my thoughts on Tory cuts since they took office 2010 / 2017


  • Over 1/2 Million fewer homeowners than in 2010, monthly rent costs at an all-time high. 74,000 families made homeless every year and doubled the number of people sleeping rough than 2010. Around 120,000 children were homeless during Christmas 2016. Young people more likely to be unemployed than the rest of the population the worst gap since the Tories were in power.
  • Scrapped Connections, career lifeline for many young people deciding their future and almost 1 million people on zero hours contracts, meaning no stability for workers and their families.
  • Oppose the NMW, introduced a fake Living Wage that is below the recommended amount. Number of employment tribunal cases fallen by 9,000 a month since the Government increased fees of up to 1,200 in 2016
  • Scrapped Educational Maintenance Allowance(EMA) and Treble tuition fees and School budgets down by 8% in real terms by 2020 and new funding formula expected to redistribute funding from inner city to rural schools in 2018-19 and Schools cutting staff due to funding crisis, almost 1/2 of teachers planning to quit in next 5 years.
  • Cut NHS budget by 1.5 in real terms and scrapped the nurse bursary, now over 6,000 fewer mental health nurses in 2010. Mental health spending fell by £600million in the last parliament. Mental health bed shortages resulting in teenagers unsafely being placed on adult wards.
  • 18,000 fewer police officers and more than 3,500 PCSOs lost their jobs in 3 years of the Troy Government. Violent crimes rose by 27% in 2015 alone and expected to do more for little and for nothing.
  • Around 5,000 fire-fighters jobs have been cut since 2010 and recruitment down. The Westminster government intends to cutit’s funding to the fire and rescue service by 20% during the course of this parliament. In the last parliament they cut it by 30%. As a result 10,000 frontline fire-fighters jobs have gone since 2010 – that is one in six. Stations, appliances and equipment have also been cut. Fire-fighter’s provide an all hazard emergency response attending floods, road traffic collisions, chemical spillages, civil contingencies, industrial disasters and terrorist attacks as well as fires.

English councils’ spending on neighbourhood services, such as bins, planning, potholes and leisure, has fallen by more than £3bn in the past five years. The huge cuts to funding and the wide variations between authorities in funding services were “changing the very nature of local government.”

The reductions amount to a dismantling of universal services that are the most high-profile, core functions of local government, the report says. “These services need defending in their own right as part of wider defence of local government as a whole.”

The most deprived council areas have seen the biggest falls in spending in these services – up to 22% on average over five years among the most deprived fifth of authorities, compared with just 5% among the wealthiest. The poorest areas had an especially sharp spending fall in, for example, food and water safety inspection, road safety and school crossings, community centres and services aimed at cutting crime – such as CCTV – and support for local bus services.

There were wide variations across the country, with some councils cutting neighbourhood services by 40% while others have increased these budgets by 20%.

Cuts to neighbourhood services have taken place against a backdrop of unprecedented cuts in local government spending as a share of the economy. In 2010-11, it accounted for 8.4% of the economy, falling to 6.7% by 2015-16. By 2020-21, it will be down to 5.7%, a 60-year low. Although much of the political focus of local government cuts has been on social care services, the impact on neighbourhood services, which include highways and transport, cultural services, environmental services and planning, has been far greater, the report says.

Spending on neighbourhood services in England fell £3.1bn, or 13%, between 2010-11 and 2015-16 at a time when social care spending increased by £2.3bn.

“Neighbourhood services should be on an equal footing to other public services and not viewed as a painless option for more cuts in local spending.” Council managers said there was a perception that funding for local government services was a “zero sum game” in which neighbourhood services had become collateral damage as councils sought to protect social care services. “In eight years, local government spending will have dropped from two thirds of that of central government’s to half. There is a slow but very harmful dismantling of neighbourhood services that marks a profound change in what local public services our communities can expect to receive. “From emptying bins to running swimming pools to providing high quality local parks, spending on these services which communities really value has been cut harder and faster than any other area of public service spend. Centrally driven austerity has fallen hardest on local shoulders. ”

Theresa May should not be adapting David Cameron’s tired rhetoric about “a strong economy, strong defence and strong, stable leadership” might not be a good idea?

Cameron’s didn’t help him when his European Union referendum gamble blew up in his face and he had to walk the plank. Constantly repeating an adviser’s soundbite would guarantee studio audience irritation and reveal an inability to move from scripted speech to impromptu discussion of key issues.

Theresa May’s refusal to participate in TV debates is a clear-cut admission of political weakness. Her suggestion that she will “get out and about and meet with voters” and will be too busy to spare a few hours in debate with Corbyn and others holds no water.

She will be protected from cross-examination except on her terms, concentrating on set-piece speeches surrounded by enthusiastic Tory activists to provide flattering short clips for news bulletins. The decision by ITV to press ahead with election-time leaders’ debates even if May refuses to take part is to be welcomed.

Other TV stations should take the same stance. No prime minister should have a veto on head-to-head political argument.

May’s reticence to cross swords with political opponents confirms that the Tory Prime Minister has not chosen to call a general election because of political strength but of weakness. Not only is she apprehensive about future support from her backbenchers but also over possible impending criminal charges over the Tories’ 2015 election expenses.

She has enjoyed a honeymoon period since sliding into the Tory leadership, being joined by the mass media, many Labour backbenchers, Scottish and Welsh nationalists and even the diminutive rump previously known as the Liberal Democrats in a free-for-all assault on Labour .

May wants to portray the June 8 election as a contest between her determination to honour the voters’ referendum decision and efforts by all other parties to sabotage that democratic choice.

I foresee more cuts to be announced after the snap General Elections should Ice Queen Theresa May receive a mandate from the the voters I kid you not this os on the grounds of pleasing the hard brexiters in the conservative party and their donors.

I rather see a return pf a Labour Government instead of a Conservative one.

Use your vote to vote a Labour Government into power on 8 Jun

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One response to “my thoughts on Tory cuts since they took office 2010 / 2017

  1. Pingback: By Gordon Lyew: My Thoughts On Tory Cuts Since They Took Office | Declaration Of Opinion

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