Category Archives: #ElectedPoliceCommissioners

Don’t trust Conservatives to run our public services which side are you on public or private sectors


The chancellor or the prime minister could not give a flying monkeys if our growth goes up or down as long as they get pay cheque paid into their bank account(s) every month complements of the taxpayers and in return public service workers gets kick between the legs with less pay increase and more cuts to public services. The lower your income the more you will get smacked in the face with further increases in food, and energy prices and mobile bills which pushes people to join longer queues outside the foodbanks and junk food projects to feed their families just to make ends meet.

Who remembers who Ice Queen Theresa May first speech outside 10 Downing Street, here is the full speech she made:

I have just been to Buckingham Palace, where Her Majesty The Queen has asked me to form a new government, and I accepted.

In David Cameron, I follow in the footsteps of a great, modern Prime Minister. Under David’s leadership, the government stabilised the economy, reduced the budget deficit, and helped more into work than ever before.

But David’s true legacy is not about the economy but about social justice. From the introduction of same sex marriage,  to taking people on low wages out of income tax altogether; David Cameron has led a one-nation government, and it is in that spirit that I also plan to lead.

Because not everybody knows this, but the full title of my party is the Conservative and Unionist Party, and that word ‘unionist’ is very important to me.

It means we believe in the Union: the precious, precious bond between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. But it means something else that is just as important; it means we believe in a union not just between the nations of the United Kingdom but between all of our citizens, every one of us, whoever we are and wherever we’re from.

That means fighting against the burning injustice that, if you’re born poor, you will die on average 9 years earlier than others.

If you’re black, you’re treated more harshly by the criminal justice system than if you’re white.

If you’re a white, working-class boy, you’re less likely than anybody else in Britain to go to university.

If you’re at a state school, you’re less likely to reach the top professions than if you’re educated privately.

If you’re a woman, you will earn less than a man. If you suffer from mental health problems, there’s not enough help to hand.

If you’re young, you’ll find it harder than ever before to own your own home.

But the mission to make Britain a country that works for everyone means more than fighting these injustices. If you’re from an ordinary working class family, life is much harder than many people in Westminster realise. You have a job but you don’t always have job security. You have your own home, but you worry about paying a mortgage. You can just about manage but you worry about the cost of living and getting your kids into a good school.

If you’re one of those families, if you’re just managing, I want to address you directly.

I know you’re working around the clock, I know you’re doing your best, and I know that sometimes life can be a struggle. The government I lead will be driven not by the interests of the privileged few, but by yours.

We will do everything we can to give you more control over your lives. When we take the big calls, we’ll think not of the powerful, but you. When we pass new laws, we’ll listen not to the mighty but to you. When it comes to taxes, we’ll prioritise not the wealthy, but you. When it comes to opportunity, we won’t entrench the advantages of the fortunate few. We will do everything we can to help anybody, whatever your background, to go as far as your talents will take you.

We are living through an important moment in our country’s history. Following the referendum, we face a time of great national change.

And I know because we’re Great Britain, that we will rise to the challenge. As we leave the European Union, we will forge a bold new positive role for ourselves in the world, and we will make Britain a country that works not for a privileged few, but for every one of us.

That will be the mission of the government I lead, and together we will build a better Britain.

If you ask the ordinary Joe Blogs out in the real world they would say the conservatives are not the party for the working class they are more for the rich and they have their finger in every pie and they will shaft you as soon as they get what they want form you. Look at what they did to the coal miners and manufacturing industries.

It is highly noticeable that childcare vouchers have been put on hold by six months by conservative ministers with the full support of bed partners DUP helped to secure voting against Labour motion here is the list of conservative and DUP who proudly voted against the opposition motion see names below: 

Here is the list of MPs who voted against the motion:

Conservative (304)

Adams, Nigel
Afolami, Bim
Afriyie, Adam
Aldous, Peter
Allan, Lucy
Allen, Heidi
Amess, Sir David
Andrew, Stuart
Argar, Edward
Atkins, Victoria
Bacon, Mr Richard
Badenoch, Mrs Kemi
Baker, Mr Steve
Baldwin, Harriett
Barclay, Stephen
Baron, Mr John
Bebb, Guto
Bellingham, Sir Henry
Benyon, rh Richard
Beresford, Sir Paul
Berry, Jake
Blackman, Bob
Blunt, Crispin
Boles, Nick
Bone, Mr Peter
Bottomley, Sir Peter
Bowie, Andrew
Bradley, Ben
Bradley, rh Karen
Brady, Sir Graham
Brereton, Jack
Bridgen, Andrew
Brine, Steve
Brokenshire, rh James
Bruce, Fiona
Buckland, Robert
Burghart, Alex
Burns, Conor
Burt, rh Alistair
Cairns, rh Alun
Cartlidge, James
Cash, Sir William
Caulfield, Maria
Chalk, Alex
Chishti, Rehman
Chope, Sir Christopher
Churchill, Jo
Clark, Colin
Clark, rh Greg
Clarke, rh Mr Kenneth
Clarke, Mr Simon
Cleverly, James
Clifton-Brown, Sir Geoffrey
Coffey, Dr Thérèse
Collins, Damian
Costa, Alberto
Courts, Robert
Cox, Mr Geoffrey
Crabb, rh Stephen
Crouch, Tracey
Davies, Chris
Davies, David T. C.
Davies, Glyn
Davies, Mims
Davis, rh Mr David
Dinenage, Caroline
Djanogly, Mr Jonathan
Docherty, Leo
Donelan, Michelle
Double, Steve
Dowden, Oliver
Doyle-Price, Jackie
Drax, Richard
Duddridge, James
Duguid, David
Duncan, rh Sir Alan
Duncan Smith, rh Mr Iain
Dunne, Mr Philip
Ellis, Michael
Ellwood, rh Mr Tobias
Eustice, George
Evans, Mr Nigel
Evennett, rh David
Fabricant, Michael
Fallon, rh Sir Michael
Fernandes, Suella
Field, rh Mark
Ford, Vicky
Foster, Kevin
Fox, rh Dr Liam
Francois, rh Mr Mark
Frazer, Lucy
Freeman, George
Fysh, Mr Marcus
Garnier, Mark
Gauke, rh Mr David
Ghani, Ms Nusrat
Gibb, rh Nick
Gillan, rh Dame Cheryl
Glen, John
Goldsmith, Zac
Goodwill, Mr Robert
Gove, rh Michael
Graham, Luke
Graham, Richard
Grant, Bill
Grant, Mrs Helen
Grayling, rh Chris
Green, Chris
Green, rh Damian
Greening, rh Justine
Grieve, rh Mr Dominic
Griffiths, Andrew
Gyimah, Mr Sam
Hair, Kirstene
Halfon, rh Robert
Hall, Luke
Hammond, rh Mr Philip
Hammond, Stephen
Hancock, rh Matt
Hands, rh Greg
Harper, rh Mr Mark
Harrington, Richard
Harris, Rebecca
Harrison, Trudy
Hart, Simon
Hayes, rh Mr John
Heald, rh Sir Oliver
Heappey, James
Heaton-Harris, Chris
Heaton-Jones, Peter
Henderson, Gordon
Herbert, rh Nick
Hinds, rh Damian
Hoare, Simon
Hollingbery, George
Hollinrake, Kevin
Hollobone, Mr Philip
Holloway, Adam
Howell, John
Huddleston, Nigel
Hunt, rh Mr Jeremy
Hurd, rh Mr Nick
Jack, Mr Alister
James, Margot
Javid, rh Sajid
Jayawardena, Mr Ranil
Jenkin, Mr Bernard
Jenkyns, Andrea
Jenrick, Robert
Johnson, rh Boris
Johnson, Dr Caroline
Johnson, Gareth
Johnson, Joseph
Jones, Andrew
Jones, rh Mr David
Jones, Mr Marcus
Kawczynski, Daniel
Keegan, Gillian
Kennedy, Seema
Kerr, Stephen
Knight, rh Sir Greg
Knight, Julian
Kwarteng, Kwasi
Lamont, John
Lancaster, rh Mark
Leadsom, rh Andrea
Lee, Dr Phillip
Lefroy, Jeremy
Leigh, Sir Edward
Letwin, rh Sir Oliver
Lewer, Andrew
Lewis, rh Brandon
Lewis, rh Dr Julian
Liddell-Grainger, Mr Ian
Lidington, rh Mr David
Lopez, Julia
Lopresti, Jack
Lord, Mr Jonathan
Loughton, Tim
Mackinlay, Craig
Maclean, Rachel
Main, Mrs Anne
Mak, Alan
Malthouse, Kit
Mann, Scott
Masterton, Paul
May, rh Mrs Theresa
Maynard, Paul
McLoughlin, rh Sir Patrick
McPartland, Stephen
McVey, rh Ms Esther
Menzies, Mark
Mercer, Johnny
Merriman, Huw
Metcalfe, Stephen
Milling, Amanda
Mills, Nigel
Milton, rh Anne
Mitchell, rh Mr Andrew
Moore, Damien
Mordaunt, rh Penny
Morgan, rh Nicky
Morris, Anne Marie
Morris, David
Morris, James
Murray, Mrs Sheryll
Murrison, Dr Andrew
Neill, Robert
Newton, Sarah
Nokes, rh Caroline
Norman, Jesse
O’Brien, Neil
Offord, Dr Matthew
Opperman, Guy
Parish, Neil
Patel, rh Priti
Pawsey, Mark
Penning, rh Sir Mike
Penrose, John
Percy, Andrew
Perry, rh Claire
Philp, Chris
Pincher, Christopher
Poulter, Dr Dan
Pow, Rebecca
Prentis, Victoria
Prisk, Mr Mark
Pritchard, Mark
Pursglove, Tom
Quin, Jeremy
Quince, Will
Raab, Dominic
Redwood, rh John
Rees-Mogg, Mr Jacob
Robertson, Mr Laurence
Robinson, Mary
Rosindell, Andrew
Ross, Douglas
Rowley, Lee
Rudd, rh Amber
Rutley, David
Sandbach, Antoinette
Scully, Paul
Seely, Mr Bob
Selous, Andrew
Shapps, rh Grant
Sharma, Alok
Shelbrooke, Alec
Simpson, rh Mr Keith
Skidmore, Chris
Smith, Chloe
Smith, Henry
Smith, rh Julian
Smith, Royston
Soames, rh Sir Nicholas
Soubry, rh Anna
Spelman, rh Dame Caroline
Spencer, Mark
Stephenson, Andrew
Stevenson, John
Stewart, Bob
Stewart, Iain
Stewart, Rory
Streeter, Mr Gary
Stride, rh Mel
Stuart, Graham
Sturdy, Julian
Sunak, Rishi
Swayne, rh Sir Desmond
Swire, rh Sir Hugo
Syms, Sir Robert
Thomas, Derek
Thomson, Ross
Throup, Maggie
Tolhurst, Kelly
Tomlinson, Justin
Tomlinson, Michael
Tracey, Craig
Tredinnick, David
Trevelyan, Mrs Anne-Marie
Truss, rh Elizabeth
Tugendhat, Tom
Vaizey, rh Mr Edward
Vara, Mr Shailesh
Vickers, Martin
Villiers, rh Theresa
Walker, Mr Charles
Walker, Mr Robin
Wallace, rh Mr Ben
Warburton, David
Warman, Matt
Watling, Giles
Whately, Helen
Wheeler, Mrs Heather
Whittaker, Craig
Whittingdale, rh Mr John
Wiggin, Bill
Williamson, rh Gavin
Wollaston, Dr Sarah
Wood, Mike
Wragg, Mr William
Wright, rh Jeremy
Zahawi, Nadhim

Democratic Unionist Party (10)

Campbell, Mr Gregory
Dodds, rh Nigel
Donaldson, rh Sir Jeffrey M.
Girvan, Paul
Little Pengelly, Emma
Paisley, Ian
Robinson, Gavin
Shannon, Jim
Simpson, David
Wilson, rh Sammy

Independent (1)

In further development Theresa May has been officially rebuked for misleading MPs and the public over false claims that the government is providing an extra £450m in funding to local police forces in 2018/19.

The chair of the UK Statistics Authority, Sir David Norgrove, ruled on Tuesday that the claim made by May repeatedly at prime minister’s questions last month “could have led the public to conclude incorrectly” that the government was providing an extra £450m for police spending over the next financial year.

Labour MPs are expected to try to challenge May over her misleading statements about police funding at prime minister’s questions on Wednesday.

The shadow police and crime minister, Louise Haigh, who made the complaint to the statistics watchdog, said that in fact there had been a “flat cash” settlement for police forces in England and Wales that actually amounted to a cut in direct Whitehall grants to the police in real terms. Haigh said the “extra £450m” would only be found if police and crime commissioners pushed through an increase to council tax to raise £270m. About £130m of the £450m is to go directly to “national police priorities” rather than local forces and a further £50m is to be provided for counter-terrorism funding.

The prime minister’s claim that local police force budgets were being boosted by £450m was repeated by Home Office tweets and in a letter sent out by Andrea Leadsom, the leader of the House of Commons.

“We have commented in the past about statements on police funding and emphasised the need for greater precision in the way numbers are used,” Norgrove told Haigh in his response to her complaint.

“In terms of the particular points you make, the prime minister’s statement and the Home Office’s tweet could have led the public to conclude incorrectly that central government is providing an additional £450m for police spending in 2018/19.

“The Home Office tweet also implied that the £450m sum is guaranteed. As the minister for policing’s statement outlined, up to £270m of the funding settlement will come from local council tax, if police and crime commissioners and mayors choose to raise these sums. In addition, the leader of the House of Commons stated that the £270m that can be raised locally was on top of the overall settlement of up to £450m,” wrote Norgrove.

The statistics watchdog said complex funding arrangements were difficult to explain in the “time compressed context” of PMQs but said the Home Office did not face this constraint in its tweet. He suggested the Home Office’s head of statistics made sure his colleagues understood the structure of police funding and the importance of making clear public statements.

Haigh called for the PM to apologise. She said: “The Tories are not being straight with the public on police funding and now they have been found out. See article below:

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/mar/20/theresa-may-accused-of-misleading-public-over-extra-police-funding

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/nov/09/britains-police-budgets-to-lose-700m-by-2020-amid-rising

Council tax bills on the up. Public services neglected, outsourced, privatised. People are being let down by their local authorities across the country, and they are acutely aware of it. Whether their council is controlled by Labour or Tories, it’s likely that in May they’ll put the blame where it belongs – with the Tory government.

Over the last eight years, council budgets have been reduced by 50 per cent. The cuts aren’t evenly distributed either, with the most deprived local authorities actually being hit by deeper cuts than the rest.

The Local Government Association says children’s services need £2bn to plug the funding gap. Faced with a surge in demand, councils are having to surpass their budgets to protect children at immediate risk of harm.

Of course each problem is connected. A family becomes homeless and gets placed in temporary accommodation, maybe a single room in a hostel. The children have no space to do their homework, so their performance at school declines. They’re tired; there is drug-taking and anti-social behaviour in the building and the police are called out regularly. Their mother’s mental health worsens, she start taking anti-depressants.

I truly don’t mean to sound glib – I’m describing a situation that I encountered many times as a parliamentary caseworker. One isolated event, like a private landlord serving its tenants with an eviction notice, leads to pressure on housing, welfare, emergency services, health, education, and so on.

As Corbyn says, the May elections are a chance for people to send a clear message: “enough is enough”. See article below from Sienna Rodgers LabourList

https://labourlist.org/2018/03/pay-more-for-less-under-the-tories/

How can you trust the Conservatives to run our beloved public services when the UK’s new homelessness minister has told the Guardian she does not know why the number of rough sleepers has increased so significantly in recent years. Heather Wheeler said she did not accept the suggestion that welfare reforms and council cuts had contributed to the rise.

On a visit to a housing project in Glasgow, Wheeler said she remained “totally confident” she would not have to act on her pledge to resign should she fail to meet the Conservative manifesto commitment of halving rough sleeping by 2022, and eradicating it by 2027. “We’re going to move heaven and earth to get that done,” she promised. See article below:

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/mar/18/homelessness-minister-heather-wheeler-rough-sleeping-housing-first

The question still remains who do you trust to run our public services I say “Don’t trust Conservatives to run our public services which side are you on public or private sectors” If you are thinking to vote Conservatives and care about Public services then the Conservatives is not the party for you. If you want a better future want to see improvements in services to public services then I would strongly suggest that you vote for Labour on 3 May to improve public services.

 

Advertisements

Run,Madam May run, run, run away


Its about time that Theresa may take notice and do the nation a very big favor continue to run away.

Firstly, well done to Lewis Hamiltion for coming first place and took outright championship lead in the Italian Grand Prix for the first time in this season on Sunday 3 September 2017 with a four point lead and I wish him all the best for Hamiltion in the Singapore Grand Prix on 15 – 17 September. Now that I got this out of the way down to more serious business of the day.
Police morale is at a all time low among three in every five police officers. The Police Federation poll shown the treatment of the pay service as a whole pay and work life balance were having the biggest impact on morle. The proportion of officers planning to leave the service within two years was up from 11.8% last year to 12.3%. To top it off policing in England and Wales is facing a shortage of staff and raising crime. Policing services are based on fewer people working more hours and days. All the Home office can say in their defence policing offered competitive pay and a good pension. So in a nutshell take what you get from abusive public and get on with your job or else face the sack.
To be very frank, I whole heartily support the call from the NHS for a  bail out unless it is properly funded the service will be the worst winter in recent history if it does not receive an emergency bailout. The cash is needed to pay for extra staff and beds on the grounds of extra attempts to improve finances have failed. The conservative government has given councils an extra one billon pounds for social care strives to help relieve the pressure on hospitals. The feeble response from the Department of Health the “NHS has prepared for winter more this year than ever before” is unacceptable in my opinion as it is opening the floodgate of backdoor deals to privatisation on a large scale so be warned.
There comes a time to say enough is enough to Jeremy Hunt and a hat tip to Stephen Hawkings for speaking out against privatisation of our NHS. Keep Public Service public which side are you on. See article below:
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2017/aug/18/stephen-hawking-blames-tory-politicians-for-damaging-nhs?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other
Well we all guessed what the reply from Jeremy Hunt would be and I would not expect anything else from the toffee nose which goes like this Jeremy Hunt has accused Stephen Hawking of a “pernicious” lie after the physicist said it seemed the Tories were steering the UK towards a US-style health insurance system. See article below:
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/aug/19/jeremy-hunt-says-stephen-hawking-is-wrong-on-the-nhs?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

What a jerk Theresa May has become on the one hand she is trying to woo the working class by enticing them with left wing policies to make a convincing argument to gain our trust then using right wing arguments to win over natural conservatives its no wonder why she is under pressure from her backbenchers and she is doing what she can to keep her position and at the same time keeping her backbenchers at bay to maintain control of the Conservatives. Hence her speech in Japan she wants to stay as leader and Prime Minister into the next general elections. During her leadership for the conservative party in October 2016 she said that directors must be held to account and be transparent with their pay and under her leadership they will have to change alas this is not to be a sad day indeed. Sunday 27 August 2017 Theresa May took to the Sunday mail to write a hasty article by stating business who pay excessive salaries to senior executives represent the “unacceptable face of capitalism”. The “excesses” of some bosses was undermining confidence the social fabric of our country”. Firms should that face revolts over salaries and bonuses will be named on a new public register. If she thinks it will win over the minds of working class its no wonder that all the trade unions said it was feeble.
The nation is aware of a police are purportedly investigating the claims of a call centre in Neath to canvassing voters during the General Elections 2017 campaign. It’s no surprise the Tories quoting they don’t comment on a on going investigations.
Can anybody imagine United Kingdom divided over partition take for instance Pakistan, India, Bangladesh or Hong King are some clear examples which was part of British empire and dare I say it British imperialism. Whilst I acknowledge independence is important, there are nations are ruled by dictators and it’s citizens are monitored by the government. Citizens should not be afraid of its government but the governments should be afraid of its people. Governments continue to make promises and voters has to be reminded that a promise is a comfort to a fool.
It’s alleged that net migration has fallen to the lowest level for three years after a surge in the number in the number of EU nationals leaving the UK since June  Brexit vote. The net migration the difference between those entering and leaving the UK fell 81,000 to 246,000 in the year to march 2017. More than half that change is due to a decrease in net migration of EU citizens which is down 51,000.
High five and hat tip to Micheal Barnier the EU chief negotiator has raised concerns about the progress of UK Brexit negotiations. It’s just not good enough for Theresa May to appeal for unity from pro-EU conservative MPs as Commons is set to debate the government Brexit repeal bill. The bill seen as key plank of the government Brexit policy transfers EU law into UK legislation there will be proper scrutiny but some MPs fear it will give ministers sweeping new powers
I’m very glad of labour position of considering keeping the UK in the EU single market and customs union for a transitional period after leaving the EU. I’m even more intrigued by four articles by two Labour MPs and a Labour MEP see articles below:
https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/aug/21/chuka-umunna-labour-must-distance-itself-from-tories-on-brexit?CMP=share_btn_link

https://www.theguardian.com/global/2017/aug/26/labour-calls-for-lengthy-transitional-period-post-brexit?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/single-market-brexit-labour-keir-starmer-plan-could-cause-theresa-may-to-unravel-a7916606.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/brexit-housing-crisis-uk-just-lost-its-biggest-funder-a7909886.html

My message to Theresa May on her return to Parliament is continue to run around like a headless chicken and do continue to run, madam Theresa May run so a Labour government can get on with the job for the many and not for the few in the interest of our nation.

Labour unite to fight the conservatives let this be our mission to prove the conservative wrong.


How far are the Conservatives willing to go to work on the meaning of Brexit. It seems to me that they don’t have a clue what is best for our nation over Brexit. Now that I’ve done the pleasantries and people are sitting comfortably on the edge of their seats waiting for the sting to hit them in their face and their pockets. Here comes the announcement which I predicted the day that Ice Queen Theresa May had her coronation day she will be playing a cat and mouse games with our lives by triggering formal Brexit process by early next year followed by a snap General Election in 2017. This will come as no surprise to some people the moment Ice Queen Theresa May announced the trigger article 50, the clause needed to start the process in the early months of 2017 the sterling fell to a three year low against the euro and U.S. dollar.

Here is something that make you cringe when you this this person face:


Britain must size the “golden opportunity” provided by Brexit and not “fritter it away’. Notice the tone of language the Conservatives use to soften the blow to the British pubic in order to hoodwink us all into believing that the British voters will be daft into believing the conservative is the best thing since slice cake. UKIP are jumping for joy at the moment by winning the Brexit vote and they can’t seem to move from the past even though they have chosen a new leader in UKIP only for her to resign after 18 days being elected. So far we have seen changes in leadership of various political parties the only difference is many political parties in Parliament and councils calling on their foes to defect or cross the floor to their party.

Intriguing that Philip Hammond claims that he will prioritise spending on new homes and transportation and stabbing his chum in the back (George Osborne). It’s good to know that he acknowledges that the Brexit vote caused turbulence and business confidence would be on a bit of a rollercoaster. So in a nutshell he is hinting of borrowing more money to simulate the economy.

It’s no wonder why when we all look at the wider issue on rental homes the establishment will want to make a quick announcement to get it out of the way at their conference.

See article below UK mass shortage of rental homes:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37547912

My two close friends put their case so eloquently who said:

Chris Lowe:

International students bring 7 billion GBP into the UK every year. 55 current world leaders were educated in British universities.

In the EU Referendum, Leave campaigners celebrated the Australian visa system.

Australia has a government policy to target international students and bring more and more of them to Australia. The British government has the opposite policy.

In pursuit of Brexit, the Conservatives will turn the UK into a backwater of Europe, ignored except as a quaint tourist destination. In 50 years’ time, world leaders may not even remember that the UK exists, while outward looking countries benefit from the money of international students and the soft power that hosting future leaders brings.

J David Morgan:

The response to Amber Rudd

The plans were condemned as “madness” by Paul Blomfield, co-chair of the all-party parliamentary group on international students. The Labour MP said: “I’m shocked by the home secretary’s comments, which are spectacularly ill informed. She doesn’t seem to know how many universities we have in the UK or understand the current rules for which she is responsible, let alone appreciate the contribution international students make.
“International students bring £8bn a year to the UK economy, creating tens of thousands of jobs. Education is one of our most successful export industries. The only people cheering today’s announcement will be our competitors.”

Ice Queen Theresa May will use her Conference speech to claim the centre ground is the way forward. If I’m honest I don’t always support let along vote Tories, Ice Queen Theresa May does have a point for any party to win elections they need to move to the centre ground to win votes to form the next government in waiting. Hate to say it but listening to Ice Queen Theresa May on the one hand it sounded like part socialism and capitalism trying to convince our Labour supporters to cross over to the conservatives which includes UKIP and Libdems voters.nfjgkbn

Here is the full extract of Ice queen Theresa May full text Conference Speech In Birmingham 2016:

When we came to Birmingham this week, some big questions were hanging in the air.

Do we have a plan for Brexit? We do.

Are we ready for the effort it will take to see it through? We are.

Can Boris Johnson stay on message for a full four days? Just about.

But I know there’s another big question people want me to answer.

What’s my vision for Britain? My philosophy? My approach?

Today I want to answer that question very directly.

I want to set out my vision for Britain after Brexit.

I want to lay out my approach – the things I believe.

I want to explain what a country that works for everyone means.

I want to set our party and our country on the path towards the new centre ground of British politics…

built on the values of fairness and opportunity…

where everyone plays by the same rules and where every single person – regardless of their background, or that of their parents – is given the chance to be all they want to be.

And as I do so, I want to be clear about something else: that a vision is nothing without the determination to see it through.

No vision ever built a business by itself. No vision ever clothed a family or fed a hungry child. No vision ever changed a country on its own.

You need to put the hours in and the effort too.

But if you do, great things can happen. Great changes can occur.

And be in no doubt, that’s what Britain needs today.

Because in June people voted for change. And a change is going to come.

Change has got to come because as we leave the European Union and take control of our own destiny, the task of tackling some of Britain’s long-standing challenges – like how to train enough people to do the jobs of the future – becomes ever more urgent.

But change has got to come too because of the quiet revolution that took place in our country just three months ago – a revolution in which millions of our fellow citizens stood up and said they were not prepared to be ignored anymore.

Because this is a turning point for our country.

A once-in-a-generation chance to change the direction of our nation for good.

To step back and ask ourselves what kind of country we want to be.

Let’s be clear: we have come a long way over the past six years.

We’ve brought the deficit down.

Got more people into work than ever before.

Taken the lowest paid out of income tax.

Established a new National Living Wage.

Helped nearly a million new business to set up and grow.

Got almost one and a half million more children into good or outstanding schools.

Put record investment into the NHS.

Created nearly 3 million new apprenticeships.

And brought crime down by more than a quarter to its lowest ever level.

That’s a record of which we should all be proud.

And this morning it’s right that we pause to say thank you to the man who made that possible. A man who challenged us to change and told us that if we did then we would win again.

And he was right. We did change. We did win. The first majority Conservative Government in almost 25 years.

A great leader of our party – a great servant to our country.

David Cameron, thank you.

But now we need to change again. For the referendum was not just a vote to withdraw from the EU. It was about something broader – something that the European Union had come to represent.

It was about a sense – deep, profound and let’s face it often justified – that many people have today that the world works well for a privileged few, but not for them.

It was a vote not just to change Britain’s relationship with the European Union, but to call for a change in the way our country works – and the people for whom it works – forever.

Knock on almost any door in almost any part of the country, and you will find the roots of the revolution laid bare.

Our society should work for everyone, but if you can’t afford to get onto the property ladder, or your child is stuck in a bad school, it doesn’t feel like it’s working for you.

Our economy should work for everyone, but if your pay has stagnated for several years in a row and fixed items of spending keep going up, it doesn’t feel like it’s working for you.

Our democracy should work for everyone, but if you’ve been trying to say things need to change for years and your complaints fall on deaf ears, it doesn’t feel like it’s working for you.

And the roots of the revolution run deep. Because it wasn’t the wealthy who made the biggest sacrifices after the financial crash, but ordinary, working class families.

And if you’re one of those people who lost their job, who stayed in work but on reduced hours, took a pay cut as household bills rocketed, or – and I know a lot of people don’t like to admit this – someone who finds themselves out of work or on lower wages because of low-skilled immigration, life simply doesn’t seem fair.

It feels like your dreams have been sacrificed in the service of others.

So change has got to come.

Because if we don’t respond – if we don’t take this opportunity to deliver the change people want – resentments will grow. Divisions will become entrenched.

And that would be a disaster for Britain.

Because the lesson of Britain is that we are a country built on the bonds of family, community, citizenship.

Of strong institutions and a strong society.

The country of my parents who instilled in me a sense of public service and of public servants everywhere who want to give something back.

The parent who works hard all week but takes time out to coach the kids football team at the weekend.

The local family business in my constituency that’s been serving the community for more than 50 years.

The servicemen and women I met last week who wear their uniform proudly at home and serve our nation with honour abroad.

A country of decency, fairness and quiet resolve.

And a successful country – small in size but large in stature – that with less than 1% of the world’s population boasts more Nobel Laureates than any country outside the United States… with three more added again just yesterday – two of whom worked here in this great city.

A country that boasts three of the top ten universities in the world. The world’s leading financial capital. And institutions like the NHS and BBC whose reputations echo in some of the farthest corners of the globe.

All possible because we are one United Kingdom – England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – and I will always fight to preserve our proud, historic Union and will never let divisive nationalists drive us apart.

Yet within our society today, we see division and unfairness all around. Between a more prosperous older generation and a struggling younger generation. Between the wealth of London and the rest of the country.

But perhaps most of all, between the rich, the successful and the powerful – and their fellow citizens.

Now don’t get me wrong. We applaud success. We want people to get on.

But we also value something else: the spirit of citizenship.

That spirit that means you respect the bonds and obligations that make our society work. That means a commitment to the men and women who live around you, who work for you, who buy the goods and services you sell.

That spirit that means recognising the social contract that says you train up local young people before you take on cheap labour from overseas.

That spirit that means you do as others do, and pay your fair share of tax.

But today, too many people in positions of power behave as though they have more in common with international elites than with the people down the road, the people they employ, the people they pass in the street.

But if you believe you’re a citizen of the world, you’re a citizen of nowhere. You don’t understand what the very word ‘citizenship’ means.

So if you’re a boss who earns a fortune but doesn’t look after your staff…

An international company that treats tax laws as an optional extra…

A household name that refuses to work with the authorities even to fight terrorism…

A director who takes out massive dividends while knowing that the company pension is about to go bust…

I’m putting you on warning. This can’t go on anymore.

A change has got to come. And this party – the Conservative Party – is going to make that change.

So today, I want to set out my plan for a Britain where everyone plays by the same rules and every person has the opportunity to be all they want to be.

It’s a plan to tackle the unfairness and injustice that divides us, so that we may build a new united Britain, rooted in the centre ground.

A plan that will mean government stepping up. Righting wrongs. Challenging vested interests. Taking big decisions. Doing what we believe to be right. Getting the job done.

Because that’s the good that government can do. And it’s what I’m in this for. To stand up for the weak and stand up to the strong.

And to put the power of government squarely at the service of ordinary working-class people.

Because too often that isn’t how it works today.

Just listen to the way a lot of politicians and commentators talk about the public.

They find your patriotism distasteful, your concerns about immigration parochial, your views about crime illiberal, your attachment to your job security inconvenient.

They find the fact that more than seventeen million voters decided to leave the European Union simply bewildering.

Because if you’re well off and comfortable, Britain is a different country and these concerns are not your concerns. It’s easy to dismiss them – easy to say that all you want from government is for it to get out of the way.

But a change has got to come. It’s time to remember the good that government can do.

Time for a new approach that says while government does not have all the answers, government can and should be a force for good;

that the state exists to provide what individual people, communities and markets cannot;

and that we should employ the power of government for the good of the people.

Time to reject the ideological templates provided by the socialist left and the libertarian right and to embrace a new centre ground in which government steps up – and not back – to act on behalf of us all.

Providing security from crime, but from ill health and unemployment too.

Supporting free markets, but stepping in to repair them when they aren’t working as they should.

Encouraging business and supporting free trade, but not accepting one set of rules for some and another for everyone else.

And if we do – if we act to correct unfairness and injustice and put government at the service of ordinary working people – we can build that new united Britain in which everyone plays by the same rules, and in which the powerful and the privileged no longer ignore the interests of the people.

Only we can do it. Because the main lesson I take from their conference last week is that the Labour Party is not just divided, but divisive.

Determined to pit one against another. To pursue vendettas and settle scores. And to embrace the politics of pointless protest that simply pulls people further apart.

That’s what Labour stands for today. Fighting among themselves. Abusing their own MPs. Threatening to end their careers. Tolerating anti-Semitism and supporting voices of hate.

You know what some people call them?

The nasty party.

And with Labour divided, divisive and out-of-touch, we have a responsibility to step up, represent and govern for the whole nation.

So where Labour build barriers, we will build bridges.

That means tackling unfairness and injustice, and shifting the balance of Britain decisively in favour of ordinary working class people.

Giving them access to the opportunities that are too often the preserve of the privileged few.

Putting fairness at the heart of our agenda and creating a country in which hard work is rewarded and talent is welcome.

A nation where contribution matters more than entitlement. Merit matters more than wealth.

A confident global Britain that doesn’t turn its back on globalisation but ensures the benefits are shared by all.

A country that is prosperous and secure, so every person may share in the wealth of the nation and live their life free from fear.

That’s what I mean by a country that works for everyone.

And if we believe in the good that government can do, it’s important for people to trust us to deliver the change they need.

We can start – as I said on Sunday – by doing something obvious. And that is to stop quibbling, respect what the people told us on the 23rd of June – and take Britain out of the European Union.

Because it took that typically British quiet resolve for people to go out and vote as they did: to defy the establishment, to ignore the threats, to make their voice heard.

So let us have that same resolve now.

And let’s be clear about what is going to happen.

Article Fifty – triggered no later than the end of March.

A Great Repeal Bill to get rid of the European Communities Act – introduced in the next Parliamentary session.

Our laws made not in Brussels but in Westminster.

Our judges sitting not in Luxembourg but in courts across the land.

The authority of EU law in this country ended forever.

The people told us they wanted these things – and this Conservative Government is going to deliver them.

It is, of course, too early to say exactly what agreement we will reach with the EU. It’s going to be a tough negotiation, it will require some give and take. And while there will always be pressure to give a running commentary, it will not be in our national interest to do so. But let me be clear about the agreement we seek.

I want it to reflect the strong and mature relationships we enjoy with our European friends.

I want it to include cooperation on law enforcement and counter-terrorism work.

I want it to involve free trade, in goods and services.

I want it to give British companies the maximum freedom to trade with and operate within the Single Market – and let European businesses do the same here.

But let’s state one thing loud and clear: we are not leaving the European Union only to give up control of immigration all over again. And we are not leaving only to return to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. That’s not going to happen.

We are leaving to become, once more, a fully sovereign and independent country – and the deal is going to have to work for Britain.

And that Britain – the Britain we build after Brexit – is going to be a Global Britain.

Because while we are leaving the European Union, we will not leave the continent of Europe. We will not abandon our friends and allies abroad. And we will not retreat from the world.

In fact, now is the time to forge a bold, new, confident role for ourselves on the world stage.

Keeping our promises to the poorest people in the world.

Providing humanitarian support for refugees in need.

Taking the lead on cracking down on modern slavery wherever it is found.

Ratifying the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

Always acting as the strongest and most passionate advocate for free trade right across the globe.

And always committed to a strong national defence and supporting the finest Armed Forces known to man.

And this week, our excellent Defence Secretary, Michael Fallon, proved not only that we will support them with our hearts and souls. Not only will we remain committed to spending two per cent of our national income on defence.

But we will never again – in any future conflict – let those activist, left-wing human rights lawyers harangue and harass the bravest of the brave – the men and women of Britain’s Armed Forces.

It’s about restoring fairness – something that must be at the heart of everything we do. Supporting those who do the right thing, who make a contribution.

Helping those who give something back.

And that’s at the heart of my plan for our economy too.

An economy that’s fair and where everyone plays by the same rules.

That means acting to tackle some of the economy’s structural problems that hold people back.

Things like the shortage of affordable homes. The need to make big decisions on – and invest in – our infrastructure. The need to rebalance the economy across sectors and areas in order to spread wealth and prosperity around the country.

Politicians have talked about this for years. But the trouble is that this kind of change will never just happen by itself. If that’s what we want, we need the vision and determination to see it through.

That’s why Philip Hammond and Greg Clark are working on a new industrial strategy to address those long-term structural challenges and get Britain firing on all cylinders again.

It’s not about picking winners, propping up failing industries, or bringing old companies back from the dead.

It’s about identifying the industries that are of strategic value to our economy and supporting and promoting them through policies on trade, tax, infrastructure, skills, training, and research and development.

It’s about doing what every other major and growing economy in the world does.

Not just sitting back and seeing what happens – but putting in place a plan and getting on with the job.

So we will identify the sectors of the economy – financial services, yes, but life sciences, tech, aerospace, car manufacturing, the creative industries and many others – that are of strategic importance to our economy, and do everything we can to encourage, develop and support them.

And we will identify the places that have the potential to contribute to economic growth and become the homes to millions of new jobs.

That means inspiring an economic and cultural revival of all of our great regional cities.

We have made a start.

Thanks to George Osborne’s Northern Powerhouse, over the past year, foreign direct investment in the North has increased at double the rate of the rest of the country.

Here in Birmingham, thanks to the incredible Jaguar Land Rover, the West Midlands is the only part of the country to run a trade surplus with China.

And across the region, the Midlands Engine is on track to deliver 300,000 more jobs by 2020.

Now it’s time to build on that success – in Birmingham and Manchester and in other cities across the country.

And as we are here in Birmingham this week, let us show our support for the Conservative Party’s candidate for next year’s mayoral election.

A success in business running John Lewis. An action man in Birmingham, playing his part in transforming this city. A man to get things done, the future Mayor of the West Midlands – Andy Street.

An economy that works for everyone is an economy where everyone plays by the same rules.

I understand the frustration people feel when they see the rich and the powerful getting away with things that they themselves wouldn’t dream of doing. And they wouldn’t get away with if they tried.

I understand that because I feel it too.

There’s always an excuse – a reason why something can’t be done – but when that is used as a basis for inaction, faith in capitalism and free markets falls.

The Conservative Party will always believe in free markets. And that’s precisely why it’s this party that should act to defend them.

From Edmund Burke onwards, Conservatives have always understood that if you want to preserve something important, you need to be prepared to reform it. We must apply that same approach today.

That’s why where markets are dysfunctional, we should be prepared to intervene.

Where companies are exploiting the failures of the market in which they operate, where consumer choice is inhibited by deliberately complex pricing structures, we must set the market right.

It’s just not right, for example, that half of people living in rural areas, and so many small businesses, can’t get a decent broadband connection.

It’s just not right that two thirds of energy customers are stuck on the most expensive tariffs.

And it’s just not right that the housing market continues to fail working people either.

Ask almost any question about social fairness or problems with our economy, and the answer so often comes back to housing.

High housing costs – and the growing gap between those on the property ladder and those who are not – lie at the heart of falling social mobility, falling savings and low productivity.

We will do everything we can to help people financially so they can buy their own home. That’s why Help to Buy and Right to Buy are the right things to do.

But as Sajid said in his bold speech on Monday, there is an honest truth we need to address. We simply need to build more homes.

This means using the power of government to step in and repair the dysfunctional housing market.

It means using public sector land for more and faster house building.

It means encouraging new technologies that will help us to get more houses built faster. And putting in more government investment too.

It means stepping up and doing what’s right for Britain.

Making the market work for working people.

Because that’s what government can do.

And something else we need to do: take big, sometimes even controversial, decisions about our country’s infrastructure.

Because we need to get Britain firing in all areas again.

It is why we will press ahead with plans for High Speed 2, linking London and Birmingham and, eventually, towns and cities in the North.

Why we will shortly announce a decision on expanding Britain’s airport capacity.

And why – having reviewed the evidence and added important new national security safeguards – we signed up to Hinkley Point.

We will take the big decisions when they’re the right decisions for Britain.

Because that’s what government can do.

And we can make these big decisions because our economy is strong and because of the fiscal discipline we have shown over the last six years.

And we must continue to aim for a balanced budget.

But to build an economy that works for everyone, we must also invest in the things that matter, the things with a long-term return.

That is how we will address the weaknesses in our economy, improve our productivity, increase economic growth and ensure everyone gets a fair share.

And that’s not the only reason.

Because while monetary policy – with super-low interest rates and quantitative easing – provided the necessary emergency medicine after the financial crash, we have to acknowledge there have been some bad side effects.

People with assets have got richer. People without them have suffered. People with mortgages have found their debts cheaper. People with savings have found themselves poorer.

A change has got to come. And we are going to deliver it.

Because that’s what a Conservative Government can do.

This party will always be the party of businesses large and small.

But we must acknowledge that the way a small number of businesses behave fuels the frustration people feel.

It’s not the norm. I know that most businesses and the people who run them are hardworking, entrepreneurial and public spirited at heart.

But the actions of a few tar the reputations of the many.

So the party that believes in business is going to change things to help support it.

Too often the people who are supposed to hold big business accountable are drawn from the same, narrow social and professional circles as the executive team.

And too often the scrutiny they provide is not good enough.

A change has got to come.

So later this year we will publish our plans to have not just consumers represented on company boards, but workers as well.

Because we are the party of workers. Of those who put in the effort. Those who contribute and give of their best.

That’s why we announced on Saturday that we’re going to review our laws to make sure that, in our modern and flexible economy, people are properly protected at work.

That’s right.

Workers’ rights – not under threat from a Conservative government.

Workers’ rights – protected and enhanced by a Conservative government.

And let me say something about tax.

We’re all Conservatives here. We all believe in a low-tax economy. But we also know that tax is the price we pay for living in a civilised society.

Nobody, no individual tycoon and no single business, however rich, has succeeded on their own.

Their goods are transported by road, their workers are educated in schools, their customers are part of sophisticated networks taking in the private sector, the public sector and charities.

We’ve all played a part in that success.

So it doesn’t matter to me who you are.

If you’re a tax-dodger, we’re coming after you.

If you’re an accountant, a financial adviser or a middleman who helps people to avoid what they owe to society, we’re coming after you too.

An economy that works for everyone is one where everyone plays by the same rules.

So whoever you are you – however rich or powerful – you have a duty to pay your tax.

And we’re going to make sure you do.

This is a big agenda for change. But it is necessary and essential.

It is a programme for government to act to create an economy that works for everyone – an economy that’s on the side of ordinary working class people.

And an economy that can support the vital public services and institutions upon which we all rely – to invest in the things we hold dear.

Like the NHS – one of the finest health care systems anywhere in the world, and a vital national institution.

An institution that reflects our values, our belief in fairness, and in which we all take enormous pride.

And I mean all.

Because there is complete cross-party support for the NHS.

For its status as a provider of free-at-the-point-of-use health care. For the thousands of doctors and nurses that work around the clock to care for their patients.

We all have a story about the nurse who cared for a loved one, or a surgeon who saved the life of a friend.

So let us take this opportunity to say to those doctors and nurses – thank you.

The NHS should unite us. But year after year, election after election, Labour try to use it to divide us.

At every election since it was established, Labour have said the Tories would cut the NHS – and every time we have spent more on it.

Every election, they say we want to privatise the NHS – and every time we have protected it.

In fact, the party that expanded the use of the private sector in the NHS the fastest was not this party, but the Labour Party.

The only party to ever cut spending on the NHS is not this party, but the Labour Party – that’s what they did in Wales.

And at the last election, it wasn’t the Labour Party that pledged to give the NHS the money it asked for to meet its five-year plan – it was this party, the Conservative Party…

investing an extra £10 billion in the NHS – more than its leaders asked for…

and this year more patients are being treated, and more operations are being carried out, by more doctors and more nurses than ever before.

That’s a tribute to everyone who works in the NHS.

But also to one man – Jeremy Hunt – who is one of the most passionate advocates for patients and for the doctors, nurses and others who work in our health service that I have ever known.

So let’s have no more of Labour’s absurd belief that they have a monopoly on compassion.

Let’s put an end to their sanctimonious pretence of moral superiority.

Let’s make clear that they have given up the right to call themselves the party of the NHS, the party of the workers, the party of public servants.

They gave up that right when they adopted the politics of division. When their extreme ideological fixations led them to simply stop listening to the country.

When they abandoned the centre ground.

And let us take this opportunity to show that we, the Conservative Party, truly are the party of the workers…

the party of public servants…

the party of the NHS.

Because we believe in public service. We believe in investing in and supporting the institutions that make our country great.

We believe in the good that government can do.

Government cannot stand aside when it sees social injustice and unfairness. If we want to make sure Britain is a country that works for everyone, government has to act to make sure opportunity is fairly shared.

And I want us to be a country where it doesn’t matter where you were born, who your parents are, where you went to school, what your accent sounds like, what god you worship, whether you’re a man or a woman, gay or straight, or black or white.

All that should matter is the talent you have and how hard you’re prepared to work.

But if we’re honest we’ll admit that’s simply not the case for everyone today.

Advancement in today’s Britain is still too often determined by wealth or circumstance.

By an accident of birth rather than talent.

By privilege not merit.

Rebalancing our economy is a start, but if we’re serious about overturning some of the longstanding injustices and barriers that stop working people from getting on, we need that economic reform to be allied with genuine and deep social reform too.

Because a society that works for everyone is a society based on fairness. And only genuine social reform can deliver it.

Genuine social reform means helping more people onto the housing ladder. It means making sure every child has access to a good school place.

It means never writing off people who can work and consigning them to a life on benefits, but giving them the chance to go out and earn a living and to enjoy the dignity that comes with a job well done.

But for those who can’t work, we must offer our full support – which is why it was so important that Damian Green announced on Saturday that we will end the mandatory retesting of those with chronic health conditions that only induces stress but does nothing at all to help.

And genuine social reform means addressing historic injustices that hold too many people back.

Some of my proudest moments as Home Secretary came when we began to tackle deep-seated and long-standing problems that few had dared to tackle before.

I introduced the first ever Modern Slavery Act, bringing in tough new penalties to put slave masters behind bars, with life sentences for the worst offenders.

I cut the police’s use of stop and search by almost two thirds and reduced the disproportionate targeting of young, black men.

And I know our impressive new Home Secretary Amber Rudd is committed to carrying on that work.

But injustices remain.

If you are from a black Caribbean background, you are three times more likely to be permanently excluded from school than other children.

If you are a black woman, you are seven times more likely to be detained under mental health legislation than a white woman.

People in ethnic minority households are almost twice as likely to live in relative poverty as white people.

But it is not just those from minority backgrounds who are affected.

White working class boys are less likely to go to university than any other group in society.

We cannot let this stand – not if a country that works for everyone is the principle that binds us all together.

That’s why I have launched an unprecedented audit of public services to shine a light on these racial disparities and let us do something about them.

Because they are all burning injustices, and I want this government – this Conservative Government – to fight every single one of them.

A society that works for everyone is one of fairness and opportunity. A society in which everyone has the chance to go as far as their talents will take them.

That’s why in one of the first speeches I gave as Prime Minister I set out my plans to transform Britain into a Great Meritocracy.

And that starts in our schools.

I want Britain to be a country in which every child has access to a good school place that’s right for that individual child.

Because Britain after Brexit will need to make use of all of the talent we have in this country.

We have come a long way.

Thanks to the free schools and academies programme and the efforts of teachers, heads and governors, there are now 1.4 million more children in good and outstanding schools compared with 2010.

But we need to go further. Because there are still one and a quarter million children in schools that are just not good enough.

And if you live in the Midlands or the North, you have less chance of attending a good school than children in the South.

This simply cannot go on.

That’s why Justine Greening and I have set out a new package of reforms, building on Michael Gove’s success, to increase the number of good school places across the country… so there’s not just a school place for every child, but a good school place for every child. A school place that suits the skills, interests and abilities of every single pupil.

That is why we want more of our great universities to set up or sponsor schools in the state sector – just as the University of Birmingham has done, a few miles from here.

It’s why we are saying to the great private schools that – in return for their charitable tax status – we want them to do more to take on children without the means to pay, or set up and sponsor good state schools.

It is why we want more good faith schools for parents and pupils who want them.

And it is why we have said – where there is demand from parents, where they will definitely take pupils from all backgrounds, where they will play a part in improving the quality of all schools in their area – we will lift the ban on establishing new grammar schools too.

And here we see the challenge.

Because for too long politicians have said to people and communities who are crying out for change that they can’t have what they want.

They’ve said we don’t think you should have it, even though we might enjoy those very same things for ourselves.

And you end up in the absurd situation where you stop these good, popular, life-changing schools from opening – by law.

Imagine. Think of what that says.

If you’re rich or well off, you can have a selective education for your child. You can send them to a selective private school. You can move to a better catchment area or afford to send them long distances to get the education you want.

But if you’re not, you can’t.

I can think of no better illustration of the problem – why ordinary working class people think it’s one rule for them, and another for everyone else.

Because the message we are sending them is this: we will not allow their children to have the same opportunities that wealthier children enjoy.

That is a scandal and we – the Conservative Party – must bring it to an end.

So my vision is for Britain to be a Great Meritocracy.

That’s what I’ve always believed in. The cause that everything I have ever done in politics has been designed to serve.

Because a country based on merit not privilege, is a country that’s fair. And when we overcome unfairness and injustice, we can build that new united Britain that we need.

And united, we can do great things.

We saw that in the summer in Rio. We saw how individual success was powered by collective effort. How the dedication and talent of one was supported by a united team.

And how a government’s determination – John Major’s Conservative Government’s determination – to step up and back Britain’s sporting success contributed to such a remarkable result.

We were honoured to welcome four members of the team – Helen Richardson-Walsh, Dame Sarah Storey, Vicky Thornley and Andrew Triggs-Hodge – to our conference on Monday.

And to them – and to every athlete and every member of Team and Paralympics GB – we say, thank you. You did your country proud.

It was a memorable summer for British sport, but one moment stood out for me above all other.

It was not from Rio. It happened later. Just a couple of weeks ago on the sun-drenched streets of Cozumel in Mexico.

There, our celebrated triathlon champion Jonny Brownlee was heading for glory, the finishing line in sight, when he faltered. Stopped. And was falling exhausted to the ground.

And just behind him, his brother Alistair – a tough competitor who typically yields to no one – had the chance to run on and steal the prize.

But seeing his brother’s struggle, he didn’t pass on by. As other competitors ran past, he stopped. Reached out his hand. And gently carried him home.

And there in that moment, we saw revealed an essential truth. That we succeed or fail together. We achieve together or fall short together.

And when one among us falters, our most basic human instinct is to put our own self-interest aside, to reach out our hand and help them over the line.

That’s why the central tenet of my belief is that there is more to life than individualism and self-interest.

We form families, communities, towns, cities, counties and nations. We have a responsibility to one another.

And I firmly believe that government has a responsibility too.

It is to act to encourage and nurture those relationships, networks and institutions – and to step up to correct injustices and tackle unfairness where it can – because these are the things that can drive us apart.

That’s why I say today – as I have always said – that my mission – and the mission of this party – is to build a country that truly works for everyone, not just the privileged few.

It’s why when I stood on the steps of Number 10 for the first time as Prime Minister 84 days ago, I said that the Government I lead will be driven not by the interests of the rich and powerful, but by the interests of ordinary, working class people.

And this week, we have shown the country that we mean business.

Not just protecting, but enhancing workers’ rights.

Building an economy that’s fair, where everyone plays by the same rules.

Getting more houses built. More doctors in the NHS.

Investing in things that will make our economy grow.

Hundreds of great new schools. Universities and fee-paying schools helping state schools to improve.

And yes, where parents want them and where they’ll improve standards for children of whatever background – the first new grammar schools to open in England for fifty years.

This is a bold plan to bring Britain together. To build a new united Britain, rooted in the centre ground.

An agenda for a new modern Conservatism. That understands the good government can do. That will never hesitate to face down the powerful when they abuse their positions of privilege.

That will always act in the interests of ordinary, working class people.

That’s what government’s about: action. It’s about doing something, not being someone.

About identifying injustices, finding solutions, driving change. Taking, not shirking, the big decisions. Having the courage to see things through.

It’s not always glamorous or exciting, but at its best it’s a noble calling.

And where many just see government as the problem, I want to show it can be part of the solution too.

And I know this to be true.

For as I leave the door of my office at Number 10, I pass that famous staircase – the portraits of prime ministers past lined up along the wall.

Men – and of course one woman – of consequence, who have steered this country through difficult times – and changed it for the better too.

There’s Disraeli, who saw division and worked to heal it. Churchill, who confronted evil and had the strength to overcome. Attlee, with the vision to build a great national institution. And Lady Thatcher who taught us we could dream great dreams again.

Those portraits remind me of the good that government can do.

That nothing good comes easy.

But with courage and vision and determination you can always see things through.

And as I pass them every day, I remember that our nation has been shaped by those who stepped up to be counted when the big moments came.

Such opportunities are rare, but we face such a moment today.

A moment that calls us to respond and to reshape our nation once again.

Not every generation is given this opportunity.

Not every generation called to step up in such a way.

But this is our generation’s moment.

To write a new future upon the page.

To bring power home and make decisions… here in Britain.

To take back control and shape our future… here in Britain.

To build an outward looking, confident, trading nation… here in Britain.

To build a stronger, fairer, brighter future… here in Britain.

That is the opportunity we have been given.

And the responsibility to grasp it falls upon us all.

So to everyone here this morning – and the millions beyond whether leavers or remain – I say:

Come with me and we’ll write that brighter future.

Come with me and we’ll make that change.

Come with me as we rise to meet this moment.

Come with me and together let’s seize the day.

Well I’ve come to the conclusion that politicians practice how to tell porkies with a straight-faced to the electorate, it can be difficult to work out where they stand and who they represent.

An innocent arriving in Britain from another country, or perhaps a distant galaxy, could be forgiven for accepting at face value Theresa May’s claim that the Tories are now “truly the party of the workers, the party of the NHS, the party of public servants.”

Her insistence that Britain will become a “great meritocracy” based on fairness and opportunity has echoes of the early years of Tony Blair.

Similarly, the Tory leader’s warning to the “big six” energy companies that she will intervene “where markets are dysfunctional” smacks of Ed Miliband’s pledge to “reset” the energy market. May didn’t emulate Miliband in threatening to impose a temporary tariff freeze, but her admirers applauded her comments nonetheless.

The Prime Minister must have been listening to speeches by Jeremy Corbyn or John McDonnell as she sympathised with working-class people frustrated over unaffordable housing, stagnating wages and insecure jobs and put employers on notice that not looking after staff or allowing pension funds to go bust “can’t go on any more.”

Into her list of working-class complaints she slipped in “pay undercut by low-skilled immigrants.”

It may have escaped her notice that immigrants of whatever skill level do not lay down pay rates. Employers do, while government sets the legal minimum wage.

And yet, in sad contrast to the glaring absence of proposals to tackle housing, low pay, secure jobs and so on, she made dealing with foreign-born workers a priority.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd floated a proposal on Tuesday that companies could be compelled to reveal the number of staff members born outside Britain to shame them into employing more British-born workers and reducing immigration.

The impact of this bullying on workplace relations aside, what if birthplace disparities aren’t easily discernible? Perhaps employees could have, as a condition of employment, to wear a tasteful addition to their clothing such as a nicely embroidered star, with different colours for various categories of workers. Who could possibly object?

Rudd’s revolting proposal has nothing to do with improving skills or employment prospects for British-born workers.

It is a deliberately divisive ploy to set workers at each other’s throats, make Britain a less hospitable place for people wishing to settle here and gain votes for the Tory Party among racists and xenophobes.

It is 14 years since May noted that many voters saw the Tories as the “nasty party,” in view of its hostility to the poor, claimants, racial minorities and LGBT people.

She is now trying a con-trick of global proportions by pinning that epithet on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour, claiming that her Tory government will stand up for the weak against the strong.

Anyone tempted to believe that this leopard has changed her spots might ask themselves why the CBI bosses’ organisation and all May’s ministers who previously backed David Cameron and George Osborne’s capitalist austerity policies are right behind her.

They know that May’s rhetoric about workers, the NHS and public services is empty. It’s window dressing for the hard of thinking. The only positive aspect of her verbal lurch to the left is that she understands the attraction to voters of the new approach pushed by Corbyn and McDonnell.

Their commitment to social justice isn’t confined to conference speeches. It’s a daily reality that puts May’s political dishonesty to shame.

Conservatives should pay their own policing of conference from their fatcat friends


Here is a political broadcast for all to see:

Firstly, in solidarity with all who attended the pro-European protest march in London, calling for our nation to be strengthening its ties to the continent following the brexit vote. Our aim was to continue to apply pressure on the government to delay activating the formal process of leaving the European Union (EU).
I don’t normally concur with Ice Queen Theresa May but she does raise a point when she says “Britain needs to prepare for some difficult times” ahead as it leaves the European Union. This will not be plain sailing for the UK and that talks will be held in 2017 and that the process would not kicked into the long grass. However I don’t believe Ice Queen May rules out having snap general elections.

No surprise that the establishment will have to hire extra civil servants to cope with the “phenomenally large task” of negotiation brexit, a former top Foreign Office diplomat has said. Sir Simon Fraser was a trade negotiator in Europe and permanent under-secretary at the Foreign Office and he is also quoted “serious thinking has barely began on the substantive issue”.

I’m glad that Ice Queen Theresa May acknowledged she has had a difficult start to the G20 summit as President Barack Obama said the UK would not be the priority for a US trade deal and Japan issued an unprecedented 15-page warning about the consequences of Brexit.

The prime minister had been hoping to pitch the UK as a global leader in free trade during her first major outing on the world stage at the G20 in summit in Hangzhou. However, she was immediately confronted with harsh warnings about the consequences of leaving the EU and diplomatic tensions with the Chinese over her concerns about their involvement in UK nuclear power.

After her first bilateral meeting with Obama, May was warned that the US wanted to focus on trade negotiations with the EU and a bloc of pacific nations before considering a deal with the UK. This was swiftly followed by a message from Japan to the UK that there could be a string of corporate exits from the UK unless some of the privileges that come with access to the single market are maintained.

The lengthy document from Tokyo gives a list of possible consequences of Brexit and a series of specific requests from Japanese businesses. About half of Japanese investment in the EU comes to the UK, including from companies such as Nissan, Honda, Mitsubishi, Nomura and Daiwa.

“Japanese businesses with their European headquarters in the UK may decide to transfer their head-office function to continental Europe if EU laws cease to be applicable in the UK after its withdrawal,” the report concludes.

It says: “In light of the fact that a number of Japanese businesses, invited by the government in some cases, have invested actively to the UK, which was seen to be a gateway to Europe, and have established value-chains across Europe, we strongly request that the UK will consider this fact seriously and respond in a responsible manner to minimise any harmful effects on these businesses.”

Earlier, Obama had promised to work hard to stop “adverse effects” of Brexit and assured the UK there was still a “very special relationship” between the two nations.

But he also raised the risk of some trading relations unraveling and made clear that it “would not make sense to put aside” existing negotiations with big blocs of countries in order to do an immediate deal with the UK.

Asked whether he stood by his warnings against Brexit and claim that Britain would go to the back of the queue when it comes to trade deals, Obama repeated his belief that the world would benefit from the UK being a member of the EU.

“I’ve committed to Theresa that we will consult closely with her as she and her government move forward on Brexit negotiations to make sure we don’t see adverse effects in our trading and commercial relationship. Obviously there is an enormous amount of trade that already takes place … That is not going to stop. And we are going to do everything we can to make sure the consequences of the decision don’t end up unravelling what is already a very strong and robust economic relationship.

“But first things first. The first task is figuring out what Brexit means with respect to Europe. And our first task is making sure we go forward on TTIP negotiations in which we have already invested a lot of time and effort.”

It comes after the prime minister warned on her flight to China that there would be “difficult times ahead” for the economy after leaving the EU.

The prime minister said the economy was in better shape than some had predicted following the vote for Brexit. However, May said she was not expecting an easy ride, as her ministers examine the possibility of a “fiscal reset” at the autumn statement – potentially abandoning some of the financial strategies and targets of former chancellor George Osborne.

Hey folks, it’s no surprise to read that Nick Clegg (Bed partner of David Cameron) spelling the beans on the former chancellor George Osborne of seeing welfare as a “bottomless pit of savings just to cut benefits to boost the Conservatives popularity”. This is in light of number focus groups suggested potential Tory voters were anti-welfare. He also claims that social housing created Labour voters. It’s no wonder the Conservatives are punishing desperate families by refusing to build more council housing. See article on my blog entitled Satire: shortage of housing and homelessness.

https://gordonlyew.wordpress.com/2016/09/02/satire-shortage-of-housing-and-homelessness/

Nobody likes to go on strike, this is a last resort especially when it comes at the time of austerity, I refer to our junior doctors five day strikes in England. Sure I make no apologies for saying I’m in solidarity with our junior doctors. Put yourself in their position, you have a contract that you were better than the new one would you hold on to it and fight tooth and nail to keep it or will you take on a new contract that will less attractive and more workload with less pay which one will you keep. The British Medical Association Members (BMA) voted to keep the current contract and the establishment decided to pull the rug under them what would you do. On August 31 the BMA council voted to endorse a programme of further industrial action, proposed by the junior doctors committee (JDC), just weeks before the first group of junior doctors are to be faced with the new contract. Strike action is planned for October, November and December.

Consultants and others medics not classified as junior doctors will be staffing the NHS, as was the case during strike action taken earlier this year, in order to ensure our patients are not left without medical assistance.

The media spin is once again in overdrive and on cue to portray junior doctors as reckless anarchists who are striking to the detriment of patients in order to score political points.

One does not need a medical degree to figure out that individuals who make immense sacrifices to get into and through medical school, to be followed upon graduation by further sacrifices to their free time, comfort, social and family lives (to the extent that their own physical and mental health sometimes suffers) in order to care for the sick, would suddenly choose to put patients at risk and lose a week’s pay while doing so. Junior doctors, like most other people, are only a pay cheque or two away from being unable to pay their mortgages or rent or put food on the table.  

I also use the NHS, as do my friends and family. As anyone who has visited a hospital during the weekend will tell you, a seven-day NHS already exists, albeit one staffed by overworked and overstretched staff.

Jeremy Hunt’s claim, based upon carefully chosen statistics, which an additional 6,000 annual deaths occur during the weekend, has been soundly debunked. Furthermore, a report leaked by the Department of Health earlier this year indicated that there was no evidence that increased staffing levels on weekends would actually reduce mortality among patients admitted during those days, removing a linchpin from Hunt’s argument that extra staff are needed.

The report also showed that if hospitals are to function on weekends, as they do Monday to Friday, an additional 11,000 staff (including doctors and nurses) would be required, on top of an annual cost of £900 million.

Further evidence indicating junior doctors are already overstretched is provided by the Mind the Rota Gap study which showed that in London, as across the rest of England, there is a massive shortage of junior doctors.

This often results in extra work being piled upon existing medics or gaps in rotas not being filled.

Further depleting existing junior doctor numbers Monday to Friday, in order to spread us out across the whole week, will not only put patients at risk during the first five days of the week but will also not reduce weekend mortality.

We all want to give our existing and potential patients, which include ourselves, our colleagues and our families, the very best possible care but we desperately need the additional staff and funding to do so.
Otherwise the NHS is being set up to fail in order to usher in a system of private healthcare, perhaps even a US-style healthcare system complete with the shortcomings for those unable to afford what is surely a human right.

I don’t know whether to laugh or cry it’s been purported the establishment should ignore calls to limit future increase to the national living wage a think tank said. The Living Wage of £7:20 per hour was introduced in April, benefiting more than a million staff aged 25 and over. Some business organisations have been lobbying the government to restrain future increases in hourly rate.

It’s been rumoured that a construction of a UK funding a Great Wall near Calais. It will be 13 feet wall will run for 6 miles along both sides of the main road to Calais port. This does rings some alarm bells and reminds me of the Great Wall of China to keep illegal immigrants during the Ming period.

Like or loath Mark Carney he has hit the nail on the head, no doubt the Leave Campaigner want their pound of flesh as he defended his action to mitigate the impact of Brexit. He said “Timely, comprehensive and concrete” action, which acted to “support cushion and help the economy to adjust”. Last month’s rate to cut to an historic low of 0.25% helped support house prices and the wider economy, he added. He further added he was “absolutely serene” about the Bank’s preparations for the impact from the Brexit vote.

Since David Cameron stepped down as Prime Minister after 6 years it has been alleged that enough local authority places to resettle 20,000 Syrian refugees over the next four years have now been secured. U.K. was on track to deliver on the promise by the previous prime minister. A total of 10 million has been pledged for language tuition to help refugees integrate. I bet my last pound that the likes of BritianFirst, UKIP, and BNP will be happy with this statement as they are more incline to send them back to their homes in the war torn country. Hope not hate is my message to those ignorant people.

I’m glad that Ice Queen Theresa May has begun to cast doubt on the feasibility of a points-based system for controlling immigration into the UK, one of the key promises of Leave campaigners during the EU referendum. She acknowledged people had voted for more control on the numbers of people moving to UK will work.

Here is something to remember what Theresa May said at the Police Federation Conference:

It is alleged that hate crime prosecutions in England and Wales fell by 10% last year even though the number of recorded incidents increased, figures have suggested. Freedom of information figures suggest hate crimes increased by 20% last year to more than 60,000 yet police referrals to prosecutors fell by 1,379. Experts say hate crimes are now at a more predictable level since the spike was reported around the EU referendum. If I’m honest I think if the Conservatives had their way they would be more than happy to get rid of freedom of information (FOI). Give thanks and praises for a Labour Government for introducing the act.

Conference, conference, oh before Labour delegates starts to get into panic mode I’m not referring to the Labour Conference. I’m simply referring to the Conservative Conference in Birmingham which will be held at the International Conference Centre for the next three years and to add insult to injury it’s the West Midlands Police has to folk out the sum of £1.5 million for safety operations. It’s estimated around £500,000 a timeworn the Fatcats meets in Birmingham in October and return in 2018, and 2020.

I understand that the Police Crime Commissioner has written to the Home Secretary Amber Rodd to ask for a discussion about a “fairer arrangement”.

As much one disagree that the West Midlands Police having to pay for this expensive junket in my opinion it should come out the Conservative budget. The money spent could be put to more use by recruiting more bobby on the beat. Yes, I like a good moan too and when I look around in the West Midlands Region with the increase in foodbanks and poverty in place and across the United Kingdom the establishment lives in their own bubble in the Westminster Village. The next time you speak to or visit your local councillors, Member of European and member Parliaments ask them what they have done to help feed the homeless and needy in their ward and constituency.

Satire: Conservatives would rather you forget,cheer up old chaps


Who remembers this youtube. Oh by the way there is no shame to say I did not see this:

 

 

 

Compliments of Jeremy Hunt this happening on your watch let’s see you get out this one firstly you tell all of us to work like Chinese when you had to retract your statement. Then you try to force though your unworkable contracts with junior doctors and refuse to meet up with angry junior doctors. What a month it must have been for you then event that you had to attend had to be cancelled in fear having to speak to junior doctors who were willing to pay their £15:00 to attend the event to put some questions to him what a chicken he is with no conviction to man up to them. Hang on I’m sure after forcing the junior doctors to accept their contracts the next on the list would be the consultants, nurses, porters, cleaners and the list goes on and on. The chickens have come home to roost and he is running as fast as he can to the next conservative association.

See articles below:

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/oct/05/hunt-tax-credit-cuts-make-britons-work-like-chinese-or-americans

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/feb/14/jeremy-hunt-ethical-columnist-nightmare-junior-doctors-dispute-impose-contract?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/feb/14/junior-doctors-jeremy-hunt-conservatives-event-fareham?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H&utm_term=156774&subid=12019543&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/nhs-hospitals-pressured-to-cook-the-books-and-underplay-scale-of-their-deficits-says-whistleblower-a6875521.html

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/nhs-111-service-investigated-over-allegations-17-year-olds-answered-urgent-calls-a6876541.html

If you concur that Jeremy Hunt must go please sign this petition:

https://www.change.org/p/jeremy-hunt-mp-jeremy-hunt-must-not-impose-new-contracts-on-junior-doctors/share?tk=MYtfBzNrpNWQrn1rFVxt25doOf00rqMW6omwhjqXxc4&utm_source=supporter_signature_milestone_email&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=supporter_signatures_75000&utm_term=supporter_signature_milestone_email

 

The Conservative Party is the party of personal responsibility. They pride themselves on telling people to pull themselves up by their bootstraps and jolly well get on their bikes to improve their lives. They love a bit of personal responsibility, just not personally you understand. They are completely incapable of taking any responsibility for the outcomes of their actions. Instead trotting out the same old “what we inherited from the Labour Party”.

I expect no difference with the Conservatives as they only put the lives of the most vulnerable at risk, because your silly party happened to be in power during a global recession.” Seriously Tories pack it in, go to your bedrooms, sit in the corner and have a word with yourselves. David Cameron and Jeremy Hunt make choices, simple as that. They have been making them for six years and they should take responsibility for them and stop blaming others like petulant junior doctors, nurses, and health workers. So, yes, when people commit suicide because of bedroom tax it is David Cameron and Iain Duncan Smith’s fault as it happen to be their watch. When both David Cameron and Jeremy Hunt stands in the way of sex and relationship education reaching as many kids as it can, it is their fault when kids don’t know enough to protect themselves from abusers or where to go if they are victims. Yes, when hundreds of doctors and nurses walk out on strike it is his choices that meant your appointment was cancelled. It will be their fault too when the dangerous working practices of junior doctors kill people. They are more than happy to take credit for the good stuff you do. They’ll whip your personal responsibility away from you the second you get a job, or your kid gets an A at school. They will stand and say, “thanks to me, education is improving and unemployment is falling.”

Checkout this the conservatives want to be in power for a generation, and are fixing the system to make that happen. The Trade Union Bill includes a clause that is deliberately designed to cut off trade unions’ financial support for the Labour Party – while doing nothing to limit the hedge funds and millionaires that support the Tories.

Not enough people know about what the Tories are trying to do, so it’s up to us to get the message out there. That’s why we’re asking if you could take two minutes to help us spread the word in your community.

We’ve created a quick and easy online tool so you can send a letter to your local newspaper’s letters page, outlining the attack on democracy that the Tories are planning. Will you help spread the word by writing to your local paper?

http://action.unionstogether.org.uk/letter

In another intriguing development Charles Walker said claims by Channel 4 News that some bills were not included in local spending returns during three 2014 by-elections and in Thanet South in May’s election should be examined.

A Labour by-election candidate has urged police to investigate.

The Tories say all their spending was recorded in accordance with the law.

Channel 4 News said it had obtained hotel bills which suggest the party broke electoral rules in the Newark, Clacton and Rochester & Strood by-elections, the first of which the Conservatives won and the other two it lost to UKIP.

Campaign spending in by-elections is limited to £100,000 for each party But Channel 4 News says it has uncovered £56,866.75 of undeclared hotel bills in Rochester, which would have taken the party £53,659.83 over the £100,000 limit.

It found bills totalling £26,786.14 in Clacton, which would have taken the party £10,835.36 over the limit, and receipts totalling £10,459.30 in Newark, which would mean an overspend of £6,650.28.

Charles Walker, the Tory MP for Broxbourne, told Channel 4 News that the matter should be examined.

“I’m going to raise it at the board but I suspect others will be raising it at the board. These are serious allegations,” he said.

“I’m not diminishing the nature of these allegations. But the Conservative Party believes it has complied with election law.”

“Channel 4 appear to be in possession of documents which raise questions relating to spending by the Conservative Party during the 2014 Newark by-election; the questions raised allegedly relate to spending that appears not to have been declared,” he wrote.

“I am seeking assurance this evidence and matter will be investigated, and if necessary referred to the appropriate authorities in order to reassure the residents of Newark constituency that established electoral laws and procedures, which are designed to protect our democracy, have been complied with.”

Nottinghamshire Police are yet to respond to the letter.

A spokesman for the Electoral Commission said it was aware of the allegations.

“Alleged breaches of the rules around candidate spending at by-elections or parliamentary general elections are matters for the police to investigate under the Representation of the People Act 1983,” he said.

A Conservative spokeswoman said: “All by-election spending has been correctly recorded in accordance with the law.”

I’m I going senile is Iain Duncan Smith reportedly demanded that those in receipt of benefits be removed from the electoral register, according to a letter leaked to the press. The Work and Pensions Secretary justified his request by arguing that it is unfair that people not currently paying into the system, either through working or by being high net wealth individuals, should be allowed to have a say in how public money is spent. His letter to the Prime Minister went on to suggest that withdrawing the right to vote in this way, would provide a “much needed incentive for the workshy, ill and disabled to find work”, and for those in work to stay “in work and off benefits”. The letter also questioned whether those under the age of 25, who tend to be “more prone to idealism”, ought to be permitted to vote, albeit with a possible exception “for members of the Young Conservatives.”

There is speculation in Westminster that the timing of this letter is related to the upcoming referendum on whether the UK should leave the EU, and a possible snap general election that some are predicting to take place thereafter. In this context, barring voters who are the least likely to vote for ‘Brexit or for the Conservative Party, may be seen by some as a useful measure.

A DWP spokeswoman refused to comment directly on the leaked letter, but told reporters: “Iain Duncan Smith believes that in a perfect world everybody would be able to enjoy a full suite of human rights, but with rights come responsibilities, and some rights should only be granted to those who have paid-in.”

Now we have at last, it’s called the in and out referendum the date has been set for 23 June 2016 right after the Local Government, London Mayoral, Scottish Parliament, Welsh Assembly, and Police Crime Commissioner Elections. I seem to recall that some of us have been down this road before it was back in 1975 otherwise called Common Market which some of us were a wee nipper and didn’t have a vote or were not born then.

The argument back in the 1975 referendum was the Common Market see link below:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single_market

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_Kingdom_European_Communities_membership_referendum,_1975

Who said these two weeks ago?

“In favour of staying, it is in Britain’s geo-strategic interests to be pretty intimately engaged in the doings of a continent that has a grim 20th-century history, and whose agonies have caused millions of Britons to lose their lives … [Leaving] would dismay some of our closest friends, not least the eastern Europeans for whom the EU has been a force for good: stability, openness, and prosperity.”

The Boris lies are at full flow but the last people he is concerned of is the British people. His stunt is all about him and him wanting to be PM. He will say anything and hope the British people are gullible in not looking close at what he says.

The reasons Boris is not standing for London Mayor again is because he knows he will lose. Londoners have seen through the shame pretense that he cares about their lives. So now he wants to con the rest of the nation and fool them into thinking he speaks sense. Well he does not, he never has. Acting like a bumbling idiot does not make him a towering personality, it just means he is deceptive and a con man. He is no idiot but he hopes many of the public are.

The EU matters to the UK, Boris and his ego do not. The issues for staying in the EU outweigh any gripe he has.

Would David Cameron ever demand such a move? No! He is too busy along with Osborne helping Google and other multinationals avoid tax! Well thankfully the EU is not so obliging. Europe matters because it has clout and can make a difference.

Finance Ministers from world leading economies have warned of alleged of shock to the global economy if the UK leaves the EU. The ministers gave their opinions in a statement released at the end of a two day meeting of G20 nations in China.

http://news.sky.com/story/1649951/pm-threatened-with-leadership-challenge-over-eu

As all the political party lobby for our votes let’s not forget there will be further cuts on the Horizon courtesy of the chancellor of the exchanger(George Osborne) for public spending in next month(March) budget.

This comes as the global economic turmoil and slow growth meant “We may need to undertake further reductions”.

It’s further alleged he slowed the pace of cuts in the last spending review, but suggested saving could be announced on 16 March Budget as figures showed the UK economy was smaller than expected.

Leaving the EU would be a total disaster; it makes no sense to walk away from having influence on a world scale. Jobs and living standards will suffer and the UK will be seen as no longer relevant by the US.

We as a nation get far more back then we put in and the idea that it would be wonderful if we were on our own is just not true. The UK is no longer an empire it is one small Island joined with a handful of others from a distant past. It needs the EU or the nation will forever lose out.

Let’s not be like Scotland and the SNP who want to govern a small piece of land yet have no answers to how when there is little money. Let’s not listen to Eurosceptic MPs and the biased press and the agenda of Europe hating Murdoch! Those views are based on self-greed or a misguided view that Britain still rules the waves.

Europe equals fairness in working rights and dignity, animal welfare protection and law, environmental protection, international crime detection with more ability to stop global crime. It means billions and billions in the UK on infrastructure and regeneration. It means the UK has a voice!

Let’s not throw that away on hearsay and made up rubbish in the press!

If I thought that Farage would disband and UKRAP would be no more, I would vote NO. However that would just disperse the bigots and send them into hiding and even disperse them where they might be absorbed into other Mainstream parties again. No!! Because I like to know where my enemy is and see the flag he/she marches under, I’ll stick with a YES at present

Here is what the Conservatives have to fail to mention again see youtube below:

 

 

“Instead of cutting the funding for charities that provide the most cost effective solutions to the increasing demand, why not invest prudently in a well-resourced health and social care system that actually works for the benefit of those that need it, whatever their condition” he asked. David Cameron dodged talks yesterday with the leaders of European political parties opposed to benefits cuts for migrant workers.

The Prime Minister was due to meet the European Parliament’s conference of presidents, which includes the leaders of all political groups.

But the Tory leader, who also refused to make his case for reform to an EU plenary session, pulled out of the meeting on the eve of his visit to Brussels.

Instead, Downing Street officials hastily rearranged individual meetings with supportive politicians.

He met Elmar Brok of the right-wing European People’s Party, Guy Verhofstadt of the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe and Roberto Gualtieri of the Socialists and Democrats group.

A Downing Street source said all three had “committed to work hard to ensure that the relevant secondary legislation on the emergency brake and child benefit is swiftly adopted by the parliament.”

Mr Cameron hopes the meetings will secure the support of the European Parliament for his reforms.

Key parts, including the “emergency break” on benefits for migrants, will be voted on by MEPs should Britain remain in the EU.

But his snub to five of Parliament’s eight political groups – including the Tories’ own European Conservatives and Reform group – risked increasing resistance.

A spokesperson for the Green-EFA group said: “We are disappointed that David Cameron chose not to speak to the presidents of all the political groups.

In another development this what you can expect from a Conservative government which they are trying their best to conceal by attempting to justify the raising of council rents to market levels for households earning over £30,000, or £40,000 in London, the government constantly repeats the incorrect and insulting refrain that council housing is “subsidising our life-styles”

“The deal that David Cameron hopes to agree with his EU counterparts later this week is not the deal we would want, and he should certainly not assume that the Greens EFA group, or indeed the European Parliament as a whole, will simply rubber-stamp it.”

The Nordic Green Left group, who only learned the meeting had been cancelled through press reports, said the snub had  “undermined” the European Parliament.

President Gabi Zimmer added: “Mr Cameron’s requests to the European Union include deep changes to EU fundamental principles such as equal treatment, non-discrimination and free movement in which the European Parliament should be fully involved as it touches upon the Parliament’s prerogatives in its role as legislator.

“The EU would be well advised not to follow Mr Cameron’s most regressive requests in the field of social security and freedom of movement.”

Politicians from a cross party and even the ruling Conservatives acknowledge that there is a housing crisis in Britain.

They can hardly avoid it. Evidence that there is something rotten in the state of housing is all around us, and not just among the poorest. Children learn in schools about the squalor of the 19th century, the poverty-stricken slums where several families would be crammed into single rooms.

This misery made housing one of the great social issues of the last century from David Lloyd George’s promise of “homes fit for heroes” to the massive expansion of council house building pioneered by Labour from 1945. The post-war generation grew up in a Britain where, on finishing your education, you could expect to get a job and live in a stable home you could call your own, even if you were not the legal owner.

Just as the still ongoing devastation of British industry and manufacturing launched by Margaret Thatcher has made well-paid, secure employment a pipe dream for most young people, so has the (again, still ongoing) sabotage of our social housing sector she began with “right to buy” snatched from a generation the dream of an affordable home to raise a family in.

Increasingly, children are raised in cramped flats their parents share with other young adults.

Research from Shelter and YouGov published today demonstrate that over a quarter of families renting in the private sector have had to move home at least three times in the last five years hardly the secure environment most of us would wish to provide for our offspring in their early years.

People are forced to move because they are powerless trapped without adequate rights in buildings owned by other people. So much for Thatcher’s “property-owning democracy.”

That powerlessness fed the rage of the social tenants protesting at the Marriott Hotel in London’s Grosvenor Square yesterday, because without their being consulted or even informed the trust that had owned their homes sold them on to property firm Butterfields E17, which promptly decided to sell up with no regard for the families whose lives it is wrecking.

It is no surprise, then, that the Scottish Greens have found 54 per cent support north of the border for councils to regulate private-sector rents.

Ed Miliband promised that a Labour government would cap rent rises by private landlords ahead of the last election. Tory ministers who were falling about laughing and shrieking “Marxist!” at this outlandish idea had to sit up and pretend they too had a housing plan when YouGov revealed 60 per cent support for Labour’s proposal across Britain  including 42 per cent support among Conservative voters.

Well, we now know what that “plan” entails the end to lifetime tenancies, the extension of the right to-buy disaster to housing associations, the injection of more hot air into a property and debt bubble which is speeding our country towards another crash.

The Tories are experts at divide and rule, and have sought to present the housing crisis as a battle between generations the ageing homeowners, who are statistically very likely to vote, and the youthful renters who are not and can therefore be screwed till they bleed.

But for Labour, housing can be a unifier. People are not the atomised individuals the Tories think they are.

The housing crisis affects the young people forced to stay with their parents but obviously, it also affects the parents forced to house their adult children indefinitely, and it affects the grandparents who feel they will have to leave their homes to their children but cannot do so because the soaring cost of care is swallowing them up.

Labour must offer its full-throated support to the Kill the Housing and Planning Bill march on March 13 and make sure its local parties are the champions of a new housing deal in every corner of this country.

This is crude demonetization. In fact, a council home normally pays for the initial investment in its building cost after 20 to 30 years and from then on the rents provide a continuous revenue stream for many decades to come.

So don’t be surprise when I and others say vote Labour in all the Local Government to ensure that Labour have a strong voice in Local Government which includes Police Crimes and Commissioners, London Mayoral Elections on 5 May 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Satire: Who are kidding conservatives


Hey folks have a listen to this, this will want you to join the Junior Doctors Strike:

 

Recently the establishment decided to curb charity organisations from using funds they received in the form of grants whilst I have always highlighted this in the public domain and I agree with the sentiment somehow I can’t help but feel this government has a hidden agenda. Ah do I hear people saying. Yes you are reading correct the establishment has got it partly right they do need to close the loopholes from some charities abusing their funding. How do you distinguish which is private funds from private organisations that is the question.

The Tories are using the Trade Union Bill to try and break our relationship. Hidden in the Trade Union Bill is a clause that is deliberately designed to restrict trade unions supporting the Labour Party financially – while doing nothing to limit the hedge funds and millionaires that support the Tories.

The union activists who set up the Labour Party all those years ago did so to ensure working people had a voice in Parliament. The Tories are trying to silence that voice. The Bill is not just an attack on the relationship between the unions and the Labour Party, but it’s an attack on our democracy.

Just like those activists in 1901, we have to pull together as working people to protect our voice in politics. That’s why we’re asking if you could take two minutes to sign and share the petition against the Bill –

http://action.unionstogether.org.uk/democracy

Well it’s not surprising from this government that they want to curb trade union funds which has been on the cards for a long time coming. Even during the Thatcher years there were talks of this happening ever since the miners’ strike which was but on the back burner then it came back to life again from 2010-16 under the Conservative coalition and a Conservative Government does this have a familiar echo within the trade union movement.

Now the establishment wants to subsidised rents for households earning more than £30,000, or £40,000 in London, will be scrapped in April 2017.

Social housing tenants will be asked to pay rent at or near market rates.

Ministers say it “better reflects people’s ability to pay” – but Labour and the Local Government Association say it would hit hard-working families.

The department for communities and local government argues that is “not fair that hard-working people are subsidising the lifestyles of those on higher than average incomes, to the tune of £3,500 per year”.

Housing Minister Brandon Lewis said people who could afford to pay more in rent “should do so” – but it would be graded, so that those on lower incomes would not have to pay full market rates.

“We have always said we would consider carefully how much more people pay as they move through the pay scales, once they get over £30,000,” he told BBC Radio 5 live’s Pienaar’s Politics.

He said the government would “listen to what comes in before we make a final decision in the period ahead of us”.

According to the LGA-commissioned study, almost 60,000 households in England will not be able to afford to pay rents at the market rate or take advantage of the right to buy.

Councillor Peter Box, housing spokesman at the LGA, which represents hundreds of local councils in England, said: “Many social housing tenants across the country will be unable to afford market rents or take up the offer to buy their council home under this policy.

“A couple with three children, earning £15,000 each a year, cannot be defined as high income. Pay to stay needs to be voluntary for councils – as it will be for housing associations.

“This flexibility is essential to allow us to protect social housing tenants and avoid the unintended consequence of hard-working families being penalised, people being disincentivised to work and earn more and key workers, such as nurses, teachers or social workers, having to move out of their local area.”

The LGA figures, compiled by the estate agent Savills, show that almost 215,000 social housing tenants will be affected by the “pay to stay” policy.

The policy is expected to save £245m a year by 2019-20, ending a situation where higher-income social tenants benefit from taxpayer-funded subsidies of up to £3,500 per year.

Former head of the civil service, Lord Kerslake, now a crossbench peer, will attempt to amend the housing bill, which is being scrutinised next week in the House of Lords, to place the scheme at the discretion of local authorities.

The peer, who is now chairman of the Peabody Trust housing association, has warned that the proposals were part of a package that could “threaten the future of social housing”.

“When this was originally discussed in the coalition government, it was intended to deal with the very small number of high earners on over £60,000.

“The current proposals will affect a lot more households with earnings of half that.”

Well it likes the Tories out to get David Cameron between the legs and it seems that Tory MP David Davis said news of the proposed in-work benefits ban could encourage workers to head to the UK.

Sir Eric Pickles, a Eurosceptic who supports Mr Cameron’s reform proposals, said action had to be taken to prevent a “new influx” of migrants.

The ban has to be agreed by all EU nations at a summit on 18 February.

It will be graduated, so that the longer migrant workers stay in the UK, the more in-work benefits, such as tax credits, they will be entitled to, in order to top-up their wages. Mr Cameron says the move will “make a difference” to high levels of immigration by reducing a “pull factor”.

But it will have to be agreed by member states, as part of a wider package of reforms to Britain’s relationship with the EU, and will only apply for a temporary period as an “emergency brake”.

If Mr Cameron can get a deal on his reform package in two weeks’ time at the Brussels summit he is expected to call a referendum on Britain’s membership of the EU in June.

David Davis, a former Tory leadership contender and leading Eurosceptic, said eastern European newspapers had carried numerous stories about the plan to terminate in-work benefits for the first four years after a migrant’s arrival in the UK.

At the same time, he said, Brussels has suggested the scheme could take 12 months to implement.

“Under such circumstances the incentive for anybody wishing to come to live in the UK will be to come as quickly as possible to beat the deadline when any such restrictions come into effect,” he said.

“Accordingly we are likely to see a surge in migrants in the next 12 months.”

Mr Cameron has suggested the “emergency brake” could come into effect within three months of the UK applying for it.

Eric Pickles defended Mr Cameron’s reform deal, on the BBC’s Sunday Politics, saying: “What we need to be clear is, we’re not trying to prevent people moving inside the European Union.”

The reforms were instead aimed at preventing people gaining “something for nothing” by claiming UK benefits before contributing anything in tax.

But  Sir Eric. a Conservative former cabinet minister, said action was needed to prevent a surge of migrants: “Clearly as part of the negotiations we have to ensure that that doesn’t happen.” Meanwhile, speculation is continuing about whether a big cabinet name will lead the campaign to take Britain out of the EU. Other potential Tory “outers” include Justice Secretary Michael Gove and Employment Minister Priti Patel, who have said they will make their position clear when they have seen the final deal.

The hot potato of the day was on Sunday 7 February 2016 on the BBC Andrew Marr Show I did not know whether to laugh, cry or bang my head on the wall like many of the junior doctors when Jeremy Hunt quote that the British Medical Association(BMA) of being “totally irresponsible” over a lengthy industrial dispute. The doctors union had refused to sit down and talk about improving patient care and had spread “misinformation”.

Okay now that I’ve got this out of the way, I say what a load of poppycock or what a load of pile of manure coming out of his mouth. No doubt he is promoting a great message by using spin doctoring to put patents lives at risk and he think we were all born yesterday thinking we all will believe him when he says that hospitals should be open 24/7. Er we all know that hospitals are open seven days a week all year round. Don’t be taken in by this spin doctoring by Jeremy Hunt.

Well Jeremy Hunt to put it in a nutshell it’s okay to put health workers lives in danger by this he pointed the finger at the BMA for the breakdown in negotiations, sticking to the mantra of blaming patient deaths on NHS “inefficiencies,” rather than on the cuts and the need for more doctors and NHS staff — but at the same time he announced some shiny new baubles.

Hunt has continually misrepresented independent studies to claim that the 11,000 extra deaths per year over weekends compared to weekdays is as a result of a “five-day” service and the existence of “excessive overtime rates.”

On the Andrew Marr show he managed to twice misquote the contents of the report while trying to claim he hadn’t been misrepresenting it.

“If the government want more seven-day services then, quite simply, they need more doctors, nurses and diagnostic staff, and the extra investment needed to deliver it,” the BMA retorted correctly.

“Rather than addressing these issues, Jeremy Hunt is instead ploughing ahead with proposals that are unfair and could see many junior doctors voting with their feet.”

The cornerstone of his new strategy appears to be the announcement of a fresh round of investment into upgrading and “modernising” the NHS’s IT infrastructure.

Workers are well inoculated to “modernisation” programmes being used as cover for a fresh round of public money being forked over to the usual rogues’ gallery of privateers — an alarming number of which have former government ministers on their boards.

But the potential for abuse and massive waste of expenditure without any substantial improvements is rife, particularly if it’s left to the usual PFI which was introduce by the Conservatives in 1992 under John Major  or PF2 as the government has now rebranded them contractors to deliver.

When the Labour Government came to power in 1997 it continued with the Tory’s PFI project NHS programme for IT provides a stark example. It took nearly seven years to complete at a cost of an estimated £10 billion most of which was pocketed by IT companies and PFI specialists before finally being abandoned.

But the Tories themselves already have form in this particular area. Under the coalition government, they attempted to introduce their own version of the NHS programme for IT in 2013.

The then health secretary claimed that the goal was to “go paperless across the NHS by 2018.”
The first element of this, the care.data project which aimed at creating a national database of health records that could be shared across the NHS in England, was quietly dropped in the run-up to the last general election after two years of failing to address critical concerns of campaigners and health professionals.

It was their steadfast refusal to drop the selling of this information on to the private sector that killed off this potentially life-saving project.

Lest we forget, the then health secretary in 2013 is the same as the current one — Jeremy Hunt.

But perhaps poor old Jeremy is suffering from a dose of selective amnesia due to the strain he’s been put under over the last few months and forgotten this.

Selected patient information is already made available to certain private medical research companies through the Health and Social Care Information Centre by many NHS trusts, raising questions about data security.

Aggregating of information and data mining have become a booming international market worth billions. And these are far from shadowy companies operating on the fringes of legality. One of the most notorious British-based data miners, Dunnhumby, is owned by Tesco.

The Tories’ unswerving commitment to the neoliberal mantra of “private good, public bad” will ensure that this latest programme is doomed before it begins.

Now that I have got all this my chest i urge all to join the Junior Doctors strike on 10 Feb 2016.

 

 

 

Satire: David Scameron failures


Here is for all to see on youtube and it’s time to make up your own mind over EU referendum:

 

 

Hate to say this but David Cameron makes Faulty Towers looks like a saint and you know what the actor who plays Manuel is a dead giveaway at least you know where he is coming from. As for David Cameron he is the sort of person who has no idea of European Union compare to let’s just say Gordon Brown. Gordon Brown stood his grounds and set out the criteria for a Five Economic Test.

There is a saying a promise is a comfort to a fool. Well Hameron has hoodwinked you again by claiming that he has achieved what was in the conservative manifesto but in truth he got bugger all from his trip to the European Union.  It’s no wonder he is living in the never, never land which Jeremy Corbyn put it so eloquently.

To top it off the Eurosceptic in the Conservatives are all lining up to put the knife into David Cameron which they hope will bring down their dear leader in a untenable position where a leadership challenge will take place. David Cameron faced a barrage of attacks in Parliament over his EU deal.

Nothing odd about that except a big chunk of it came from behind his back.  At least 23 Tory MPs who undermined their Prime Minister’s prize renegotiation in just two hours as part of a full-blooded assault.

Many even wore the garish yellow and black ties of the “Go” campaign to get Britain out of the EU.

What a lark, Hameron and Tusk (European Council President) continues with further talks on EU Reform. I’m sure certain that it will amount to anything if it needs other leaders to back the UK proposal at the summer later this month. This has only come about because Cameron wants to save face.

Why am I not surprised that Scameron fellow EU leaders are not happy with his reform proposals as they stand. Be warned beware of Greeks bearing gifts.

He may get egg in his face after two weeks of difficult negotiations to get all member states to support the deal, I kid you not.

I’m sure that UKIP will take comfort to rub Cameron nose by saying we told you, you not got a dickey-bird and it been a load of cobs wallop of a journey coming out of your gob it’s been nothing more than a waste of your time by going to EU to get a sweetheart deal.

Here are the list of the 23 Conservative rebel MPs:

Sir William Cash

Liam Fox

John Redwood

Peter Lilley

Philip Davies

Sir Edward Leigh

Michael Fabricant

Sir Gerald Howarth

Bernard Jenkin

Steve Baker

Anne Main

Christopher Chope

Jacob Rees-Mogg

John Baron

Peter Bone

Tom Pursglove

David Nuttall

Sarah Wollaston

Richard Drax

Chris Philp

Andrew Brigden

Craig Mackinlay

Martin Vickers

It further transpired that Theresa May has admitted fearing she had created a monster by setting up Police and Crime Commissioners in England and Wales.

The number of incidents had given PCC a bad name.
She also revealed she was planning to expand the powers of PCC after their elections in May. This includes those setting free schools for troubled children.

Well hell yes I have like many others have said the position created by the former Conservatives and Libdems was not value for money.

How many rivers does NHS have to cross before finding out that the Department of Health is to introduce further cuts jobs to reduce running cost.

Non-senior staff numbers will fall from 1,800 to 1,200 – 1,300 by April 2017 and three London offices will move to a single site in Westminister.

Most Whitehall budgets were cut in last November’s spending review and the DoH is trying to make efficiency savings of 30% in the next five years.

The chancellor announced a cut in the budget of DoH although NHS spending was protected. Well not only is this very fishy George Osborne has not said which non-senior staff he is referring to like care staff or cleaners.

It’s been alleged Senior Conservatives are opposed to provisions contained in the government’s Trade Union Bill which could slash funding to Labour Party.

If there is one good thing that has come out of this is a conference to raise funds from world leaders to make a pledge to help Syrians affected by the five year conflict. As much as I concur that funds are needed in Syria hor humanitarian grounds somehow deep down my heart I feel that some of those so called leaders who pledge to give money will not deliver as some of those leaders believes just by saying that they will make a pledge that will sufficient enough. Yet there is another side of me there is a feeling deep down in me says this play into the likes of the far-right groups which includes UKIP.

They will rightly or wrongly say that we should be looking after our own before giving aid to other countries. Well I’ve got news for the far-right groups and UKIP the amount that UK gives in foreign aid is small and every penny UK gives is worthwhile cause and helps improves the quality of life for others.

Well I have to take a look my crystal ball in front of me now. Oh here it comes it is estimated that 14,000 disabled people who rely on a specialist motoring allowance have their cars taken away from them following government welfare changes and the establishment says the new process is fairer and people can appeal. What a load of manure pile coming from the Conservative government.

The reality is they would be more happy to see that their fatcats are filling their party coffers when they say jump and they are happy to accommodate by saying how high master.

Government contractors Capita and Atos apologised over bungled disability tests.

Grovelling bosses from the heavily-criticised outsourcing giants were hauled before MPs to explain missed targets for carrying out vital assessments. The apologies were forced out as bosses were grilled by the Commons Public Accounts Committee.

Confronting the firms with missed targets and complaints over quality, Tory MP Nigel Mills said: “I thought you might be a little apologetic.

Capita divisional managing director Chris Stroud said: “Let me apologise and acknowledge that our quality has not been acceptable, and there’s no shying away from that.”

Atos David Haley admitted: “Any failure of a quality target is unacceptable and we wouldn’t be happy with that.

“We always stay very focused on making sure that we hit and exceed the service level targets.”

A recent report by Whitehall’s spending watchdog found that Maxius was worse than its predecessor.

One in 10 assessments was not up to scratch more than twice as bad as Atos according to the National Audit Office. The company is being paid £595 million over three years to carry out work capability assessments for people applying for employment and support allowance.

Now this gets very intriguingly for the Conservatives it’s been widely alleged that Iain Duncan Smith has paid consultants £200,000 to draw up secret plans for the possible privatisation of a key welfare service.

The Work and Pensions Secretary hired the advisers to look at putting the Access to Work scheme up for tender.

The Access to Work programme employs more than 600 people and is responsible for helping the disabled and long-term sick find a job.

It is alleged that memo has confirmed any privatisation could be seen to weaken the service and advises ministers not to make a public announcement about the plans.

“This is a sensitive piece of work in which stakeholders may have concerns that this represents a dilution of Government support for disability employment.”

“We recommend that DWP (Department for Work and Pensions) do not make a separate public announcement about the feasibility study at this stage,” the memo says.

It goes on to say that the work by the consultants should not be “widely promoted”.

The document says consultants should look at keeping Access to Work within the department, hiving it off to a charity or not-for-profit organisation or putting it up for tender.

But it adds: “We are open to looking at delivery options both inside and outside of Government, particularly where the latter have the additional capability of raising additional external funds.

“Our primary business objective is to increase customer reach whilst remaining a demand-led scheme, at no additional cost above Government forecast expenditure.”

The unions accused Mr Duncan Smith of trying to “fatten up” the service in preparation for privatisation.

How many times have we all read or heard this excuse A DWP spokeswoman said: “Thousands of people have already benefited from the support of the Access to Work scheme, and we want even more to do so.

“As part of this we are exploring whether there is an opportunity to work with organisations such as charities, but no decisions have yet been made.”

Noticed of lately how under hand the whole electoral register process has changed and people are missing from the register and the imposed boundary changes to give them the edge to win the next general elections in 2020.

This sums up the some of Scameron failures in a nutshell and he and others in the Conservatives still believes in their great leader legacies in the name of Thatcherism