Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)


IMG_2041By my calculation after the general elections should there is a marjory or another coalition pack with conservative the jaws of doom will be implemented as the coalition would love to see a health insurance based in place. It’s no wonder why they are being supported by hedge funds in return for a piece of the pie in return to have parts NHS and Social services being partly privatise and more zero hour contracts will increase under conservative or conservative coalition.

Don’t be surprised the next time you turn up to the NHS or use social services they will ask to see your health insurance. With this in mind the nation will not recognize our public services as we once knew it. Naturally people are concerned about our public services which were the vanguard of our community.

Intriguingly this what the Conservatives say:

Chancellor George Osborne says he will put an extra £2bn into frontline health services across the UK, which he described as a “down payment” on a plan drawn up by NHS bosses calling for an extra £8bn a year above inflation by 2020. In England, everyone would be able to see a GP seven days a week by 2020. Recruit 5,000 more doctors.

Libdems say:

An extra £1bn for the NHS every year, to be funded by – amongst other things – making higher earners pay more tax on their shares. Half of this will go towards mental health. People who need therapy for conditions such as depression will be guaranteed treatment within 18 weeks. For young patients experiencing psychosis for the first time treatment will be provided within two weeks of being referred by a GP. This is all going to happen from April, with more mental health targets to follow if the Lib Dems return to government. Wants a cross-party review of the future of NHS funding.

UKIP say:

An extra £3bn per year in NHS funding paid for by quitting the EU and through “middle management” cuts. Keep NHS free at the point of delivery. Stop any further use of PFI, and encourage local authorities to buy out their PFI contracts early where it is affordable to do so. Ensure all visitors and migrants who have been here for fewer than five years have NHS-approved medical insurance as a condition of entry to UK, with £200m of the £2bn saved to be spent on ending hospital parking charges in England. Bring back state-enrolled nurses and return powers to matrons. Monitor and Care Quality Commission to be replaced with elected county health boards. Stop spending £90m a year on gastric band and breast enhancement operations.

The Greens say:

Funding to be diverted away from centralised facilities towards community healthcare, illness prevention and health promotion. Stop privatisation. Abolish prescription charges. Dedicated NHS Tax to go direct to the health service. Ban proactive recruitment of non-British NHS staff from overseas. A complete ban on the promotion of tobacco and alcohol products, including sponsorship.

Recently I wrote to my Member of Parliament regards to TTIP and the reply I received:

Backbench Business Debated on 15 January, Labour believes it is right that this important issue is debated in Parliament and they agree that those proposals deserve proper scrutiny at both a UK and EU level. Labour supports trade agreements which can bring significant benefits through boosting trade and growth, securing and creating jobs, and bringing down costs and extending choice for consumers.

The transatlantic Trade and investment Partnership (TTIP) trade agreement between the US, the world’s largest economy, and the largest single market, the EU, has the potential to bring significant to bring significant benefits.

IMG_1997 The US is the UK’s biggest export market and likewise the UK economy attracts a significant level of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) from the Atlantic. That’s why Labour supports the principles behind those negotiations and recognizes that more and better trade is good for the UK.

However there are some concerns that Labour has in four areas:

Remember the wise words of the founder of NHS Nye Bevan

Public services:

We share the concerns about the impact that TTIP could have on public services encouraging commercialisation, particularly in NHS. Labour believes that NHS and all public services need to be more, not less, integrated. That is why we believe that the NHS should be exempted from the agreement. Other countries have sought to exempt areas from the agreement but this Government has not done this. Labour will continue to press for exemption.

Investor State Dispute Resolution (USDS):

There is a major concern that ISDS provisions could hinder our plans to reverse the privatisation of the NHS as it could result in those companies seeking compensation for loss of potential earnings. We believe that it is a right of governments to able to legislate in the public interest and this should be protected effectively in any disputes resolution mechanism. Labour will be arguing the government to call for far greater transparency around exclusion for legislation in the public interest, like the NHS.

IMG_2045 Standards:

The benefits of any treaty must filter down to employees and consumers. Treaties can cement and even increase labour, consumer, environmental, and safety standards. Concerns have been raised that TTIP could reduce standards, Labour will only support an agreement that avoids a race to the bottom and promotes decent jobs and growth and would safeguard standards.

Non-inclusion of the US State:

A significant stumbling block has been raised that the US states are not covered by the agreement and therefore procurement will not open up but not to the same extent in the US. This is important because significant procurement spend in the US is at the State level.

Great I got a response from my member of parliament there is still some concerns I still have which is:

If the Conservatives or a coalition pack with UKIP in the event do win a majority or a hung parliament  how fast will they implement TTIP which will have the knock on effect on our treasured public services both in local government and our NHS?

Who will hold the budget for NHS or Social Services and how will it be shared equally ensure we have a decent NHS and IMG_2050social Care which will be fit for purpose?

Many believe that one of the biggest prizes of the agreement for transnationals looking to expand will be the NHS. When it was first established, the NHS was set up on the basis of social solidarity everyone contributed to the cost of providing the NHS through taxes, and in return healthcare was provided by the state and available for those who needed it, when they needed it. But the Health and Social Care Act (2012) and the regulations for implementing it (especially Section 75) have changed the fundamental nature of the NHS. By fragmenting the NHS, opening it up to competition law and turning the NHS into a market in which private companies can nhscompete to get NHS funding for patient services, the HSC Act has turned the NHS from a social into a commercial activity.

Public services are normally protected from FTAs, However, because the NHS is now, in part, provided by commercial companies,
it will only be protected from TTIP if it is explicitly excluded from the treaty (which currently it is not).

gl17If agreed, TTIP will change the whole emphasis of NHS health care: the priority will become the rights of transnational organisations rather than the care of patients. TTIP will give transnationals the right to bid for government spending, including on health. It will put severe restrictions on the ability of the UK government to control costs (e.g. of medicines) and to regulate any transnational companies that provide health services.

I personally would not trust Conservatives, Libdems, UKIP or the Green Party with our beloved NHS and public services for the many as most has shown their hands on what they want to do to our treasured services as it won’t be at the point of need.

HarryLeslieSmithAsk yourself this question why is it important to save our NHS and remember the powerful speech by Harry Leslie Smith who said:

“As I stand here today, my heart is with all of those people from my generation who didn’t make it past childhood, didn’t get an education, grow as individuals, marry, raise a family and enjoy the fruits of retirement because they died needlessly and too early in another era of austerity,” he said.

“But my heart is also with the people of the present, who, because of welfare cuts and austerity measures, are struggling once more to make ends meet, and whose futures I fear for.”

“I am not a politician, a member of the elite or a financial guru, but my life is your history and we should keep it that way.

“So say it loud and say it clear in this hall and across this country, Mr Cameron keep your mitts off my NHS.”

Our free NHS is for all. Not for the few shout for it, fight for it, vote for it.

 

 

 

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3 responses to “Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)

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