Category Archives: #keeptheunionlink

Only time will tell if the prime minister survives


Theresa May reminds me of the original song of Don’t Cry For Me Argentina

Wow don’t know, whether to cry or knock my head around a brick wall over Theresa May apology to her cabinet ministers for her incompetence and mismanagement of the election manifesto. This remind me of a song Don’t Cry For Me Argentina.
This is very rich coming from Gavin Barwell “Anger over Brexit and austerity caused the Tories to lose seats and Labour had tapped into concerns about the impact of years of years of public sector pay freezes and that his party must do more to listen to Remain voters concern”. Could this be his retaliation reply for losing his Croydon Central seat.
Got to hand it to May for wittingly delaying the Queen Speech on the grounds of she is afraid of going to the Queen to let Labour to form a government as her on ministers are very desperate to save face by wanting this sweetheart deal with Democratic Unionists Party(DUP).
It’s no wonder why Arlene Foster is alleged to say “deal between DUP and Tories could be a tremendous opportunity for Northern Ireland”. In other words kiss my arise first and give us more money to play with our voters and we will open up the heavens and bring forth rain to save you mam. This will come as no surprise that Scotland and Wales would want to benefit in a similar way for any cash boost as well.
Already we are seeing the cracks unfolded for ex-prime minister Sir John Major to say “he is dubious about the idea and its impact on peace process”.
John Major and Maggie Thatcher who were the former prime ministers were responsible for introducing and action PFI to sell of mental health homes, and hospitals, and ridding the cleaning services in NHS by introducing the private sector into the NHS to do the cleaning of hospital wards.
George Osborne also said “The government not to change its economic strategy after being left without a commons majority. A so-called end to austerity would lead to a loss of economic credibility”.
Cor blimey, I would never in a million years would I have thought that I would concur with the former Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne calling “Theresa May   dead woman walking” who now is the editor of the Evening Standard.
David Cameron also said “Theresa May will have to listen to other parties as she reviews her Brexit strategy in the wake of the election. There would be pressure for a softer exit from the EU after his party did not win an election majority.
It’s very noticeable the former heavy weights of frontbenchers in Conservatives are coming out in force shooting warning shots to Theresa May to get her act together. David Cameron who gave the nation the referendum vote and he lost the vote decided to resign from politics and sucking up to EU by informing them he will win the referendum.It is said that a week in politics is a long time. I would like some answers from any Conservative members is what do you think of your dear leader, who is weak and wobbly leader, are you just waiting for the backstabbing Johnson to take the helm which he can always deny as much as he wants. He will still be keeping his eyes on ways how to stab his leader with the handle of the knife from behind the scenes.
What I don’t understand is during the campaign trail your dear leader did not want to have a face to face debate with her equal which made her look like a sausage am I missing something as some of your Conservative Supporters have said quietly that she should resign post general elections?
To put the icing on the cake because of a hung parliament they decided to go into a sweetheart deal with the Democratic Unionist Party(DUP) which already a representative is in Northern Ireland wittingly that the DUP has a anti gay and abortion policies and the Scottish Conservative leader is in panic mode with all the assurances in the world you can’t change a leopard spots it’s like eating very soggy rice.
The tide has turned again we have another hung parliament, Conservatives were eight seats short of an overall majority and they turned to DUP have concurred in principle a confidence and supply deal to support a Tory government. This maybe a conspiracy theory in return it looks like two of Theresa May advisors had to be banished into the wilderness or face a leadership challenge by her ministers.
Forgive me if I have my doubts I don’t have any confidence of a Conservative Government on the grounds of witnessing 18 years of underfunding in our public services and decimation of the manufacturing industries during my teenage years as it was more about loads of money to the private sectors and most of all greed.
Question needs to be answered as to why thousands of votes were not included in the results in Plymouth Sutton and Devonport, have I missed a trick or two or has the constituency have muggings written on their foreheads call me syndical for mentioning it in the public domain.
The Tories are on the ropes nationally and it looks like those who had previously refused to serve on Labour’s shadow cabinet under , are ready to serve now.
I don’t think Conservatives will last for very long it’s just not good enough to say “I got you in this mess and I will get you out of it”. Voters wants to see substances, job security, more investment in public services and local government.
Surely something must be done to address the rating cost of foreign package holidays and imported computer games help to push the UK inflation rate up to 2.9% last month from 2.7% in April. The latest inflation rate is the highest since June 2013, and above the Bank of England’s 2% target. The price of food and clothing also went up slightly but fuel is alleged to have fallen for a third month in a row. The pick up in inflation is likely to continue the squeeze on consumers. Theresa May need to address this urgently as foodbanks, soup kitchens, and homelessness continue to increasing rapidly people want action to be taken and not just giving the talk and not doing the walk.

The Guardian has been doing some analysis of the election result and has found some quite startling things:
Labour’s percent of share went up best in areas where the average income has risen the most since David Cameron’s Tories came to office in 2010. By contrast, the seats with the largest falls in income saw the highest increases in the Tory vote. The poorest seats in England saw the biggest Tory advances from 2015.
Turnout went up by the most in seats with a higher percent of young voters and students: this explains why Labour took Canterbury (For instance).
The education divide is also growing. Labour used to do much better with voters on lower education levels. However in 2010 and 2015, this pattern was reversed, and has continued to do so in 2017.
Give credit where it’s due, the Guardian puts it eloquently,” Britain’s class politics has been turned completely upside down in 2017. Wealthy professionals in leafy suburbs have swung behind a Labour leader who pledges to sharply increase their taxes, while it was struggling blue-collar workers in deprived and declining seats who were most attracted by the party of austerity cuts to public services and welfare.”
I would urge the Prime Minister should rethink its Brexit strategy, Social Care, more investments in public and civil services most importantly the disabled, mental health, learning disabilities, young and grey powers following last week’s election. For the PM to survive she should be more open and transparent to our nation if not she will not survive. On saying this I would rather have a Labour Government in power instead of a Conservative who are willing to do sweetheart deals with Democratic Unionist Party(DUP) only time will tell if the prime minister survives.

My thoughts on Local and Metro Mayoral Election results


It’s no surprise that Conservatives won four out of six new Metro Mayoral Elections which includes West Midlands, Tees Valley, Cambridge, and Peterborough. In kind, I take the view it’s better to have won two seats than none (Manchester and Liverpool). Some of our traditional Labour voters in some of our heartlands turned to UKIP as they were speaking their language then afterwards winning the Brexit argument they abandon them, they turned their attention towards the Conservatives which is very worrying times if Labour does not address this issue quickly.
There is no denying that the Conservatives have gained in council seats and mayoral elections by winning 11 new councils, and also holding on to their existing seats to form a majority, of course all the commenters will say that Labour will lose with high opinion polls indicating of high gains in the General Elections for the Conservatives. Intriguingly this reminds me of the old fart(Donald Trump) quoting fake news when he wants to promote positives and can’t get his way then he takes to twitter when he was receiving a battering in the opinion polls and the press. Well this is expected as the press and media are paid to sell their newspapers and to increase their readerships This brings me to the question how effective is any political parties with large membership if they don’t come out and help to get the votes for the political parties they are representing on the doorsteps to get any political party into power with a very clear message why they deserve your vote or have political parties gone very complacent to the extent they think that low turn outs is the business. Well I can put my hand on my heart and say this not acceptable and this trend needs to change now, not tomorrow. This election should have been about local issues such as street cleaning, investment in community centres, schools, parks, roadworks, nurseries, and street lighting but instead it’s been marred by national issues such as Brexit and personalities.

Here is a reminder to all feel free to watch this youtube:

It is alleged that local government elections count towards the results which party will hold the keys to number 10 Downing St, this is false on the grounds of its local parties decides what local issues that affect their wards which helps to build towards the local government policies to enhance to the quality of life in their wards. Most voters will vote on issues that impact on their lifestyles and what political party best represent them and when political parties get out of favour with the voters, voters are like marmite like it or not they get voted out to pave the way for a new government in waiting.
No doubt that there will be winners and losers in any elections which the democratic process has been resolved at the ballot boxes. The other side of the coin is some parties may continue to play the blame game and their lack of failures to look at the root causes of why they lost the elections and it’s just not good enough just giving a good talk and not taking action as voters will see through it they will vote for other parties with a heavy heart instead or they will refuse to vote. In all political parties there will be always be infighting between the so called left and right which really does not help as the public views it as a political party can’t get its act together. When this happens voters can only take so much before they vote for other political parties into office.
Not long ago the Conservatives were fighting amongst themselves and they were very unpopular at the time but they still managed to last for eighteen years in power. The voters in turn paved the way for New Labour to take office in 1997. They spoke in a language that the centre ground understood very well and they continued to vote Labour. About right now some people will be chocking on their breakfast, coffee, lunch, or dinner by mentioning this part of history that the Conservatives will want to bury and forget. (Nasty Party image)
Any political parties can have increase in membership, but does it really translate to influencing the voters to vote in a particular way. To the Jones and Smiths it means nothing to them unless it affects their bread and butter issues. Local turns out are different and normally lower than General Election turn outs.
I question what does taking back control of the UK means to you, as it mean different things to many things to all of us. Does it mean immigration or watering down workers’ rights, selling off our NHS, decreasing our Welfare System, more cuts to our public services or more of Brexit which are all vote winners depending which party will deliver.
The snap general elections was designed to cause maximum confusion for a Conservative win not just to the the traditional conservative heartlands but they had the intention of chipping away into Labour, Libdem, and UKIP heartlands, to win Local and Mayoral Elections Maggie Thatcher did very well during her time in office.
It is been alleged that more than 930,000 new voters have registered to vote in this forthcoming Snap General Elections of those, is said to be under 25s. The highest number of the registration online 147,000 and 3,364 paper forms being submitted was done during Theresa May speech and another surge on the day of local government elections on 4 May. Now is the time to go on Labour doorsteps to convince voters that Labour is the party for the many and not the few.
To put it very bluntly I don’t give a flying monkeys if you voted for Corbyn or not in the Labour leadership contest. What matters is we all have a duty to our party to get a Labour victory out to help form the next Labour Government on 8 June. Don’t let the Conservatives use the Ed Miliband’s tomb stone manifesto plan in 2015 to hoodwink the voters to gain a landslide victory for the Conservatives.

This is not intended to preach to the converted how to suck eggs, but to encourage the converted to take the message to the unconverted why it’s important not to lose their rights to vote in this snap General Elections called by the conservatives by stressing the importance of returning a Labour Government into office on 8 June as every vote counts for Labour leaving no stones unturned for this to happen both camps will have to work together for a Labour victory and don’t sit on the sidelines and play into the press and media just so they can sell their negative garbage to the electorates. Labour does have positive messages to promote and recognise they have a historical scale to win back power this can only happen when it’s members are united. It’s just not good enough taking selfies and thinking it’s good enough to win over voters or feeling safe over their comfort zone just being councillors or career politician. In a nutshell I urge all to put away your difference start to fight for the Labour Party. Remember “United We Stand, Divided We Fall”.
By my estimation we have four an half weeks to turn around some of the misfortunes that has accrued by learning from the lessons of Local and Mayoral Elections to convince voters that the Conservatives are for the rich and not for the working class and take the fight to the marginal seats to turn it into Labour seats. Let’s face it Ice Queen Theresa May is the reincarnation of Maggie Thatcher promoting Thatcherism in this election and make no mistake she will promote it for the 8 June Snap General Elections to gain a landslide victory. I’m sure as hell I don’t want to wake up on the morning of 9 June to see another Conservative in government do you, if not then now is the time to get active and do your duty for Labour by joining in our telephone banks, Branch Labour Parties, Constituency Labour Parties by actively helping out on Labour campaign trails for a Labour victory on 8 June

Satire:Time for Ice Queen Theresa May to change her tune


Here is something we all must be aware of which will make you cringe sitting in the comfort of your settee:

 

Notice how the establishment has immigration high on their agenda just like UKIP as the chancellor has suggested that foreign students and highly skilled workers. Funny enough this does not surprise me at all. Then the government release a statement stating the opposite by denying it and comes out with they are committed to bring net migration down below 100,000 I can only say that they don’t know what the left hand from their right hand is doing as it is a very sensitive issue to address. Somehow this smacks of Donald Trump by saying that he will build a wall the way to Mexico speech.

Michael Gove has been elected to a key body which will scrutinise the work of ministers in charge of Brexit.

The pro-Leave MP is one of ten Tories elected to the 21-strong Exiting the European Union Select Committee, which will have a wide remit to hold David Davis’ department to account.

This comes just months after Gove was sacked as Justice Secretary in the wake of Brexit.

Eight of the conservatives on the new committee backed Leave. Labour has put forward a team of five pro-Remain MPs, including the committee’s Chair, Hilary Benn, who will have a casting vote.

Along with Gove, the Tory team includes Alistair Burt, Maria Caulfield, Andrea Jenkyns, Jeremy Lefroy, Peter Lilley, Karl McKartney, Craig Mackinley, Dominic Raab and John Whittingdale.

Tory MPs Anna Soubry and Peter Bone were unsuccessful in their bids to sit on the committee.

Labour’s committee members include Stephen Timms, Emma Reynolds, Pat McFadden, and Seema Malhotra.

The committee will be almost double the size of nearly every other Commons select committee, a decision some MPs claim is a deliberate sabotage of its work, as it will be harder to reach consensus.

The SNP is to elect two members to the committee, while the Lib Dems, the Democratic Unionist Party, the SDLP, and Plaid Cymru will each chose one.

A major Lincolnshire employer has announced it is moving its headquarters to Europe as a direct result of the Brexit vote in June.nmbikghkp

Anxiety over the cost of a hard Brexit, which would see the UK drifting away from cooperation with the rest of the EU, has compelled Smiffys to open a new headquarters in the Netherlands.

Elliott Peckett, director of Smiffys, said 40 per cent of the company sales go to the European Union, its largest trading partner, and he needs to be prudent. “The Government proclaim that they want to encourage Britain to export, but pursuing this hard Brexit approach has simply pulled the chair from beneath us and left us dangling. The simple answer is that we cannot afford to wait.

“During that time [the negotiating process], not only will Smiffys have lost valuable EU sales due to this uncertainty, as we are already experiencing, but we will have lost the opportunity to have acted to protect what are vital sales to our company. “Moreover, the fact that the pound is now at a 168-year record low against the dollar, according to the Bank of England, sums up the outlook for the UK economy under the approach that the Government are taking on Brexit.” The company, a costume and fancy dress supplier which employs 250 people across its two sites in Gainsborough and Leeds, has been based in the UK for more than 120 years.

Mr Peckett said: “Smiffys have no choice but to protect our business by moving our headquarters to the EU. This will allow us to continue growing our trade to the EU, from within the single market.”

Prior to joining the Single Market Smiffys exported only a tiny fraction of their current sales to the EU.

“Both Smiffys and its European customers were then faced with bureaucratic and administrative barriers, not to mention the costly import duties that our products attracted, making us uncompetitive,” Mr Peckett explained.

“Going back to these times would feel like a step back in time and a lost opportunity to freely access a trading bloc of over 500 million people,” he added.

Another concern for the company is the uncertainty surrounding its workforce as it employs over a dozen European staff.

“All we have heard from the Government is that it is highly unlikely that they will be allowed to stay and work for us. If this is the case, this will remove Smiffys’ ability to communicate as well as we currently do with our EU customers,” Mr Peckett said.

Smiffys’ announcement comes as banks and financial firms warned they could start making decisions to move assets out of the UK as early as 2017if there is no deal in place to maintain their rights to sell services freely across the EU.

Open Europe, which took a neutral stance on the referendum, warned that losing access to the single market could cost banks in the UK as much as £27bn, or a fifth of their annual revenue.

On Thursday, Nicolas Mackel, the head of financial development for Luxembourg, said a string of overseas banks and fund managers had explored moving London staff to the tiny country since the Brexit vote.

A senior Tory ally of David Cameron has suggested that Cabinet ministers and the public who back ‘Hard Brexit’ are “stupid”.

Lord Hill, a former EU Commissioner and Leader of the Lords under the ex-PM, warned that the UK had to decide if it wanted to leave the EU with most of its trade links intact, or preferred to make migration curbs a priority.

“I think we have this kind of false choice in the UK often between ‘hard Brexit’ and ‘soft Brexit’,” Hill told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme.

“I think the choice is between stupid Brexit and more intelligent Brexit and that is what we need to go for.

“My whole approach to this would be that if we approach it in a sensible way, because the European system is a deal-based system, there is more scope for trying to resolve it intelligently than if we go at it in a way where we all end up shouting at each other.”

‘Hard Brexit’ is used in Westminster to describe a clean break with the EU’s single market tariff-free system on goods, while imposing strict visa controls on immigrants. Some MPs suspect that Brexit Secretary David Davis, Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson and International Trade Secretary Liam Fox are prepared to put the UK on World Trade Organisation tariffs rather than remain members of the EU market.

Lord Hill, who resigned as the EU’s Commissioner for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union soon after the referendum vote, even claimed that many EU leaders felt Britain was too smart to really quit the EU.

The row came as Theresa May faced the humiliation of seeing Brexit discussed right at the end of a working dinner in Brussels at her first EU summit.

Lord Hill’s remarks followed an outspoken David Davis ( Brexit Secretary) by former Greek finance minister Yanis Varoufakis.

The former member of the left-wing government in Athens told the BBC’s Question Time that Davis was running a “Pythonesque department of exit, staffed by several people of very low IQ”. Lord Hill, a long-time ally of Cameron, announced his resignation from his Brussels post just two days after the Brexit vote on June 23.

His comments today sparked a swift backlash from one senior Tory MP, “Suggesting millions of British voters are ‘stupid’ didn’t work for the Remainers in the EU referendum, did it?

“Lord Hill threw his toys out of his pram in June, preferred to flounce off to make money. Hardly surprising as his EU steer to Cameron was so duff. Would you want strategic advice from him?”

On Question Time, Varoufakis refused to name any Brexit department staffers who might be of low IQ, saying these were already well known. UK establishment Brexit Minister (David Davis) to visit his counterpart Micheal Russell in Scotland what transpired his visit since the vote to leave the EU at the roundtable discussion with business figures. All I can say god help us all. As this is not enough embarrassment now transpired that that there is so much u-turn from the UK establishment’s Brexit secretary any arrangements to leave the EU would be a UK deal.

A former Treasury civil servant (Sir Brian Unwin) has eloquently put it by stating that the Brexit Minister (David Davis) is in cloud cuckoo land if he believes Brexit talks are heavily weighted in favour of UK, the Brexit Minister and other should rein back hard and unconstructive talk. The UK has said it will begin formal talks about existing the European Union (EU) by the end of March 2017.

It is alleged that thousands of High Street pharmacies in England could face closure after ministers confirm plains to after the funding system and make cuts. The Department of Health confirmed that they want to reduce the budget by £2.8 billion a year by more than £2 million over the next two years. It has been suggested cuts on this scale could lead up to 3,000 of the 11,700 pharmacies being closed.

We know that Ice Queen Theresa May is in Brussels to talk about Brexit and she is keeping the cards very close to her chest by giving little information to the 28 leaders. To be frank this leads me to strongly believe that she does not know how to move forward on this. The media and public are more focused on the infighting of Labour Party instead of looking at Conservatives who are also doing their infighting with the likes of the three brexiters who occupy the front benches of government. It is further evident that the establishment wants Britain to be part of EU decision-making until Brexit with our negotiating is completed with the summit affecting all 28 members’ states are being discussed.

Its alleged by a former senior police officer (Peter Sheridan) who is now chief executive at Cooperation Ireland warned that Brexit could lead to civil unrest in Northern Ireland and went further to mentioned about the a fragile peace process with the numerous agreements that made up Northern Ireland’s peace process show the brittle nature of its politics and less than a year ago, both governments had to step in to rescue the executives.

I wholeheartedly support the Welsh First Minister by saying for full and unfettered access to the single market. Leaders of the UK’s devolved governments must not undermine Brexit negotiations. Ice Queen Theresa May has offered the Welsh Government a formal seat in the talks to shape the UK’s EU exit strategy. The joint ministerial council which includes Carwyn Jones and the prime minister, met for the first time since 2014.

It’s no surprise that Ice Queen Theresa May has predicted that there will difficulties ahead with the summit leaders to Brexit. She felt it was like a deadlock over landmark EU-Canada trade deal.

Just when we thought we saw the end of George Osborne was parked to the backbenches and out of sight, he is like the prince of darkness read to take a bite by quoting he made mistakes in EU referendum campaign and failed to understand the anger felt by many leave voters. He went to say many voters felt completely disconnected and don’t feel part of the national economy that worked for them.

Establishment borrowing rose by more than expected to £10.6 billon in September according to figure from the Office National Statistics (ONS). The figure was £1.3 Billon higher than the same month last year. For the financial year to date between April and September, borrowing by £2.3 billon to £45.5 billon.

I support the call from the Local Government Association to hold talks with town hall bosses to give councils more building powers to build houses where they are needed and to be freed from restrictions on ability to borrow to fund new home building which includes powers to replace council homes that are sold off as quickly as possible. I’m not convinced that the establishment will grant it instead they rather give the talk but can’t do the walk, the walk. They rather stick to the line of the government is delivering on its commitment to replace all properties sold on a one for one basis.

Anthony Browne British Bankers Association (BBA) quotes leading UK banks are preparing to relocate amid fears over the impact of Brexit negotiations sometime next year over fears around Brexit and smaller banks could move operations overseas by 2017. Their hands are quivering over the relocation button. He further commented most banks had backed the UK remaining in the EU. The current public and political debate at the moment is taking us in the wrong direction.

It’s about time that Jeremy Corbyn challenged Ice Queen Theresa May over shambolic Tory Brexit by saying the establishment has no plan for UK departure and highlighted for clarity and warned of the effect of Brexit on the border.

Jeremy Corbyn took a swipe at the Prime Minister for her inaction over Brexit by saying that her so-called plan is akin to those Blackadder’s loyal dogsbody Baldrick would have devised.

The Labour leader mocked Theresa May’s “chaotic” lack of strategy by insisting that the hapless BBC sitcom character is the only “great philosopher” whose thinking he could detect in current Tory policy.

Mr Corbyn when he said: “On Monday, you told the House: ‘We have a plan which is not to set out at every stage of the negotiations the details.’

“I’ve been thinking about this for a couple of days. I think when searching for the real meaning and the importance behind the Prime Minister’s statement, you have to consult the great philosophers.

“The only one I could come up with is Baldrick, who says: ‘Our cunning plan is to have no plan.’

“Brexit was apparently about taking back control but the devolved governments don’t know the plan, businesses don’t know the plan, Parliament doesn’t know the plan.

“When will the Prime Minister abandon this shambolic Tory Brexit and develop a plan that delivers for the whole country?”

Ms May suggested it was “interesting” that Baldrick actor Sir Tony Robinson was a Labour member, implying that he had left the party.

Mr Robinson tweeted to confirm that he is still a member after 40 years despite being a vocal critic of Mr Corbyn.

The actor ridiculed the state of government by tweeting: “If [Brexit Secretary] David Davis needs any help with Brexit, Baldrick stands ready to serve.”

Ms May outlined a vague plan for Brexit for which the process is expected to start next March in invoking Article 50.

She said: “We’re going to deliver on the vote of the British people, we’re going to deliver the best possible deal for trade in goods and services with and operation within the European Union, and we’re going to deliver an end to free movement.

“That’s what the British people want and that’s what this government is going to deliver for them.”

So in a nutshell she has nothing to offer and it’s time she changed her tune and come up a Brexit plan.

 

 

Labour unite to fight the conservatives let this be our mission to prove the conservative wrong.


How far are the Conservatives willing to go to work on the meaning of Brexit. It seems to me that they don’t have a clue what is best for our nation over Brexit. Now that I’ve done the pleasantries and people are sitting comfortably on the edge of their seats waiting for the sting to hit them in their face and their pockets. Here comes the announcement which I predicted the day that Ice Queen Theresa May had her coronation day she will be playing a cat and mouse games with our lives by triggering formal Brexit process by early next year followed by a snap General Election in 2017. This will come as no surprise to some people the moment Ice Queen Theresa May announced the trigger article 50, the clause needed to start the process in the early months of 2017 the sterling fell to a three year low against the euro and U.S. dollar.

Here is something that make you cringe when you this this person face:


Britain must size the “golden opportunity” provided by Brexit and not “fritter it away’. Notice the tone of language the Conservatives use to soften the blow to the British pubic in order to hoodwink us all into believing that the British voters will be daft into believing the conservative is the best thing since slice cake. UKIP are jumping for joy at the moment by winning the Brexit vote and they can’t seem to move from the past even though they have chosen a new leader in UKIP only for her to resign after 18 days being elected. So far we have seen changes in leadership of various political parties the only difference is many political parties in Parliament and councils calling on their foes to defect or cross the floor to their party.

Intriguing that Philip Hammond claims that he will prioritise spending on new homes and transportation and stabbing his chum in the back (George Osborne). It’s good to know that he acknowledges that the Brexit vote caused turbulence and business confidence would be on a bit of a rollercoaster. So in a nutshell he is hinting of borrowing more money to simulate the economy.

It’s no wonder why when we all look at the wider issue on rental homes the establishment will want to make a quick announcement to get it out of the way at their conference.

See article below UK mass shortage of rental homes:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-37547912

My two close friends put their case so eloquently who said:

Chris Lowe:

International students bring 7 billion GBP into the UK every year. 55 current world leaders were educated in British universities.

In the EU Referendum, Leave campaigners celebrated the Australian visa system.

Australia has a government policy to target international students and bring more and more of them to Australia. The British government has the opposite policy.

In pursuit of Brexit, the Conservatives will turn the UK into a backwater of Europe, ignored except as a quaint tourist destination. In 50 years’ time, world leaders may not even remember that the UK exists, while outward looking countries benefit from the money of international students and the soft power that hosting future leaders brings.

J David Morgan:

The response to Amber Rudd

The plans were condemned as “madness” by Paul Blomfield, co-chair of the all-party parliamentary group on international students. The Labour MP said: “I’m shocked by the home secretary’s comments, which are spectacularly ill informed. She doesn’t seem to know how many universities we have in the UK or understand the current rules for which she is responsible, let alone appreciate the contribution international students make.
“International students bring £8bn a year to the UK economy, creating tens of thousands of jobs. Education is one of our most successful export industries. The only people cheering today’s announcement will be our competitors.”

Ice Queen Theresa May will use her Conference speech to claim the centre ground is the way forward. If I’m honest I don’t always support let along vote Tories, Ice Queen Theresa May does have a point for any party to win elections they need to move to the centre ground to win votes to form the next government in waiting. Hate to say it but listening to Ice Queen Theresa May on the one hand it sounded like part socialism and capitalism trying to convince our Labour supporters to cross over to the conservatives which includes UKIP and Libdems voters.nfjgkbn

Here is the full extract of Ice queen Theresa May full text Conference Speech In Birmingham 2016:

When we came to Birmingham this week, some big questions were hanging in the air.

Do we have a plan for Brexit? We do.

Are we ready for the effort it will take to see it through? We are.

Can Boris Johnson stay on message for a full four days? Just about.

But I know there’s another big question people want me to answer.

What’s my vision for Britain? My philosophy? My approach?

Today I want to answer that question very directly.

I want to set out my vision for Britain after Brexit.

I want to lay out my approach – the things I believe.

I want to explain what a country that works for everyone means.

I want to set our party and our country on the path towards the new centre ground of British politics…

built on the values of fairness and opportunity…

where everyone plays by the same rules and where every single person – regardless of their background, or that of their parents – is given the chance to be all they want to be.

And as I do so, I want to be clear about something else: that a vision is nothing without the determination to see it through.

No vision ever built a business by itself. No vision ever clothed a family or fed a hungry child. No vision ever changed a country on its own.

You need to put the hours in and the effort too.

But if you do, great things can happen. Great changes can occur.

And be in no doubt, that’s what Britain needs today.

Because in June people voted for change. And a change is going to come.

Change has got to come because as we leave the European Union and take control of our own destiny, the task of tackling some of Britain’s long-standing challenges – like how to train enough people to do the jobs of the future – becomes ever more urgent.

But change has got to come too because of the quiet revolution that took place in our country just three months ago – a revolution in which millions of our fellow citizens stood up and said they were not prepared to be ignored anymore.

Because this is a turning point for our country.

A once-in-a-generation chance to change the direction of our nation for good.

To step back and ask ourselves what kind of country we want to be.

Let’s be clear: we have come a long way over the past six years.

We’ve brought the deficit down.

Got more people into work than ever before.

Taken the lowest paid out of income tax.

Established a new National Living Wage.

Helped nearly a million new business to set up and grow.

Got almost one and a half million more children into good or outstanding schools.

Put record investment into the NHS.

Created nearly 3 million new apprenticeships.

And brought crime down by more than a quarter to its lowest ever level.

That’s a record of which we should all be proud.

And this morning it’s right that we pause to say thank you to the man who made that possible. A man who challenged us to change and told us that if we did then we would win again.

And he was right. We did change. We did win. The first majority Conservative Government in almost 25 years.

A great leader of our party – a great servant to our country.

David Cameron, thank you.

But now we need to change again. For the referendum was not just a vote to withdraw from the EU. It was about something broader – something that the European Union had come to represent.

It was about a sense – deep, profound and let’s face it often justified – that many people have today that the world works well for a privileged few, but not for them.

It was a vote not just to change Britain’s relationship with the European Union, but to call for a change in the way our country works – and the people for whom it works – forever.

Knock on almost any door in almost any part of the country, and you will find the roots of the revolution laid bare.

Our society should work for everyone, but if you can’t afford to get onto the property ladder, or your child is stuck in a bad school, it doesn’t feel like it’s working for you.

Our economy should work for everyone, but if your pay has stagnated for several years in a row and fixed items of spending keep going up, it doesn’t feel like it’s working for you.

Our democracy should work for everyone, but if you’ve been trying to say things need to change for years and your complaints fall on deaf ears, it doesn’t feel like it’s working for you.

And the roots of the revolution run deep. Because it wasn’t the wealthy who made the biggest sacrifices after the financial crash, but ordinary, working class families.

And if you’re one of those people who lost their job, who stayed in work but on reduced hours, took a pay cut as household bills rocketed, or – and I know a lot of people don’t like to admit this – someone who finds themselves out of work or on lower wages because of low-skilled immigration, life simply doesn’t seem fair.

It feels like your dreams have been sacrificed in the service of others.

So change has got to come.

Because if we don’t respond – if we don’t take this opportunity to deliver the change people want – resentments will grow. Divisions will become entrenched.

And that would be a disaster for Britain.

Because the lesson of Britain is that we are a country built on the bonds of family, community, citizenship.

Of strong institutions and a strong society.

The country of my parents who instilled in me a sense of public service and of public servants everywhere who want to give something back.

The parent who works hard all week but takes time out to coach the kids football team at the weekend.

The local family business in my constituency that’s been serving the community for more than 50 years.

The servicemen and women I met last week who wear their uniform proudly at home and serve our nation with honour abroad.

A country of decency, fairness and quiet resolve.

And a successful country – small in size but large in stature – that with less than 1% of the world’s population boasts more Nobel Laureates than any country outside the United States… with three more added again just yesterday – two of whom worked here in this great city.

A country that boasts three of the top ten universities in the world. The world’s leading financial capital. And institutions like the NHS and BBC whose reputations echo in some of the farthest corners of the globe.

All possible because we are one United Kingdom – England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland – and I will always fight to preserve our proud, historic Union and will never let divisive nationalists drive us apart.

Yet within our society today, we see division and unfairness all around. Between a more prosperous older generation and a struggling younger generation. Between the wealth of London and the rest of the country.

But perhaps most of all, between the rich, the successful and the powerful – and their fellow citizens.

Now don’t get me wrong. We applaud success. We want people to get on.

But we also value something else: the spirit of citizenship.

That spirit that means you respect the bonds and obligations that make our society work. That means a commitment to the men and women who live around you, who work for you, who buy the goods and services you sell.

That spirit that means recognising the social contract that says you train up local young people before you take on cheap labour from overseas.

That spirit that means you do as others do, and pay your fair share of tax.

But today, too many people in positions of power behave as though they have more in common with international elites than with the people down the road, the people they employ, the people they pass in the street.

But if you believe you’re a citizen of the world, you’re a citizen of nowhere. You don’t understand what the very word ‘citizenship’ means.

So if you’re a boss who earns a fortune but doesn’t look after your staff…

An international company that treats tax laws as an optional extra…

A household name that refuses to work with the authorities even to fight terrorism…

A director who takes out massive dividends while knowing that the company pension is about to go bust…

I’m putting you on warning. This can’t go on anymore.

A change has got to come. And this party – the Conservative Party – is going to make that change.

So today, I want to set out my plan for a Britain where everyone plays by the same rules and every person has the opportunity to be all they want to be.

It’s a plan to tackle the unfairness and injustice that divides us, so that we may build a new united Britain, rooted in the centre ground.

A plan that will mean government stepping up. Righting wrongs. Challenging vested interests. Taking big decisions. Doing what we believe to be right. Getting the job done.

Because that’s the good that government can do. And it’s what I’m in this for. To stand up for the weak and stand up to the strong.

And to put the power of government squarely at the service of ordinary working-class people.

Because too often that isn’t how it works today.

Just listen to the way a lot of politicians and commentators talk about the public.

They find your patriotism distasteful, your concerns about immigration parochial, your views about crime illiberal, your attachment to your job security inconvenient.

They find the fact that more than seventeen million voters decided to leave the European Union simply bewildering.

Because if you’re well off and comfortable, Britain is a different country and these concerns are not your concerns. It’s easy to dismiss them – easy to say that all you want from government is for it to get out of the way.

But a change has got to come. It’s time to remember the good that government can do.

Time for a new approach that says while government does not have all the answers, government can and should be a force for good;

that the state exists to provide what individual people, communities and markets cannot;

and that we should employ the power of government for the good of the people.

Time to reject the ideological templates provided by the socialist left and the libertarian right and to embrace a new centre ground in which government steps up – and not back – to act on behalf of us all.

Providing security from crime, but from ill health and unemployment too.

Supporting free markets, but stepping in to repair them when they aren’t working as they should.

Encouraging business and supporting free trade, but not accepting one set of rules for some and another for everyone else.

And if we do – if we act to correct unfairness and injustice and put government at the service of ordinary working people – we can build that new united Britain in which everyone plays by the same rules, and in which the powerful and the privileged no longer ignore the interests of the people.

Only we can do it. Because the main lesson I take from their conference last week is that the Labour Party is not just divided, but divisive.

Determined to pit one against another. To pursue vendettas and settle scores. And to embrace the politics of pointless protest that simply pulls people further apart.

That’s what Labour stands for today. Fighting among themselves. Abusing their own MPs. Threatening to end their careers. Tolerating anti-Semitism and supporting voices of hate.

You know what some people call them?

The nasty party.

And with Labour divided, divisive and out-of-touch, we have a responsibility to step up, represent and govern for the whole nation.

So where Labour build barriers, we will build bridges.

That means tackling unfairness and injustice, and shifting the balance of Britain decisively in favour of ordinary working class people.

Giving them access to the opportunities that are too often the preserve of the privileged few.

Putting fairness at the heart of our agenda and creating a country in which hard work is rewarded and talent is welcome.

A nation where contribution matters more than entitlement. Merit matters more than wealth.

A confident global Britain that doesn’t turn its back on globalisation but ensures the benefits are shared by all.

A country that is prosperous and secure, so every person may share in the wealth of the nation and live their life free from fear.

That’s what I mean by a country that works for everyone.

And if we believe in the good that government can do, it’s important for people to trust us to deliver the change they need.

We can start – as I said on Sunday – by doing something obvious. And that is to stop quibbling, respect what the people told us on the 23rd of June – and take Britain out of the European Union.

Because it took that typically British quiet resolve for people to go out and vote as they did: to defy the establishment, to ignore the threats, to make their voice heard.

So let us have that same resolve now.

And let’s be clear about what is going to happen.

Article Fifty – triggered no later than the end of March.

A Great Repeal Bill to get rid of the European Communities Act – introduced in the next Parliamentary session.

Our laws made not in Brussels but in Westminster.

Our judges sitting not in Luxembourg but in courts across the land.

The authority of EU law in this country ended forever.

The people told us they wanted these things – and this Conservative Government is going to deliver them.

It is, of course, too early to say exactly what agreement we will reach with the EU. It’s going to be a tough negotiation, it will require some give and take. And while there will always be pressure to give a running commentary, it will not be in our national interest to do so. But let me be clear about the agreement we seek.

I want it to reflect the strong and mature relationships we enjoy with our European friends.

I want it to include cooperation on law enforcement and counter-terrorism work.

I want it to involve free trade, in goods and services.

I want it to give British companies the maximum freedom to trade with and operate within the Single Market – and let European businesses do the same here.

But let’s state one thing loud and clear: we are not leaving the European Union only to give up control of immigration all over again. And we are not leaving only to return to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice. That’s not going to happen.

We are leaving to become, once more, a fully sovereign and independent country – and the deal is going to have to work for Britain.

And that Britain – the Britain we build after Brexit – is going to be a Global Britain.

Because while we are leaving the European Union, we will not leave the continent of Europe. We will not abandon our friends and allies abroad. And we will not retreat from the world.

In fact, now is the time to forge a bold, new, confident role for ourselves on the world stage.

Keeping our promises to the poorest people in the world.

Providing humanitarian support for refugees in need.

Taking the lead on cracking down on modern slavery wherever it is found.

Ratifying the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

Always acting as the strongest and most passionate advocate for free trade right across the globe.

And always committed to a strong national defence and supporting the finest Armed Forces known to man.

And this week, our excellent Defence Secretary, Michael Fallon, proved not only that we will support them with our hearts and souls. Not only will we remain committed to spending two per cent of our national income on defence.

But we will never again – in any future conflict – let those activist, left-wing human rights lawyers harangue and harass the bravest of the brave – the men and women of Britain’s Armed Forces.

It’s about restoring fairness – something that must be at the heart of everything we do. Supporting those who do the right thing, who make a contribution.

Helping those who give something back.

And that’s at the heart of my plan for our economy too.

An economy that’s fair and where everyone plays by the same rules.

That means acting to tackle some of the economy’s structural problems that hold people back.

Things like the shortage of affordable homes. The need to make big decisions on – and invest in – our infrastructure. The need to rebalance the economy across sectors and areas in order to spread wealth and prosperity around the country.

Politicians have talked about this for years. But the trouble is that this kind of change will never just happen by itself. If that’s what we want, we need the vision and determination to see it through.

That’s why Philip Hammond and Greg Clark are working on a new industrial strategy to address those long-term structural challenges and get Britain firing on all cylinders again.

It’s not about picking winners, propping up failing industries, or bringing old companies back from the dead.

It’s about identifying the industries that are of strategic value to our economy and supporting and promoting them through policies on trade, tax, infrastructure, skills, training, and research and development.

It’s about doing what every other major and growing economy in the world does.

Not just sitting back and seeing what happens – but putting in place a plan and getting on with the job.

So we will identify the sectors of the economy – financial services, yes, but life sciences, tech, aerospace, car manufacturing, the creative industries and many others – that are of strategic importance to our economy, and do everything we can to encourage, develop and support them.

And we will identify the places that have the potential to contribute to economic growth and become the homes to millions of new jobs.

That means inspiring an economic and cultural revival of all of our great regional cities.

We have made a start.

Thanks to George Osborne’s Northern Powerhouse, over the past year, foreign direct investment in the North has increased at double the rate of the rest of the country.

Here in Birmingham, thanks to the incredible Jaguar Land Rover, the West Midlands is the only part of the country to run a trade surplus with China.

And across the region, the Midlands Engine is on track to deliver 300,000 more jobs by 2020.

Now it’s time to build on that success – in Birmingham and Manchester and in other cities across the country.

And as we are here in Birmingham this week, let us show our support for the Conservative Party’s candidate for next year’s mayoral election.

A success in business running John Lewis. An action man in Birmingham, playing his part in transforming this city. A man to get things done, the future Mayor of the West Midlands – Andy Street.

An economy that works for everyone is an economy where everyone plays by the same rules.

I understand the frustration people feel when they see the rich and the powerful getting away with things that they themselves wouldn’t dream of doing. And they wouldn’t get away with if they tried.

I understand that because I feel it too.

There’s always an excuse – a reason why something can’t be done – but when that is used as a basis for inaction, faith in capitalism and free markets falls.

The Conservative Party will always believe in free markets. And that’s precisely why it’s this party that should act to defend them.

From Edmund Burke onwards, Conservatives have always understood that if you want to preserve something important, you need to be prepared to reform it. We must apply that same approach today.

That’s why where markets are dysfunctional, we should be prepared to intervene.

Where companies are exploiting the failures of the market in which they operate, where consumer choice is inhibited by deliberately complex pricing structures, we must set the market right.

It’s just not right, for example, that half of people living in rural areas, and so many small businesses, can’t get a decent broadband connection.

It’s just not right that two thirds of energy customers are stuck on the most expensive tariffs.

And it’s just not right that the housing market continues to fail working people either.

Ask almost any question about social fairness or problems with our economy, and the answer so often comes back to housing.

High housing costs – and the growing gap between those on the property ladder and those who are not – lie at the heart of falling social mobility, falling savings and low productivity.

We will do everything we can to help people financially so they can buy their own home. That’s why Help to Buy and Right to Buy are the right things to do.

But as Sajid said in his bold speech on Monday, there is an honest truth we need to address. We simply need to build more homes.

This means using the power of government to step in and repair the dysfunctional housing market.

It means using public sector land for more and faster house building.

It means encouraging new technologies that will help us to get more houses built faster. And putting in more government investment too.

It means stepping up and doing what’s right for Britain.

Making the market work for working people.

Because that’s what government can do.

And something else we need to do: take big, sometimes even controversial, decisions about our country’s infrastructure.

Because we need to get Britain firing in all areas again.

It is why we will press ahead with plans for High Speed 2, linking London and Birmingham and, eventually, towns and cities in the North.

Why we will shortly announce a decision on expanding Britain’s airport capacity.

And why – having reviewed the evidence and added important new national security safeguards – we signed up to Hinkley Point.

We will take the big decisions when they’re the right decisions for Britain.

Because that’s what government can do.

And we can make these big decisions because our economy is strong and because of the fiscal discipline we have shown over the last six years.

And we must continue to aim for a balanced budget.

But to build an economy that works for everyone, we must also invest in the things that matter, the things with a long-term return.

That is how we will address the weaknesses in our economy, improve our productivity, increase economic growth and ensure everyone gets a fair share.

And that’s not the only reason.

Because while monetary policy – with super-low interest rates and quantitative easing – provided the necessary emergency medicine after the financial crash, we have to acknowledge there have been some bad side effects.

People with assets have got richer. People without them have suffered. People with mortgages have found their debts cheaper. People with savings have found themselves poorer.

A change has got to come. And we are going to deliver it.

Because that’s what a Conservative Government can do.

This party will always be the party of businesses large and small.

But we must acknowledge that the way a small number of businesses behave fuels the frustration people feel.

It’s not the norm. I know that most businesses and the people who run them are hardworking, entrepreneurial and public spirited at heart.

But the actions of a few tar the reputations of the many.

So the party that believes in business is going to change things to help support it.

Too often the people who are supposed to hold big business accountable are drawn from the same, narrow social and professional circles as the executive team.

And too often the scrutiny they provide is not good enough.

A change has got to come.

So later this year we will publish our plans to have not just consumers represented on company boards, but workers as well.

Because we are the party of workers. Of those who put in the effort. Those who contribute and give of their best.

That’s why we announced on Saturday that we’re going to review our laws to make sure that, in our modern and flexible economy, people are properly protected at work.

That’s right.

Workers’ rights – not under threat from a Conservative government.

Workers’ rights – protected and enhanced by a Conservative government.

And let me say something about tax.

We’re all Conservatives here. We all believe in a low-tax economy. But we also know that tax is the price we pay for living in a civilised society.

Nobody, no individual tycoon and no single business, however rich, has succeeded on their own.

Their goods are transported by road, their workers are educated in schools, their customers are part of sophisticated networks taking in the private sector, the public sector and charities.

We’ve all played a part in that success.

So it doesn’t matter to me who you are.

If you’re a tax-dodger, we’re coming after you.

If you’re an accountant, a financial adviser or a middleman who helps people to avoid what they owe to society, we’re coming after you too.

An economy that works for everyone is one where everyone plays by the same rules.

So whoever you are you – however rich or powerful – you have a duty to pay your tax.

And we’re going to make sure you do.

This is a big agenda for change. But it is necessary and essential.

It is a programme for government to act to create an economy that works for everyone – an economy that’s on the side of ordinary working class people.

And an economy that can support the vital public services and institutions upon which we all rely – to invest in the things we hold dear.

Like the NHS – one of the finest health care systems anywhere in the world, and a vital national institution.

An institution that reflects our values, our belief in fairness, and in which we all take enormous pride.

And I mean all.

Because there is complete cross-party support for the NHS.

For its status as a provider of free-at-the-point-of-use health care. For the thousands of doctors and nurses that work around the clock to care for their patients.

We all have a story about the nurse who cared for a loved one, or a surgeon who saved the life of a friend.

So let us take this opportunity to say to those doctors and nurses – thank you.

The NHS should unite us. But year after year, election after election, Labour try to use it to divide us.

At every election since it was established, Labour have said the Tories would cut the NHS – and every time we have spent more on it.

Every election, they say we want to privatise the NHS – and every time we have protected it.

In fact, the party that expanded the use of the private sector in the NHS the fastest was not this party, but the Labour Party.

The only party to ever cut spending on the NHS is not this party, but the Labour Party – that’s what they did in Wales.

And at the last election, it wasn’t the Labour Party that pledged to give the NHS the money it asked for to meet its five-year plan – it was this party, the Conservative Party…

investing an extra £10 billion in the NHS – more than its leaders asked for…

and this year more patients are being treated, and more operations are being carried out, by more doctors and more nurses than ever before.

That’s a tribute to everyone who works in the NHS.

But also to one man – Jeremy Hunt – who is one of the most passionate advocates for patients and for the doctors, nurses and others who work in our health service that I have ever known.

So let’s have no more of Labour’s absurd belief that they have a monopoly on compassion.

Let’s put an end to their sanctimonious pretence of moral superiority.

Let’s make clear that they have given up the right to call themselves the party of the NHS, the party of the workers, the party of public servants.

They gave up that right when they adopted the politics of division. When their extreme ideological fixations led them to simply stop listening to the country.

When they abandoned the centre ground.

And let us take this opportunity to show that we, the Conservative Party, truly are the party of the workers…

the party of public servants…

the party of the NHS.

Because we believe in public service. We believe in investing in and supporting the institutions that make our country great.

We believe in the good that government can do.

Government cannot stand aside when it sees social injustice and unfairness. If we want to make sure Britain is a country that works for everyone, government has to act to make sure opportunity is fairly shared.

And I want us to be a country where it doesn’t matter where you were born, who your parents are, where you went to school, what your accent sounds like, what god you worship, whether you’re a man or a woman, gay or straight, or black or white.

All that should matter is the talent you have and how hard you’re prepared to work.

But if we’re honest we’ll admit that’s simply not the case for everyone today.

Advancement in today’s Britain is still too often determined by wealth or circumstance.

By an accident of birth rather than talent.

By privilege not merit.

Rebalancing our economy is a start, but if we’re serious about overturning some of the longstanding injustices and barriers that stop working people from getting on, we need that economic reform to be allied with genuine and deep social reform too.

Because a society that works for everyone is a society based on fairness. And only genuine social reform can deliver it.

Genuine social reform means helping more people onto the housing ladder. It means making sure every child has access to a good school place.

It means never writing off people who can work and consigning them to a life on benefits, but giving them the chance to go out and earn a living and to enjoy the dignity that comes with a job well done.

But for those who can’t work, we must offer our full support – which is why it was so important that Damian Green announced on Saturday that we will end the mandatory retesting of those with chronic health conditions that only induces stress but does nothing at all to help.

And genuine social reform means addressing historic injustices that hold too many people back.

Some of my proudest moments as Home Secretary came when we began to tackle deep-seated and long-standing problems that few had dared to tackle before.

I introduced the first ever Modern Slavery Act, bringing in tough new penalties to put slave masters behind bars, with life sentences for the worst offenders.

I cut the police’s use of stop and search by almost two thirds and reduced the disproportionate targeting of young, black men.

And I know our impressive new Home Secretary Amber Rudd is committed to carrying on that work.

But injustices remain.

If you are from a black Caribbean background, you are three times more likely to be permanently excluded from school than other children.

If you are a black woman, you are seven times more likely to be detained under mental health legislation than a white woman.

People in ethnic minority households are almost twice as likely to live in relative poverty as white people.

But it is not just those from minority backgrounds who are affected.

White working class boys are less likely to go to university than any other group in society.

We cannot let this stand – not if a country that works for everyone is the principle that binds us all together.

That’s why I have launched an unprecedented audit of public services to shine a light on these racial disparities and let us do something about them.

Because they are all burning injustices, and I want this government – this Conservative Government – to fight every single one of them.

A society that works for everyone is one of fairness and opportunity. A society in which everyone has the chance to go as far as their talents will take them.

That’s why in one of the first speeches I gave as Prime Minister I set out my plans to transform Britain into a Great Meritocracy.

And that starts in our schools.

I want Britain to be a country in which every child has access to a good school place that’s right for that individual child.

Because Britain after Brexit will need to make use of all of the talent we have in this country.

We have come a long way.

Thanks to the free schools and academies programme and the efforts of teachers, heads and governors, there are now 1.4 million more children in good and outstanding schools compared with 2010.

But we need to go further. Because there are still one and a quarter million children in schools that are just not good enough.

And if you live in the Midlands or the North, you have less chance of attending a good school than children in the South.

This simply cannot go on.

That’s why Justine Greening and I have set out a new package of reforms, building on Michael Gove’s success, to increase the number of good school places across the country… so there’s not just a school place for every child, but a good school place for every child. A school place that suits the skills, interests and abilities of every single pupil.

That is why we want more of our great universities to set up or sponsor schools in the state sector – just as the University of Birmingham has done, a few miles from here.

It’s why we are saying to the great private schools that – in return for their charitable tax status – we want them to do more to take on children without the means to pay, or set up and sponsor good state schools.

It is why we want more good faith schools for parents and pupils who want them.

And it is why we have said – where there is demand from parents, where they will definitely take pupils from all backgrounds, where they will play a part in improving the quality of all schools in their area – we will lift the ban on establishing new grammar schools too.

And here we see the challenge.

Because for too long politicians have said to people and communities who are crying out for change that they can’t have what they want.

They’ve said we don’t think you should have it, even though we might enjoy those very same things for ourselves.

And you end up in the absurd situation where you stop these good, popular, life-changing schools from opening – by law.

Imagine. Think of what that says.

If you’re rich or well off, you can have a selective education for your child. You can send them to a selective private school. You can move to a better catchment area or afford to send them long distances to get the education you want.

But if you’re not, you can’t.

I can think of no better illustration of the problem – why ordinary working class people think it’s one rule for them, and another for everyone else.

Because the message we are sending them is this: we will not allow their children to have the same opportunities that wealthier children enjoy.

That is a scandal and we – the Conservative Party – must bring it to an end.

So my vision is for Britain to be a Great Meritocracy.

That’s what I’ve always believed in. The cause that everything I have ever done in politics has been designed to serve.

Because a country based on merit not privilege, is a country that’s fair. And when we overcome unfairness and injustice, we can build that new united Britain that we need.

And united, we can do great things.

We saw that in the summer in Rio. We saw how individual success was powered by collective effort. How the dedication and talent of one was supported by a united team.

And how a government’s determination – John Major’s Conservative Government’s determination – to step up and back Britain’s sporting success contributed to such a remarkable result.

We were honoured to welcome four members of the team – Helen Richardson-Walsh, Dame Sarah Storey, Vicky Thornley and Andrew Triggs-Hodge – to our conference on Monday.

And to them – and to every athlete and every member of Team and Paralympics GB – we say, thank you. You did your country proud.

It was a memorable summer for British sport, but one moment stood out for me above all other.

It was not from Rio. It happened later. Just a couple of weeks ago on the sun-drenched streets of Cozumel in Mexico.

There, our celebrated triathlon champion Jonny Brownlee was heading for glory, the finishing line in sight, when he faltered. Stopped. And was falling exhausted to the ground.

And just behind him, his brother Alistair – a tough competitor who typically yields to no one – had the chance to run on and steal the prize.

But seeing his brother’s struggle, he didn’t pass on by. As other competitors ran past, he stopped. Reached out his hand. And gently carried him home.

And there in that moment, we saw revealed an essential truth. That we succeed or fail together. We achieve together or fall short together.

And when one among us falters, our most basic human instinct is to put our own self-interest aside, to reach out our hand and help them over the line.

That’s why the central tenet of my belief is that there is more to life than individualism and self-interest.

We form families, communities, towns, cities, counties and nations. We have a responsibility to one another.

And I firmly believe that government has a responsibility too.

It is to act to encourage and nurture those relationships, networks and institutions – and to step up to correct injustices and tackle unfairness where it can – because these are the things that can drive us apart.

That’s why I say today – as I have always said – that my mission – and the mission of this party – is to build a country that truly works for everyone, not just the privileged few.

It’s why when I stood on the steps of Number 10 for the first time as Prime Minister 84 days ago, I said that the Government I lead will be driven not by the interests of the rich and powerful, but by the interests of ordinary, working class people.

And this week, we have shown the country that we mean business.

Not just protecting, but enhancing workers’ rights.

Building an economy that’s fair, where everyone plays by the same rules.

Getting more houses built. More doctors in the NHS.

Investing in things that will make our economy grow.

Hundreds of great new schools. Universities and fee-paying schools helping state schools to improve.

And yes, where parents want them and where they’ll improve standards for children of whatever background – the first new grammar schools to open in England for fifty years.

This is a bold plan to bring Britain together. To build a new united Britain, rooted in the centre ground.

An agenda for a new modern Conservatism. That understands the good government can do. That will never hesitate to face down the powerful when they abuse their positions of privilege.

That will always act in the interests of ordinary, working class people.

That’s what government’s about: action. It’s about doing something, not being someone.

About identifying injustices, finding solutions, driving change. Taking, not shirking, the big decisions. Having the courage to see things through.

It’s not always glamorous or exciting, but at its best it’s a noble calling.

And where many just see government as the problem, I want to show it can be part of the solution too.

And I know this to be true.

For as I leave the door of my office at Number 10, I pass that famous staircase – the portraits of prime ministers past lined up along the wall.

Men – and of course one woman – of consequence, who have steered this country through difficult times – and changed it for the better too.

There’s Disraeli, who saw division and worked to heal it. Churchill, who confronted evil and had the strength to overcome. Attlee, with the vision to build a great national institution. And Lady Thatcher who taught us we could dream great dreams again.

Those portraits remind me of the good that government can do.

That nothing good comes easy.

But with courage and vision and determination you can always see things through.

And as I pass them every day, I remember that our nation has been shaped by those who stepped up to be counted when the big moments came.

Such opportunities are rare, but we face such a moment today.

A moment that calls us to respond and to reshape our nation once again.

Not every generation is given this opportunity.

Not every generation called to step up in such a way.

But this is our generation’s moment.

To write a new future upon the page.

To bring power home and make decisions… here in Britain.

To take back control and shape our future… here in Britain.

To build an outward looking, confident, trading nation… here in Britain.

To build a stronger, fairer, brighter future… here in Britain.

That is the opportunity we have been given.

And the responsibility to grasp it falls upon us all.

So to everyone here this morning – and the millions beyond whether leavers or remain – I say:

Come with me and we’ll write that brighter future.

Come with me and we’ll make that change.

Come with me as we rise to meet this moment.

Come with me and together let’s seize the day.

Well I’ve come to the conclusion that politicians practice how to tell porkies with a straight-faced to the electorate, it can be difficult to work out where they stand and who they represent.

An innocent arriving in Britain from another country, or perhaps a distant galaxy, could be forgiven for accepting at face value Theresa May’s claim that the Tories are now “truly the party of the workers, the party of the NHS, the party of public servants.”

Her insistence that Britain will become a “great meritocracy” based on fairness and opportunity has echoes of the early years of Tony Blair.

Similarly, the Tory leader’s warning to the “big six” energy companies that she will intervene “where markets are dysfunctional” smacks of Ed Miliband’s pledge to “reset” the energy market. May didn’t emulate Miliband in threatening to impose a temporary tariff freeze, but her admirers applauded her comments nonetheless.

The Prime Minister must have been listening to speeches by Jeremy Corbyn or John McDonnell as she sympathised with working-class people frustrated over unaffordable housing, stagnating wages and insecure jobs and put employers on notice that not looking after staff or allowing pension funds to go bust “can’t go on any more.”

Into her list of working-class complaints she slipped in “pay undercut by low-skilled immigrants.”

It may have escaped her notice that immigrants of whatever skill level do not lay down pay rates. Employers do, while government sets the legal minimum wage.

And yet, in sad contrast to the glaring absence of proposals to tackle housing, low pay, secure jobs and so on, she made dealing with foreign-born workers a priority.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd floated a proposal on Tuesday that companies could be compelled to reveal the number of staff members born outside Britain to shame them into employing more British-born workers and reducing immigration.

The impact of this bullying on workplace relations aside, what if birthplace disparities aren’t easily discernible? Perhaps employees could have, as a condition of employment, to wear a tasteful addition to their clothing such as a nicely embroidered star, with different colours for various categories of workers. Who could possibly object?

Rudd’s revolting proposal has nothing to do with improving skills or employment prospects for British-born workers.

It is a deliberately divisive ploy to set workers at each other’s throats, make Britain a less hospitable place for people wishing to settle here and gain votes for the Tory Party among racists and xenophobes.

It is 14 years since May noted that many voters saw the Tories as the “nasty party,” in view of its hostility to the poor, claimants, racial minorities and LGBT people.

She is now trying a con-trick of global proportions by pinning that epithet on Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour, claiming that her Tory government will stand up for the weak against the strong.

Anyone tempted to believe that this leopard has changed her spots might ask themselves why the CBI bosses’ organisation and all May’s ministers who previously backed David Cameron and George Osborne’s capitalist austerity policies are right behind her.

They know that May’s rhetoric about workers, the NHS and public services is empty. It’s window dressing for the hard of thinking. The only positive aspect of her verbal lurch to the left is that she understands the attraction to voters of the new approach pushed by Corbyn and McDonnell.

Their commitment to social justice isn’t confined to conference speeches. It’s a daily reality that puts May’s political dishonesty to shame.

Satire: The state of our beloved nation


It’s worrying times to know that Queen Theresa May gets her coronation to be leader of Conservatives and Prime Minister of our nation. Let’s look at the wider picture we still have foodbanks, homelessness, big, medium, and small businesses going into administration just before and post brexit UK. Some parts of society will not recognise that Hatecrimes organised by far-right groups by using selective targeting both EU and Muslim disabilities communities in UK, UK football team knocked out of European Match which includes Wales. Intriguingly it’s been purported that some Labour voters have more confidence in Queen Theresa May as prime minister which is dangerous.
Here is something I remember listening to and it really hit some hometruths:

Now that I’ve got the pleasantries out of the way it’s time to be prepare for a snap General Elections after the vote in parliament on the referendum and article 50 see details: http://www.lisbon-treaty.org/wcm/the-lisbon-treaty/treaty-on-European-union-and-comments/title-6-final-provisions/137-article-50.html and the clown Boris Johnson should be held to account for his part of the Leave Campaign with some misleading quotes regards to our beloved National Health Service(NHS) and some inflammatory remarks on immigrants.

I do recognize that we have a fix term Parliament which was introduced by the nasty party whilst in a coalition with the Libdems however there has been calls from certain quarters for Queen Theresa May to call for a snap General Election as voters did not voted for her as Prime Minister and she has said she will not call for one that is her right to call the shots on this I won’t be one bit surprised that Tories will be mobilising from behind the scenes preparing for it. This sorts to remind me of one Gordon Brown who backed out from calling a snap General Elections. I’m sure this will be timed when they announce it at a time when they think the oppositions will be off guard which I would not put it pass her to do so.

How can I even forget this another song that hits home again:

Even at this moment it’s still not clear what the timetable of all the cabinet positions at the choosing of Queen Theresa May who will be the brexit cabinet minister he or she will have to produce the results of the will of the nation which is a minefield to for the Conservatives given half the party are very much split between remain and leave somewhat like Labour when it came to campaigning in the referendum. One thing is for sure David Cameron vision and legacy has been very much marred with increased foodbanks, homelessness, people with disabilities having money taken off their benefits, lack of investment in public service which have resulted in cuts and closures of some services. The contracts of junior doctors being ripped up and the possibility of imposition of a new contract this is so much for we are all in it together under conservatism one nation for all of us whilst the poor get poorer and the rich gets greedier with their wealth and very happy to stick two fingers at the establishment by putting it into off shore accounts.

What the nation can concur is that the Conservative have seen two women succeed as Prime Minister one dead(Maggie Thatcher) and the other as we know her as Queen Theresa May whilst in Labour a storm arises with the Parliamentary Labour Party between hurricane Jeremy Corbyn this must be a very bitter pill to swallow when 172 MPs resigns from shadow cabinet and a vote of no confidence. There is a two reasons why there is a vote of no confidence this is on the grounds of that Members of Parliament wants to see a change in the way how the leader operates and wanting to see a change of attitude in the leader or the working relationship is so unbearable.

I’m in the opinion that they wanted a change of direction in the leadership to offer more in policies and leadership. However the vote of no confidence must be used as a last result which seems to fall on deaf ears in some quarters of Labour. Let me make very clear that nobody should have their property damaged or be intimidated and any incidence should be reported to the relevant bodies investigate it instead of alleging which groups or fan club is responsible. Members will have a choice who they want to be the leader of Labour Party there may be a third candidate that has thrown their hat in the ring. I’m sure that Labour Party members have seen many leadership changes in the pass to last a life time and deep down did not want this to happen as we all know that passions are very high and at times get out of hand. Let us all have a comradely debate who will be the best leader to lead the party and unite and heal all the fraction(s) which I take no comfort in saying this publicly as one chapter closes and another one begins whoever wins the leadership I will continue to give my support to no matter during the bad, good, and ugly times of the premiership of Labour. The public does not want to see our party carry on  with the infighting as this will lose public confidence the party. When I receive my secret ballot papers one will accordingly and shall not divulge which way I voted in the coming elections of both leadership and Labour NEC.

 

In/Out Referendum


Here is something to wet your appetite please take time to listen then lets debate about it:

I was once a euro sceptic but no more. I use to think the European Union was all about our fishing policies and a bunch of Germans who wants to maintain their world domination and this is why there want the euro so badly but when I was home after traveling from Europe with a trade union delegation to Brussels and totally forgot that my then partner was holding a house warming party a someone knocked on my door at about 8pm and this was the turning point of my life. A short woman who I recognise said “Hello Gordon it’s been a while since we last spoke”.

Obviously I was not going to let her stay outside and speak to me so I invited her and her colleague into my humble abode. The kettle was on and we offered them a strong cup of chai before the rest of our guest turned up whilst I was entertaining my two guest the conversation led to the European Union which I said to both Neena Gill and Michael Cashman MEPs that I have strong reservations about the current trend towards the European Union. They naturally reassured me that it was not all that bad and don’t believe all those scaremongering stories that you have read in the press and some trade union were putting out on their newsletters to members. Well I can tell all the hype at the time was very convincing and I almost fell for it.

jhirgjkl;To be frank I would say if you are not convinced about the European Union, I have to say that I live in the West Midlands Region in a city called Birmingham and I look around to see the benefits of what the European funding has provide which has been very positive:

Whether or not you are for Brexit or firmly in the remain camp there can be no doubt that the European Union has shaped Birmingham’s development with almost £1 billion of investment.

From the International Convention Centre during the early 90s to the recent Youth Employment Initiative, Birmingham and the West Midlands have enjoyed many benefits of European Union funding.

There are 15 items on our list of things the EU has done for Birmingham. Of course that is not the whole story, there have been many smaller projects and, at the same time, the UK Government has paid millions in to the EU.

jkkhklySo one question for the politicians is whether, should Britain vote to leave, the Government will step in and replace the stream of funding from Brussels and support Birmingham’s future growth and development. The EU chipped in £50 million towards the ICC and Symphony Hall which opened for business in 1991. It most famously welcomed global leaders, including Presidents Bill Clinton and Boris Yeltsin to the 1998 G8 Summit. Each year it hosts some 350 events including political and business conferences bringing hundreds of thousands of visitors to the city.

There was further help for the city’s conference and exhibition industry with a £30 million cheque towards the refurbishment of the NEC – which of course is home to Crufts and many other major shows bringing thousands more to the city. Remember the upgrade of railway linking Birmingham to London, the North West and Scotland and reducing journey times in the process? The EU paid £66 million towards that.jdfjdgb

Those folks in Brussels helped Birmingham rid itself of one its biggest mistakes of the 1960s. It paid £9.1 million towards the redevelopment of Masshouse Circus in 2002, including the breaking of the Queensway flyover, known as the concrete collar, which had held back the expansion of the city centre for more than a generation.

Built in 1834 the Town Hall is the city’s premier historic building. But just over decade ago it was in a pretty sorry state, covered in soot and neglected. The EU, with a £3 million handout, was among a number of backers which saw it cleaned-up, its stonework restored and its interior refurbished and reopened in 2007.

The home of the Thinktank Museum and Birmingham City University was completed in 2000, it was, through a £25.6 million investment, the the UK’s largest ERDF funded project at the time.

Over £6 million invested in Innovation Birmingham, the former Aston Science Park, bringing digital and high technology businesses and jobs to the city.

Only last month the city council accepted a £33 million EU social fund grant towards its scheme to get 16,000 Brummies age under 30s into employment.urjg

Between 2007 and 2013, as the economy nose-dived, the European Regional Development Fund provided financial support for 24,910 West Midlands based businesses. At the centre of Birmingham’s historic Jewellery Quarter is the Assay Office, one of the few places that precious metals can be tested and hall marked. Part of the cost of its expansion and relocation last year was covered with a £1.5 million EU grant.

The collapse of MG Rover in 2005 directly caused 6,000 redundancies, plus many further losses along the supply chains. The task force was set up to create jobs, invest and help get those workers back into employment. More than a third of its £176 million pot came from EU emergency funds. In the West Midlands alone between 2007 and 2013 universities benefited to the tune of about £260 million, funding research into health, food, energy, climate change and transport. They are receiving similar amounts under the new funding package.

Grants totalling £741,000 over six years helped get the festival launched in 2008 and established. In 2014 the festival was estimated to be worth £2.6 million to the city’s visitor economy. The EU gave £530,000 towards the setting up of this vital community centre in Winson Green. The ERDF stumped up £2.5 million, of the £6 million cost of developing this facility for the Sikh community and wider population of Handsworth. It opened in 2006.ktkyh

I received lots of emails from Friday until today I have had a number of people email, text, call me on my thoughts around the EU referendum  so i thought it i best if i put my thoughts together for you all to consider.

On the 23rd June 2016 we have an opportunity to decide the future of our United Kingdom with the EU Referendum. It is a once in a lifetime chance, and we cannot afford to get it wrong.

I pondered over the last few 15 years, and like a lot of you I’m unhappy with the undemocratic status of the EU, the lack of credible accounts, wasteful neglect of our resources, and the perception of a wider capitalist agenda on the cards.

However I did my own research, listened to colleagues, and attended debates to reach the conclusion that despite the scepticism the alternative of not being a member of the European Union is far too risky, and something that we as a country can ill-afford. The cost of the membership is alleged to be approx £18.8 billion but we have a special rebate that returns allegedly in the approx of £14.4 billion out of which £9.8 billion is given to the farming industry, and £5.7 billion to universities. This leaves around £89 per head for EU membership which is minuscule in comparison to the fact that Norway for a mere trade agreement contributes approx £134 per head without having a vote or indeed much influence in the EU.

We have around 2.5 million British in the European Union, and a similar number of EU citizens here but overall they contribute more than £2.6 billion that access to welfare benefits which we hardly hear of.

Imagine if we left the EU, and car makers such as Jaguar Land Rover were forced to pay a tariff for every car exported to the EU who are our largest importers of goods. There was be no sound economical reason for Jaguar Land Rover to stay in the West Midlands and it would have a devastating impact on us.

The EU is not perfect but we can work together with other socialists within Europe to bring about a fairer more transparent, democratic Europe. I fear the far right will take hold if we exit.

TTIP is a threat either way but being part of a united Europe puts us in a stronger position to negotiate in our interests. I believe being out would give big corporations free reign and too much power see article below:

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/what-is-ttip-and-six-reasons-why-the-answer-should-scare-you-9779688.html

The EU in a rational and coherent manner. Whatever your final decision maybe, it’s important that you use your right to vote, having weighed up as much information as possible on this complex issue. The outcome of this referendum will affect us all for generations to come. Please vote wisely.

I cannot see how more than 40 years of EU legislation that has had an impact will unravel if we left the EU, and the consequences that would have on everyday life for us. I recently went to five events across the West Midlands and London all speakers agreed it would be very messy divorce indeed. I am voting Remain, alongside my three local councillors and Member Of Parliament along with my fellow Labour Activists on 23 June and urge all to vote Remain.

 

Satire: Let’s look into the crystal ball of osborne budget has decree


This really sums up what the establishment budget is all about checkout this and feel free to share widely:

I love my country but hate what this establishment do on almost anything but to hand our children and grand children’s education over into the hands of corporate big business and be accountable to no body is about as low as it gets. Yet another major change that got absolutely no mention in their manifesto.

A Tory future is a very dark place unless you’re a wealthy Tory everything folk have fought for is being thrown down the drain by the Conservatives.

This reminded me of a short documentary the other day I was invited to watch courtesy of some of my Syrian friends which the children sum it up what they had to struggle to reach to the UK under the so called invitation of this current establishment and how they and their parent struggle to get into a school.

It with sad heart to say if children are the future of tomorrow, what future does the children of Syria has today with the constant bombardment of bombing from both sides something has to give to have any hope of any peaceful solution to allow children to be safe and attend schools and feel safe to learn.

On saying this I’m wholeheartedly support the part withdrawal of Russian troops out of Syria and let there be a good working relationship can hold and democratic elections can take place with a diplomatic solution.

The hard reality is those who are already in the UK some will return to Syria and some will remain in the UK as some have restarted to rebuild their lives and have young families. I can’t see them living to return to a country that does not have the capacity to rebuild their homes from scratch it cost a fortune and whoever is elected as the democratic government has their work cut out for them.

It’s like me saying I long to return to our land(China) when we have a democratic and free elections knowing full well it’s just a pipe dream and acknowledging it’s our people that needs to have a will to do so.

Hence the heart is willing but the flesh is weak I kid you not. Oh let me take a look at my Crystal Ball I see the nasty party budget decreeing:

That they will introduce a Sugar Tax on soft drinks raising £520 million which will allegedly spent on primary school sport.

Now the establishment has over step the line by introducing legislation to turn all schools into academy.

This includes £500 million to ensure fair funding formula for schools in England.

Plans to enable all pupils to study maths until 18.

The Conservatives seem to fall into the trap that one size fits all and in actual fact this is not the case as what the Conservatives want us all to believe. Don’t be hoodwinked into believing this.

Libor funds to be spent on children hospital services specifically in Birmingham Manchester Sheffield and South Hampton

Somehow my personal view is we have not seen the end of Jeremy Hunt backing down on a 7 day NHS services and he still does not get it or refuse to comprehend that there is not enough doctors to run a 7 day NHS in England as the current posts are left vacant and are not being filled and gaps in rotas are being seen and I will continue to say solidarity to all junior doctors in their case against Jeremy Hunt.

It’s no surprise that fourteen leading doctors have formally written to George Osborne asking for further funding for Social Care. They have highlighted cuts in social care funding were putting real pressure on NHS, they also highlighted social care was vital to the success of the NHS. Whilst I concur with the leading doctors speaking out let’s not forget that it’s not just the NHS in this predicament it also applies to Local Government as they too are underfunded with social care. It’s hurting but it’s not working so my message to all is to lobby your local member of parliament to lobby the establishment to put more investment to Local Government Social Care.

The Money Advice Services which has provided financial advice to consumers since 2010 is to be abolished.

You’ve heard of stealth taxes? Now there’s stealth austerity.

The £1.6bn cuts to business rates for small a business which means £1.6bn less funding to local councils. And that means more cuts to services that vulnerable people rely on.

Stealth austerity brought to you by George Osborne in ‪Budget 2016. Few people seem to have picked up a flaw in the Chancellors sugar tax. He has announced this fanfare tax but giving the sugar donors two years to address the problem of over saturated sweet drinks. In the same breath he tells us that he will collect over half a £Billion pounds from this tax. How does he know that he will still be able to collect that tax if he is giving them 2 years to reduce it which means nothing adds up but then again nothing ever does with this Chancellor.

As if this not bad enough we see that Tory front bench left ‘ashen-faced’ in response to Corbyn’s attack on Osborne’s disability cuts  Cameron, May and Osborne were left ‘completely ashen-faced’ as Mr Corbyn raised the issue of cuts to benefits for disabled people that will see some claimants lose £30 per week.

Corbyn said: “Earlier this month the government pushed through a £30-per-week cut to disabled ESA claimants.

“Last week we learned that half a million people will lose up to £150 per week due to cuts in personal independence payments.

Simple question to the chancellor if he can finance the giveaways he has put in his budget to different sectors, why can’t he fund the need for dignity for disabled people in this country?”

More of this please, Jeremy week in, week out; in season, out of season until the truth is rammed home to everyone in the UK who has ears to hear, a mind to understand and a heart to care.

This is the sixth year of George Osborne’s tenure as Chancellor. This is the sixth year he has delivered the budget. And this is the sixth year that he has blamed the ‘last Labour government’.

But, today, we have learned that the Chancellor has failed on debt. In 2010 he vowed to eliminate the budget deficit.

Six years later, he has failed in 2010 George Osborne gave a cast iron promise to tackle debt. Six years later, he has missed his own targets. Forecast debt as a share of GDP has been revised up in 2016-17, in 2017-18, in 2018-19, in 2019-20 and in 2020-21. He has broken his promise, he has missed his targets and he has failed to tackle debt.

On the 16 March 2016 George Osborne did what he does best he blamed the ‘last Labour government’. But six years of failure on the economy are catching up with him and now he needs to take responsibility for his own actions.

“In fact, we heard his warning today of the potential for another ‘global economic crisis.’ It seems that he’s getting his excused in early. In 2008 there was a global economic crisis and he blamed it on the Labour government. I wonder if he will blame any looming global economic crisis on this government.”

So we have had the budget we know how cack-handed this government has become

We know that have not got a Martin Luther King, or a Malcolm X to help us or lead us out of darkness.

We have to look at what is inside ourselves, ask yourselves what I can do to help campaigns, help and support others. The power is in us each one of us can and does make a difference never ever forget that.

Turn the anger into action and rattle them some more today and until the give in to submission there is a way around it by naming and shaming every MP with vested interests in private health care companies, got their fingers in the profit pies, keep naming and shaming MPs who voted for ESA Cuts,

I think that we should show up all MPs up in regards their expenses, their massive house of commons bar bill. Or we can get creative, imaginative and let’s show this underhand government enough is enough is enough.

George Osborne should be judged by what he promised. In 2010, he said he would get rid of the deficit in five years. By 2015, there was a black hole of £18bn in the public finances, while the deficit was going up and had reached £90.2bn.

He promised a “march of the makers”. He promised that manufacturing would lead the recovery in our economy. But manufacturing is in recession and we have a growing trade deficit, meaning we are not exporting enough and are importing too much. The difficulties in manufacturing are a big part of the problem. Meanwhile, construction output fell in January of this year. He has failed to support key parts of our economy and both manufacturing and construction are struggling.

In 2011, he first announced the electrification of the railway from Leeds to Manchester. Last year it was paused, without having started. His talk of a Northern Powerhouse, has been just talk and a shortage of technical skills means that he cannot deliver his promises even if he wants to.

He promised to crack down on tax avoidance and tax evasion. Yet, he has done a deal with Google, which generated £130m while the Italian government is set to collect £1bn. Meanwhile, small businesses see tax increases and cuts to grants including the growth accelerator, which have been successful at supporting manufacturing and jobs in small and medium sized firms up and down the country.

The chancellor has given councils in the wealthiest parts of the country like Surrey, millions of pounds more, with not a penny extra for Merseyside. Sefton Council has had its budget cut by nearly half. In Liverpool, it’s even higher. Yet the extra cash went to councils who had had no cuts at all.

Meanwhile, the chancellor gave tax handouts to those being paid more than £150,000 a year while cutting the pay of 2 million of the poorest working families by £1,600 through cuts in Universal Credit.

George Osborne has failed on his own measures. And that failure is being paid for by the many working people in this country and by businesses.

We need our government to invest in skills, in transport, housing, broadband and energy. We should support responsible businesses of all sizes who want to create good well-paid jobs.
Government’s priority should be a successful economy, supported by high quality public services.

The Chancellor has refused to borrow to invest in the infrastructure of our country. This is one reason for his failure to deliver by his own measures. There is a compelling business case for investment at historically low interest rates, which will produce a return on investment for our economy. Businesses borrow money to invest.

Home owners borrow money to buy a house. Both do so having demonstrated the ability to repay money. Governments should do so too and this government is making a big mistake in refusing to take a business like approach to investing for the future.

The approach of the Chancellor shows he is out of touch and unable to deliver for young or old, those in work or in retirement, for businesses, public services or for the voluntary sector. We need a change of approach, which invests in our economy and in our future. Sadly, the government record so far is heading in the wrong direction.