Has the tables turned on Cameron


Here is a is a bit of satire worthwhile watching:

For me Billy Bragg sums it up you either like him or loathe him, he does have a point when he said:

A week on from Jeremy Corbyn’s election as Labour leader and it’s striking how not a single national newspaper has come out to support him. The usual suspects have gone for his throat, but even the left of centre Guardian and Observer have filled their pages with articles repeating the received wisdom that he cannot win an election. The Tories victory in May seems to have convinced the media that the British electorate will only vote for centre-right candidates.

jghjngyrThis complacent assumption led the Labour Party to open their leadership election to party supporters. When Ed Miliband won in 2010 with the support of the unions, the Blairites in the Labour high command moved swiftly to ensure that this could never happen again. To dilute the left-wing power of the unions, the party opened the process to anyone willing to pay £3, because everyone knows that Labour supporters are more moderate than union members and will happily vote for a centrist candidate. For the Blairites, this was a terrible miscalculation.

All through the leadership campaign and since Corbyn’s election, New Labour’s big guns have been telling us that he is simply unelectable, that Labour cannot win from the left. They cite Ed Miliband’s defeat as proof of their argument. But did the Tories actually win because Labour was too left-wing?

The distorting effect of our first past the post electoral system handed the Tories an accidental majority. A party needs 326 seats for an overall majority in the Commons and the Conservatives won 331. Had just 429 Conservative voters in five marginal constituencies opted to put a cross against the name of the Tories’ main rival instead, then David Cameron would not have won a majority.jdfbfuj

Of course, this doesn’t mean that Ed Miliband would now be in No.10 had those votes gone the other way. We’d more likely be saddled with another Tory/LibDem coalition, because it was the collapse of the Liberal Democrat vote that handed the election to the Tories. In south west England, the perception of the LibDems as a left wing alternative to the Tories helped them to win 15 seats in 2010. When they then chose to put the Tories into power by joining the coalition, voters in the south west deserted them and they lost all 15 seats.

The Tories didn’t win a majority because Labour were seen as moving to the left, they won because the LibDems moved to the right and were heavily punished by their voters for doing so.

Cameron’s outright victory was an anomaly, brought about by a first past the post system unable to cope with more than three parties vying for power. It has allowed the Tories and their allies in the media to act as if the whole country is behind them and their austerity agenda, whereas the real picture is much more ambiguous.

We are in the midst of a process of great change sparked by the Crash of 2008, the ramifications of which may rumble on beyond the 2020 election. The British people no longer fully trust the political class to rule in the best interests of the majority of voters who put them into government. Furthermore, globalisation has left many feeling that they no longer have any control over their lives.jhbnfgj

Those who make a living diagnosing the ailments of our body politic seem baffled by the symptoms that keep flaring up. The huge turn out in the Scottish referendum; the rise of UKIP to become the third largest party in terms of votes; the almost complete wipe out of the unionist parties in Scotland by the SNP; the landslide victory of Jeremy Corbyn: all these suggest that if you give people something to vote for, something that offers genuinely transformative change, they will come out and grab it with both hands.

Will our political class wake up and smell the coffee, realising that people want something more than just the narrow political dialogue that they have determinedly stuck to over the past twenty years? Or will they sleep walk into the EU referendum with the same complacent attitude towards the ‘moderate’ British electorate? To do so could be their greatest miscalculation yet.

Thought I get the second bit of satire would get this one in.

Order, order, order question to the Prime Minister (PMQs):

1: Do you realise that you are the laughing stock of the week can you explain and why. Comments welcome. Oink oink?

2: What you know about Lord Ashcroft tax havens and what will you do to crawl back the UK taxes?gedtik

Frankly, the amount of negative press reports over the leader of Labour Party is reaching boiling point. It’s only been a week since he is in the post let the voters decide who they want as the next Prime Minister.

The press and media are becoming a very scratch record beyond redemption.

This also reminds me about five years ago when we were choosing a new leader in the party when Gordon Brown decided to step down the same thing happened. The same happened to Ed Miliband with the negative press over bacon butty.

When will people get it the Tory rags are only interested in getting the Conservatives re-elected and selling their propaganda. Granted there is a saying “A week in politics is a long time”. The press, social media and the general public wants to have an understanding of where is he coming from and will he be fit to be the next prime minister to lead our great nation. In truth it’s early days and I suspect that comrade Corbyn has just realised that he is in the deep end of cut throat politics by embracing a broad church shadow cabinet and using his wit to take on the press to answer difficult questions from them.

Only this week we all had a taste of how Jeremy Corbyn will hold up during Prime Minister Questions Time (PMQs). As usual the Prime Minister of the day will give all the pleasantries to our newly elected leader. The next PMQs no doubt Jeremy Corbyn will have to up his game and be more eloquent and firm with the questions he puts to David Cameron then go on the attack. Granted the prime minister questions time had a different format and this allowed David Cameron to get in some spin doctors message.

Then the usual suspect press are alleging that certain Senior Labour MPs putting the knife in the back of Jeremy Corbyn and already the knife is out for them in a form of petition for them to be deselected by their Constituency Labour Party (CLP). Then surely it’s up to the CLP to decide or the parliamentary Labour Party to decide what action to take against those responsible for alleging to be putting the party in disrepute.

Thought I bit of satire would get this one in.

Order, order, order question to the Prime Minister (PMQs):

1: Do you realise that you are the laughing stock of the week can you explain and why. Comments welcome. Oink oink?

2: What you know about Lord Ashcroft tax havens and what will you do to crawl back the UK taxes?

Frankly, the amount of negative press reports over the leader of Labour Party is reaching boiling point. It’s only been a week since he is in the post let the voters decide who they want as the next Prime Minister.

The press and media are becoming a very scratch record beyond redemption.

This also reminds me about five years ago when we were choosing a new leader in the party when Gordon Brown decided to step down the same thing happened. The same happened to Ed Miliband with the negative press over bacon butty.

When will people get it the Tory rags are only interested in getting the Conservatives re-elected and selling their propaganda. Granted there is a saying “A week in politics is a long time”. The press, social media and the general public wants to have an understanding of where is he coming from and will he be fit to be the next prime minister to lead our great nation. In truth it’s early days and I suspect that comrade Corbyn has just realised that he is in the deep end of cut throat politics by embracing a broad church shadow cabinet and using his wit to take on the press to answer difficult questions from them.

Only this week we all had a taste of how Jeremy Corbyn will hold up during Prime Minister Questions Time (PMQs). As usual the Prime Minister of the day will give all the pleasantries to our newly elected leader. The next PMQs no doubt Jeremy Corbyn will have to up his game and be more eloquent and firm with the questions he puts to David Cameron then go on the attack. Granted the prime minister questions time had a different format and this allowed David Cameron to get in some spin doctors message.

Then the usual suspect press are alleging that certain Senior Labour MPs putting the knife in the back of Jeremy Corbyn and already the knife is out for them in a form of petition for them to be deselected by their Constituency Labour Party (CLP). Then surely it’s up to the CLP to decide or the parliamentary Labour Party to decide what action to take against those responsible for alleging to be putting the party in disrepute.

I’m more concerned in what will be in a Labour manifesto such as:

Youth services which includes employment to recruit young people to gain full employment.

Proper funding of our public services and for services at the point of need like our NHS, and Libraries and education

How to grow on the economy and attracting people back into employment, building more social housing, regeneration of cities, town centres, and involving small businesses.

Immigration, social chapter, national security, foreign affairs, taxation, human rights, schools, Europe, mental health, physical disabilities, family friendly policies, welfare, devolution, Living Wage, National Min Wage, pensions, police crime commissioners, HS2, localism, transportation, social justice, local government and fox hunting to name a few and it should be decided at national conference before it goes into our manifesto.

I make no apologies for saying that vote for Jeremy Corbyn was my third choice. I stand united by the leadership. If anything Jeremy Corbyn has stimulated debate in our party and lots of people have join the party which is a good. Let’s not forget that Jeremy Corbyn got more votes than Tony Blair and Ed Miliband in the leadership contest.

 

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