration – by focusing on four issues: unemployment, poor health, crime and education. Local participation was a key to achieving positive outcomes in these areas.

Other issues such as improvement to the physical environment were secondary to these main priorities. My own post was on various issues  and about tackling the risk of crime and social exclusion, which meant a lot of inter-agency work, such as in schools, and with the police, and group work with young people, it required acknowledge of the key cause of crime, and building our project provision for young people around that. Just the fact there WAS provision for them in itself made a massive difference to their lives, and significantly reduced crime and “ASB” at a local level. In a way, by focusing on needs in the community, and inclusion, the reduction in offending happened by itself, as a consequence of a broad and participatory approach, in my own and other people’s experience.

Labour’s neighbourhood renewal policies achieved a great deal, and made a big difference to deprived communities and those who were socially excluded under the previous Thatcher and Major governments. They established a better- informed and better co-ordinated approach to tackling both spatial and phenomenological inequalities. Outcomes improved in priority areas that were targeted employment, crime, health, education, housing and physical environments. The trend towards widening neighbourhood disparities was reversed in many areas. In general, evidence strongly suggests the programmes offered outstanding positive social outcomes and excellent value for money.

‘When Labour created the NHS, in the face of austerity and Conservative ­opposition, we placed on the Statute Book a legal duty requiring national government to provide a comprehensive health service free at the point of delivery for all British citizens.

It was a foundation stone of ­political accountability. And it was abolished by the very first line of David Cameron’s Health Act last year.

This duty to provide health services is now left with “local commissioning groups”, organisations of which few people have ever heard and no one can vote out of office.

Instead of having responsibility to provide services, ministers are now expected only to “promote” them. And we’re now beginning to see the consequences – David Cameron and his ministers routinely dodging responsibility for the problems they have created.

The crisis in  A&E? Blame the GPs. Ambulance queues doubled? It must be the fault of the local hospital. Rationing of vital treatments like cataract operations and hip ­replacements? It’s a matter for your local commissioning group.

This is the Government’s ABC of blame anyone but Cameron.

The next Labour government will start to put NHS values, not Tory values, back at the heart of it.

We would repeal David Cameron’s Health Act and reinstate the ­Secretary of State’s duty to provide a comprehensive health service.

We will stop the fragmentation and the privatisation of our NHS so we keep it as a truly national service and begin rebuilding the ethos of our NHS – so that its first 65 years are not the last.’ Ed Miliband.

‘When Labour created the NHS, in the face of austerity and Conservative opposition, we placed on the Statute Book a legal duty requiring national government to provide a comprehensive health service free at the point of delivery for all British citizens.

It was a foundation stone of ­political accountability. And it was abolished by the very first line of David Cameron’s Health Act last year.

This duty to provide health services is now left with “local commissioning groups”, organisations of which few people have ever heard and no one can vote out of office.

Instead of having responsibility to provide services, ministers are now expected only to “promote” them. And we’re now beginning to see the consequences  David Cameron and his ministers routinely dodging responsibility for the problems they have created.

The crisis in A&E blame the GPs. Ambulance queues doubled? It must be the fault of the local hospital. Rationing of vital treatments like cataract operations and hip ­replacements? It’s a matter for your local commissioning group.

This is the Government’s ABC of blame Anyone but Cameron.

The next Labour government will start to put NHS values, not Tory values, back at the heart of it.

We would repeal David Cameron’s Health Act and reinstate the ­Secretary of State’s duty to provide a comprehensive health service.

We will stop the fragmentation and the privatisation of our NHS so we keep it as a truly national service and begin rebuilding the ethos of our NHS – so that its first 65 years are not the last.’ Ed Miliband .

Nick Clegg has been branded “patronising” by one of his own MPs over his support for benefit cuts. Sarah Teather, a former minister, said the system was leaving people “destitute”. Her criticism comes after Clegg accused the Archbishop of Westminster, the Most Rev Vincent Nichols, of exaggerating the effects of the coalition’s welfare reforms. Teather said Clegg’s intervention was not “very helpful” or “well informed” as she backed the Archbishop’s stance.

Oh lets not forget Conservative Party chairman Grant Shapps has encouraged his followers on Twitter to retweet an image of Ed Miliband in which the Labour leader is mocked for being the “millionaire son of a Marxist academic, whose entire life has been spent in political jobs”.

Given Miliband is indeed the son of Marxist academic Ralph, does live in a multi-million-pound property in north London and did serve as a special adviser to Harriet Harman and Gordon Brown prior to becoming a Labour MP, you could argue that it is a legitimate, even canny, line of attack from the Tories. Especially given how most polls suggest the party is vulnerable to the charge that it is ‘out of touch’ with the concerns of ordinary people.

But did Shapps check with his superiors before tweeting – specifically, the prime minister and the chancellor of the exchequer?

The Conservative Party leader has had little life experience outside of Conservative Party politics. David Cameron (who is worth almost £4m) landed his first job out of university with the Conservative Research Department (CRD) in 1988 (allegedly with the help of Buckingham Palace).

He went on to work as.. wait for it.. a special adviser (spad) for the then Tory chancellor, Norman Lamont, and was caught on camera standing behind his boss on ‘Black Wednesday’ in 1992. After Lamont lost his job, Cameron became a spad to another Conservative cabinet minister: the then home secretary Michael Howard. The only job the prime minister has had outside party politics is as ‘director of corporate’ affairs for Carlton Communications, between 1994 and 2001 (when he became a member of parliament). That’s real world experience, eh?

Cameron, incidentally, isn’t the son of a Marxist academic – his late father was a stockbroker.

As for George Osborne (who is worth around £4.5m), he had a handful of part-time jobs after graduating from Oxford – including re-folding towels at Selfridge’s – before joining the Conservative Research Department in 1994, later becoming head of its political section. Osborne went on to work as… yes, you guessed it.. a spad for Douglas Hogg, John Major’s agriculture secretary during the BSE crisis. Next, he became a speechwriter and political secretary for then Tory leader William Hague, before quitting to run for parliament in 2001.

Osborne’s dad, incidentally, wasn’t a Marxist academic either – Sir Peter Osborne is the multimillionaire founder of upmarket wallpaper designer Osborne & Little and a baronet, too.

So has the Conservative Party chairman unwittingly legitimised attacks on politicians’ parents, finances and career backgrounds? And do the Tories have more to lose on this than Labour?

A Labour Government would streamline local public services to save money, Chris Leslie, the shadow Chief Treasury Secretary, will pledge today.

Options include “leaner” commissioning deals for health and social care; locating magistrates and county courts on the same site; greater collaboration between the emergency services; merging police forces; scrapping elected police and crime commissioners and councils “sharing” senior staff and services such as street cleaning, recycling and ground maintenance.

“We are looking not only at where efficiencies are achievable, but how services could be reconstituted to release the cashable savings that are now required,” Mr Leslie will tell the Social Market Foundation in his first major speech in his post.

“Reform is worse than pointless if it does not improve the experience of the user and ends up costing money rather than saving money.”

Accusing the Coalition of wasting money on “botched reforms” such as its top-down NHS reorganisation, he will say that the centre-left must embrace the goal of balancing the nation’s books because “the foundation of successful public service provision is the sound stewardship of public finances”.’

“We MUST vote these vile creatures out in 2015” (Conservatives and LibDems) Vote Labour in 2014 in European, and Local Government Elections and 2015 Local Government and General Elections 

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