All eyes on Sleaford and North Hykeham By-elections


I pass my deepest sympathy to my American family and friends. Hope is lost desperation stupidity and bigotry has won. The world is bowing to the right which is becoming a frightening place of uncertainties as people idolise false heroes.jndgmg

All Brexiters should try explaining to your more than two million fellow workers, not born here, how they have benefited from the decision of the House of Commons 295 – 250 votes last week NOT to protect their right to remain, consequent on the referendum result. This out-trumps Trump in that it will mean the removal of entirely ‘legal’ workers whereas he is only threatening so-called ‘illegals’. Defend and extend Freedom of Movement of People! We know what horrors lay down the path of forced extradition

David Remnick and Peter Edwards from the New Yorker from Labour List sums up so eloquently and about the USA Election in reference to Donald Trump.

Peter Edwards:

The world is in shock today at the election of Donald Trump. Of course, many of the headlines here – and the horror – are driven by how a supertanned former reality television host was catapulted to the role of leader of the free world on the back of a nasty, divisive and dangerous campaign but there are equally troubling questions over where this leaves the left.

Firstly, the result Trump triumphed over Hillary Clinton after winning a handful of key swing states driven by votes from the white working class, who had abandoned a party of the centre-left.

The Donald won 48 per cent of the popular vote, one point ahead of Clinton, and delivered a further knock to the reputation of pollsters who had recorded a five point lead for the Democrat within the last week.

Trump’s win has been called a “Brexit-style” shock but the reality is it that it is far bigger. Britain can still proper in the aftermath of our decoupling from the EU but can the US economy, foreign relations and key left-wing reforms such as Obamacare survive this new Republican regime – indeed one led by a candidate who was such an embarrassment that even George W. Bush did not bother to cast a vote.

David Remnick:

The election of Donald Trump to the Presidency is nothing less than a tragedy for the American republic, a tragedy for the Constitution, and a triumph for the forces, at home and abroad, of nativism, authoritarianism, misogyny, and racism. Trump’s shocking victory, his ascension to the Presidency is a sickening event in the history of the United States and liberal democracy. On January 20, 2017, we will bid farewell to the first African American President—a man of integrity, dignity, and generous spirit—and witness the inauguration of a con who did little to spurn endorsement by forces of xenophobia and white supremacy. It is impossible to react to this moment with anything less than revulsion and profound anxiety.

There are, inevitably, miseries to come: an increasingly reactionary Supreme Court; an emboldened right-wing Congress; a President whose disdain for women and minorities, civil liberties and scientific fact, to say nothing of simple decency, has been repeatedly demonstrated. Trump is vulgarity unbounded, a knowledge-free national leader who will not only set markets tumbling but will strike fear into the hearts of the vulnerable, the weak, and, above all, the many varieties of Other whom he has so deeply insulted. The African-American, Hispanic, females, Jewish and Muslim the most hopeful way to look at this grievous event and it’s a stretchis that this election and the years to follow will be a test of the strength, or the fragility, of American institutions. It will be a test of our seriousness and resolve.

Early on Election Day, the polls held out cause for concern, but they provided sufficiently promising news for Democrats in states like Pennsylvania, Michigan, North Carolina, and even Florida that there was every reason to think about celebrating the fulfilment of Seneca Falls, the election of the first woman to the White House. Potential victories in states like Georgia disappeared, little more than a week ago, with the F.B.I. director’s heedless and damaging letter to Congress about reopening his investigation and the reappearance of damaging buzzwords like “e-mails,” “Anthony Weiner,” and “fifteen-year-old girl.” But the odds were still with Hillary Clinton. See article below:

http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/an-american-tragedy-donald-trump

It is said in some quarters thoughts on the Brexit debatet the Brexitiers want to ignore that over 16 million did not vote for Brexit. The tradition in the United Kingdom is that we have a PLURALIST society that means that the views of what in a substantial minority are taken into account when any settlement is made. If this is not so then we have what John Stewart Mill called the “TYRANNY OF THE MAJORITY” and consequently, society would remain divided with the growth of intolerance and nationalism. khkhThe whole of Europe, including the UK has suffered with bloody wars for centuries caused by nationalism and we must be aware of their manifestation. The worry is that that Mrs May does not appear to have the intelligence to accept the ruling of the court and get a settlement that is acceptable to the whole of the UK people. What a disgrace our “British” newspapers are rottweilers how democratically accountable are they? What non-UK based interests do they represent and serve?

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-37888663

Respect to Gina Miller, I’ve got a lot of time for her by putting Nigel Farage in his place on the Andrew Marr show  one day I really  hope to meet her and shake her hand. In case you have not read the profile of Gina Miller here is a brief detail:

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gina_Miller

Gina Miller was the person who took the establishment to the high court for force the government to have a vote in parliament and her legal team won the case only for the government to decide to appeal the decision. See original case below:

https://www.judiciary.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2016/11/judgment-r-miller-v-secretary-of-state-for-exiting-the-eu-20161103.pdf

Theresa May has insisted the government is “getting on” with Brexit, following a High Court ruling that Parliament must vote on when the formal process of leaving the EU can get under way.

The prime minister urged MPs and peers to “remember” the referendum result. But the campaigner who brought the High Court case said it would stop ministers acting like a “tin-pot dictatorship”.

Judges ruled on that Parliament should vote on when the government can trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty, starting formal negotiations with the EU. Mrs May has promised to invoke Article 50 by the end of next March.

The government argues ministers already have sufficient powers – under the Royal Prerogative – to do this without MPs and peers having a vote. It has vowed to fight to get the ruling overturned next month in the Supreme Court.

What a lark, for once I have to concur with Jeremy Corbyn team singing from the same tune which I never thought this will happen over Brexit and give them credit where it is due. This is very unusual on the grounds of there are many from the party that are from political ideologies and the establishment would have got away with murder if it was not for the them to actually unite on a common goal for the establishment to explain to parliament what is Ice Queen Theresa May to allow a vote in parliament over article 50. See articles below:

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/jeremy-corbyn-wants-to-hear-theresa-mays-brexit-plans-without-delay_uk_581db3bee4b020461a1c7852

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/yvette-cooper/article-50-high-court_b_12811676.html

Shadow Brexit secretary (Keir Starmer) says Labour will not frustrate the process of leaving the EU but wants government to reveal terms. Starmer did, however, say that the party could try to amend any bill to begin the process of beginning Brexit, and would seek to preserve access to the EU’s customs union and elements of the single market. He was speaking before the government’s official response in the Commons later on Monday 14 November 2016 to the court ruling, which said parliament must vote on article 50 before it happens.

The decision, against which the government will appeal, has prompted anger from some supporters of Brexit. See details below:

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/nov/07/keir-starmer-labour-will-not-block-article-50-but-must-know-plan

It’s highly noticeable that the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State and Ice Queen Theresa May continued to be very silent on the number of abuse the three high court judges are receiving. Then all of a sudden they broke their silence coming out in support of the three high court judges after the many abuse they received well honeys it’s too late the damage has been done.

The director of public prosecutions is considering a complaint that voters were misled by the Vote Leave and Leave.EU campaigns, in contravention of electoral law.

The complaint about “undue influence” on the referendum campaign has been submitted by an independent group, spearheaded by Prof Bob Watt, an expert in electoral law from the University of Buckingham. Though most cases require a police complaint before evidence can be considered by the Crown Prosecution services see details below:

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/nov/07/brexit-cps-considers-complaint-that-leave-campaigns-misled-voters

In another intriguing development Jeremy Hunt has admitted that the NHS needs more money and warned that this winter could be “very challenging” for the service.

The Health Secretary gave his strongest hint yet that he is urging Chancellor Philip Hammond to provide an emergency cash boost in the coming Autumn Statement.

Hunt also appeared to drop the claim that the NHS was already getting an extra £10bn from the Government, referring instead to “£4bn”, the figure that the Health Select Committee and think tanks say is the real number expected by 2021.

A trio of leading health bodies the King’s Fund, the Nuffield Trust and the Health Foundation will this week call for billions more to help the service cope with growing pressures from an elderly population and record budget deficits. Hunt conceded that he wanted both more reform and more resources for the NHS. “Many of these people are my dear friends and like me they are totally passionate about the NHS,” he said.

“We do tend to get in the run up to an Autumn Statement or a Budget, a coalition of people who do say that the answer to all the NHS problems is more money from the Government.

“The big question here is, does the NHS have enough money?  And the answer to that is we do need more resources.

“We are looking after a million more over-75s than we were five years ago…and that’s why we are putting in £4bn more.” See details below:

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/jeremy-hunt-admits-nhs-needs-more-money-autumn-statement-winter-crisis-philip-hammond-10bn-4bn_uk_581f3c0ae4b0c2e24aafc910

Now that the nitty gritty is partly out of the way here something that many of us have been saying all along. UK households should brace themselves for a combination of rising inflation, low pay and increased debt that will squeeze living standards next year and push more people into financial difficulty, experts have warned.

Higher inflation, weak wage growth and rising levels of consumer debt are expected to weigh on households next year as the economy adjusts to the post-referendum environment.

Joanna Elson, chief executive of the Money Advice Trust, the charity that runs National Debtline, said: “The spectre of significantly higher inflation is a real concern. Many households have still not recovered from the last big squeeze on incomes in the aftermath of the financial crisis. The risk is that this new pressure on household budgets could tip many more people into financial difficulty. “As a society we need to prepare for what could be a significant increase in problem debt in the years ahead.” See further details below:

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2016/nov/05/higher-inflation-rising-debt-millions-fall-living-standards

THE Chancellor’s Autumn Statement later this month comes at a crossroads for our country.

The new Prime Minister has sacked George Osborne but the government has not yet ended his poisonous policies.

If Philip Hammond wants to make any kind of mark at all then he must kill stone dead George Osborne’s austerity policies.

Remember, austerity was partly justified by Osborne in 2010 on the need to keep credit rating agencies happy and maintain the confidence of the markets — an absurd and flawed basis at the time which resulted in sluggish recovery, greater insecurity, a decline in wages and the erosion of public services.

Osborne’s justification was insincere and the motivation was ideologically driven by the interests of the 1 per cent. After the EU referendum we are clearly well beyond what the ratings agencies may or may not think. That ship has well and truly sailed.

The irony for Osborne and David Cameron is that their austerity policies created many of the conditions in which the Leave campaign prospered and finished off their careers.

No-one would have batted an eye at the bus adverts promising much-needed funds for the NHS if we believed it was already fully funded.

Instead it is a struggle to get appointments, hospital services are closing, blue-light ambulances are missing their targets, and the Health Secretary is driving doctors either out of the country or into early retirement.

Similar mistakes were made with housing. If the government had invested in council housebuilding after the financial crash and recognised the opportunity as well as the need, then not only would we have shorter waiting lists but housing would not be viewed through the prism of migration.

We’d also have many thousands more younger people employed working in trades.

There’d have been more of a sense among working-class people throughout the country that things could and would get better.

For many voters, voting to leave the European Union was presented as a solution to austerity.

We had Tory MPs and Leave campaigners promise that leaving the EU would mean an end to austerity. In April, arch-Thatcherite John Redwood wrote in the Guardian: “I want to end austerity. Voters want prosperity, not austerity … If we leave the EU we will regain control of our own money. We could increase existing budgets and end the upcoming reductions.”

I disagree with this analysis, which ignores the importance of trade to the economy. But the sheer cynicism is staggering and sickening given everything this government has put the country through, with those with the least paying the highest price of all.

Redwood is right about one thing voters want prosperity not austerity. Yet on Monday next week the Tory government will be ploughing ahead with an ever-lower benefit cap which will affect 116,000 families by up to £6,000 a year, according to the Chartered Institute of Housing. It will push 300,000 children closer to homelessness. It is cruel, it is distressing and it must stop.

There are no shortages of moral and political arguments for announcing the end of austerity, but there is a practical one too.

The government has said it wants to have an industrial strategy. It has even changed the name of a government department to reflect this.

Yet continuing with even more austerity measures will reduce the ingredients that are crucial for a functioning industrial strategy.

We won’t just see reduced spending, but lower demand, fragile confidence, insufficient public investment in both the economy and public services which invest in the people would continue to be undermined.

Given the uncertainty of the coming years, why would a company invest in Britain if its own government is not prepared to?

Industrial strategy relies as much on the classroom as it does on the boardroom. Throughout the 21st century, our young people are going to need to be trained and retrained countless times to meet challenges and create new opportunities.

Jobs that don’t yet exist will come and go through the course of their working lives. Further education is going to be critical to all our economic health.

Yet in the first five years of Tory-led government, adult skills funding didn’t increase it was cut by 35 per cent. Colleges have been pushed to the brink of collapse when they should have been flourishing and equipping us for today and tomorrow.

Politics is in a state of flux. Expectations have been raised through the referendum. If Theresa May falls short, then her honeymoon will come to a juddering halt. Our job is to be ready with the answers, the arguments and the organisation for the Labour alternative.

Conservative MP Stephen Phillips has quit over “irreconcilable policy differences” with the government.

The MP, who has held the Lincolnshire seat of Sleaford and North Hykeham since 2010, backed leaving the EU but has accused ministers of ignoring Parliament since the Brexit vote.

He said he was “unable properly to represent the people who elected me”.

It comes as Theresa May said she was confident she would win a legal battle over her approach to Brexit talks.

Although Mr Phillips represents a safe Conservative seat, his surprise departure increases the pressure on Mrs May’s government – which has a working majority of 17.

It is not yet clear whether Mr Phillips, who won the seat last year with a majority of more than 24,000, will stand as an independent in a future by-election although this is thought to be unlikely. This is a short profile of him in a nutshell:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Phillips_(politician)

Well folks, it comes as no surprise on which I’m backing in this by-election of course it will be our Labour candidate Jim Clarke. See profile below:

http://labourlist.org/2016/11/it-is-not-right-that-working-people-have-to-choose-between-heating-and-eating-labours-ppc-in-lincolnshire/

 

 

 

 

 

 

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