Tag Archives: #MentalHealthAwareness

Aside

Sixty Church of England bishops along with leaders of other religious groups, are urging ministers to rethink the two-child benefits cap. In a letter to the Times, they say the policy is likely to tip an extra 200,000 children into … Continue reading

More bad news for Conservatatives


In some parts of the country there will be no doubt be local government elections owing to the ward boundary changes this was the Conservative Government doing not Labour as they would love to spin it as it was labour’s fault. Think of it this way if you like or dislike marmite it’s more of the taste that left in your mouth under the conservatives in a nutshell to ensure that all the main political parties don’t have a overall majority or they want to create a return of a two horse race in politics. There is no doubt people will have heard of the government austerity plan which continues to affect local services by implementing cuts. Yet the government expects local services to continue to run smoothly with the cuts to public services. Some people are turning to foodbanks, soup kitchens, junk food projects on the grounds of being on low incomes or they have had a sanction on their universal credit for various reasons which leaves a nasty sting in your throat. Both the government and press loves to play the blame game to target immigrants to avoid addressing the real issues which they fail to mention that food, prescription, and energy prices are increasing this includes rail and plane fares. Families struggling to make ends meet will be hit by the biggest annual benefits cut for six years, according to a new analysis that exposes the impact of continuing austerity measures on the low paid.

It’s alleged that Chancellor Philip Hammond is preparing to give a stripped-down spring statement where he is expected to boast of lower than expected borrowing figures. He will use them to suggest Britain has reached a “turning point”. He will point to forecasts showing the “first sustained fall in debt for a generation” to claim “there is light at the end of the tunnel” in turning around Britain’s finances. The cuts will affect around 11 million families, including 5 million of the struggling families that the prime minister stated she would focus on. It is further alleged that there will also be some good news for the low paid, with more than 1.5 million workers set to benefit from a 4.4% pay rise when the national living wage increases from £7.50 to £7.83 at the start of April. However, that measure will be outweighed by the effective £2.5bn cuts to working-age benefits. While there were bigger cuts in 2012 when child benefit was removed from higher earners, this year’s squeeze will fall on low- and middle-income families. The new analysis suggests these families are set for an average loss of £190 this year alone, though some will be far worse off. There are four key benefit cuts this year. Working-age benefits will be frozen for a third year, saving £1.9bn and affecting almost 11 million families. The 3% real-terms cut in working-age benefits this year will be by far the biggest of the freeze, set to last four years. A measure limiting benefit claims to a family’s first two children, costing up to £2,780 for a family having a third child, saves £400m this year and affects 150,000 families. The withdrawal of the family element of support for new tax credit and universal credit claims from families with children will cost families up to £545. It saves the public purse £200m this year and will affect 400,000 families.

Finally, the rollout of the controversial universal credit system, which combines several benefits into one payment, saves £200m because some claimants have lower entitlements compared with the existing system, especially the long-term sick and working families. It comes just days after Paul Johnson, head of the respected Institute of Fiscal Studies, warned that Britain was nowhere near out of austerity. Theresa May’s alliance with the DUP is facing fresh criticism after it emerged that the Government is set to protect Northern Ireland from free school meal cuts due to be imposed on poor children in England. The cuts planned for England stand in sharp contrast to the situation in Northern Ireland, where children of the “working poor” will get stronger protection. In legislation due before MPs today, English families on universal credit will see the income threshold for free school meals slashed to £7,400 a year. But in Northern Ireland, where the Government has just taken direct control of spending budgets, the same threshold for eligibility will be nearly double that rate, at £14,000. Theresa May already faces claims that she has “bought” the Democratic Unionist Party’s support with a pledge of £1bn in extra funds for Northern Ireland, at a time when the rest of the UK continues to suffer from Tory austerity.

I don’t have a problem with city councils charging customers to use their council parking facilities but it must be proportionate but what residents strongly object to is when people from outside use residential car parking bays which is for the residents those people are denying the residents the use of their car parking space or outsiders parking on the pavements blocking wheelchair users and pedestrians access to the pavements they have to walk around the badly parked cars which is a constant nightmare and communities should take back control of their residence car parking by having a residential parking schemes in their area like what they do in some parts of the UK. It’s been purported in the daily mail of increased car parking charges for some local authorities to plug holes in their budget. Motorists face steep hikes in parking charges to plug holes in council budgets. Car park spaces and residents’ permits will cost up to 45 per cent more. Some town halls are bringing in fees on Sundays to catch shoppers and churchgoers. Householders are already facing an above-inflation rise in council tax next month, with bills expected to go up by as much as £100 for the average property. A number of local authorities are in extreme financial difficulties with much of the pressure coming from the rising cost of social care.

The Government has been accused of “papering over the cracks” after it announced a new funding formula for schools that will see budgets fall in real terms and which “does nothing” to reverse cuts that have already been made. Tory cuts are starving schools of the funding they need to deliver a first-class education. Crippling underfunding across our city is driving up class sizes and forcing schools to cut corners. Justine Greening, the former Education Secretary, said schools will be given a funding rise of 0.5 per cent per pupil next year and a 1 per cent increase in 2019-20. The most under-funded schools will see their budgets rise by 3 per cent. Ms Greening announced last July that an additional £1.3bn will be invested in primary and secondary education. However, the rise for most schools is lower than the current 2.9 per cent rate of inflation, meaning it equates to a funding cut in real terms. The former Education Secretary also made no mention of any plans to reverse previous cuts to school budgets, which Labour said have totalled £2.7bn in real terms since 2015. Under the new National Funding Formula, primary schools will receive a minimum of £3,500 per pupil and secondary schools will get £4,800. Announcing the changes, Ms Greening told MPs: “This is an historic reform. It means, for the first time, the resources that the Government is investing in our schools will be distributed according to a formula based on the individual needs and characteristics of every school in the country.”  “Addressing these simple but damaging inequalities will represent the biggest improvement in the school funding system for decades.”

Britain’s housebuilding sector shrank at its sharpest pace on record at the start of the year, according to official figures.

The 9% downturn was the biggest month-on-month fall shown by data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) going back to the start of 2010.

It contributed to a bigger-than-expected decline for the wider construction sector, which contracted by 3.4% – the largest since June 2012.

The setback is likely to come as a disappointment for ministers seeking to boost the number of homes.

There was speculation that the demise of construction giant Carillion may also have hit the figures. The ONS said it could not comment on the impact of individual firms.

Samuel Tombs, chief UK economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, said: “Rising interest rates and Brexit uncertainty are proving to be a toxic combination for the construction sector.”

Howard Archer, chief economic advisor to the EY ITEM Club, said: “The volatility of this sector suggests some bounceback is likely, although the recent bad weather presents a downside risk.”

Official figures also showed the manufacturing sector – which has been buoyed recently by the strength of the global economy and the weakness of the pound – only managed a rise of 0.1%, though it was the ninth month in a row of expansion.

GDP grew by just 1.7% last year – the slowest of the G7 advanced economies.

The slowdown has been attributed to the Brexit vote, which saw a collapse in the pound, driving up inflation and squeezing household spending, as well as creating business uncertainty seen as weighing on investment.

The Conservatives are braced for big losses in May’s local elections, after a poll found that few voters in London believe the party’s claim that its councils can spend less but still provide high-quality local services. The survey, commissioned by former Conservative treasurer Lord Ashcroft, suggests only three in ten voters in the capital see the Conservatives as the party of low council tax. A mere 18% believe Tory-run boroughs deliver on the promise of lower bills and better service. It will nevertheless make worrying reading at Conservative HQ, where analysts believe it may reflect a nationwide trend.

When I look into the conservative policies I’m more than convinced that there is more bad news for them in the form of a meltdown for them and I’m more incline too urge all to vote Labour on the 3 May in local elections 2018

 

Conservative panic over Housing crisis for Local Government Elections 2018


Just before declaring a snap general elections Theresa May had a majority in government she thought she would not win and toyed with the idea of courting her knight and shining in armour Vince Cable to save her party if there was another hung parliament but as if by magic a tree appeared in her office with money glowing in a dark corner of her office in 10 Downing Street. She wanted more power thinking Vince Cable would be so gullible to accept but only for him to turn down her proposition of marriage on the grounds of that a divorce proceedings would be within a year and did she think he had muggings written on his forehead after what happened in the last coalition.

Theresa May decided to turn her affections towards on her second best choice to be her sweetheart and husband to be Jeremy Corbyn. She declared I have a confession to make to you my sweetheart I want to marry you oh Jeremy Corbyn for more power in Parliament but after a few drinks of port she had a change of heart then contacts Jeremy Corbyn to say I have to break my engagement to you as you’re a vegan and I’m a meat eater. Jeremy Corbyn replies “Theresa there is no love lost between us I’m here to serve my country as your government continues with the dreaded austerity plan that hits the lowest paid this includes people with disabilities and mental health this will end in divorce, nothing you say will gain my trust in you and I rather stick to my principles thank you”.

After deciding to call for a snap general elections Theresa May lost her majority her affections and attention moved towards to her third and last choice Arlene Foster who was so gullible who decided to agree to a honey trap of an arranged marriage in return to pour some magic money tree in her favourite country called Northern Ireland and a further agreement of a confidence and supply vote in parliament not withstanding Ice Queen Theresa May laughing at her and trying to stab Arlene Foster in the back at the same time over brexit.

Sajid Javid (Housing Secretary) issued a stern warning to councils in England failing to build enough new homes could be stripped of planing powers. Councils will be told how many homes a year they must build and a failure to do so will see independent inspectors step in and he will be breathing down the necks of local authorities to ensure targets is met. It’s very rich of this government trying to addressing the housing issue and forgetting about homelessness and rough sleepers when they had 8 years to deal with it and not failing to mention it increased in UK by 162 percent this doesn’t address sofa-surfing and people staying in hostels. Poverty and Housing experts say that this appalling raise has been caused by crude government cuts to Housing Benefits a fall in investment in affordable homes reduced funding for homelessness services and a refusal to help private tenants. The bedroom tax and Universal Credit are making matters worse.

Theresa May and Sajid Javid are both living on cloud coco-land it’s alleged income inequality has been reduced since 2010 what planet are they living on they really need to smell the coffee they fail to recognize it has increased on their watch by offering people long-term solution of three year tenancies.  That is not long-term this does not resolve any problems.  The main cause of the present housing shortage is the right to buy.  Like many of us we are frustrated that as tenants we will never be able to live in London because of high house prices. Not many could not afford to buy or rent in London and tenants are being forced out to other regions.

No doubt the conservatives will carry on playing the blame game by saying that the previous government had 13 years to address it under their watch. If you check the records homelessness and rough sleepers increased when the coalition came into power under the austerity plan introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne by using the sound bite of the time which was the “ Big Society followed by We’re All In it Together”. They conveniently seem to have short memories came to mind so I take no lessons from this government introduced the right to buy scheme and failed to build more council housing.

Here is the full transcript of Theresa May speech:

On my first day as Prime Minister, I spoke on the steps of Downing Street about my desire to make this a country that works for everyone.

A country where, regardless of where you live, your race or religion, or what your parents do for a living, you have a fair chance to get on and build a life for yourself and your family.

It’s a philosophy that shapes everything this government does, and, over the past 18 months, we’ve done much to help turn vision into reality.

We’re reforming schools, colleges and universities so that all children and young people get the education that’s right for them.

We’re addressing failures in the justice system, making it more transparent so that racial disparities can be identified and ironed out.

We’re raising the national living wage, increasing the income tax personal allowance, and capping energy bills so that people are able to keep more of the money they’ve worked so hard to earn.

And, as I said at Mansion House on Friday, we’re negotiating a Brexit deal that works for the whole of the UK, so that nobody feels they have been left behind.

It’s all about making this country a fairer place for all, breathing fresh life into the British dream that every generation has a better future than the last.

But we cannot fulfil that dream, we cannot bring about the kind of society I want to see, unless we tackle one of the biggest barriers to social mobility we face today: the national housing crisis.

The causes and manifestations vary from place to place but the impact is all too clear: in much of the country, housing is so unaffordable that millions of people who would reasonably expect to buy their own home are unable to do so. Others are struggling even to find somewhere to rent.

The root cause of the crisis is simple. For decades this country has failed to build enough of the right homes in the right places.

It’s a problem that has plagued successive governments of all colours since post-war housebuilding peaked under the first Wilson administration.

But it was from the mid-1990s that the failure to match demand with supply really began to push prices upwards. In 1997, the average home cost 3.5 times the average wage. By 2010, that ratio had more than doubled.

Higher prices brought with them higher rents, so prospective first-time buyers found themselves able to save less and less even as the size of the deposit they needed grew and grew.

The result is a vicious circle from which most people can only escape with help from the Bank of Mum and Dad. If you’re not lucky enough to have such support, the door to home ownership is all too often locked and barred.

Talking to voters during last year’s election campaign, it was clear that many people, particularly younger people, are angry about this.

Angry that, regardless of how hard they work, they won’t be able to buy a place of their own. Angry when they’re forced to hand more and more of their wages to a landlord to whom their home is simply a business asset. Angry that, no matter how many sacrifices they make to save for a deposit, they’ll never be able to compete with someone whose parents have released equity from their own home to help their children buy.

They’re right to be angry. Income inequality is down since 2010, thanks in part to increases in the personal allowance and the National Living Wage. But wealth inequality continues to rise. And, as figures such as Matthew Rognlie argue, it is housing wealth – unearned, and offering huge returns – that lies at the heart of this growing disparity.

But the impact of rising prices goes beyond the simple division between housing haves and have-nots. This crisis of un-affordability is also creating a crisis of almost literal social immobility.

Think of the skilled, experienced worker who is offered a promotion but can’t afford to take it up because it would mean moving to a town or city where he can’t afford to live.

Think of the talented young woman from a working-class background who can’t afford to take an entry-level professional job because she wouldn’t be able to live nearby.

It’s not so hard to accept that door-opening internship in London if your parents own a large house in central London. It’s a much greater challenge if you share a room with your siblings in a North Wales terrace.

So the shortage of housing in this country reinforces inequality. It prevents social mobility and stops people fulfilling their potential. It creates and exacerbates divisions between generations and between those who own property and those who do not.

And it undermines something more, something less tangible but just as important. The sense of community, of belonging, of responsibility that comes with owning your own home or having an affordable, secure, long-term tenancy.

I still vividly remember the first home that I shared with my husband, Philip. Not only our pictures on the walls and our books on the shelves, but also the security that came from knowing we couldn’t be asked to move on at short notice.

And because we had that security, because we had a place to go back to, it was that much easier to play an active role in our community. To share in the common purpose of a free society.

That is what this country should be about – not just having a roof over your head but having a stake in your community and its future. All that is put at risk by the mismatch between housing supply and housing demand and the soaring prices that have resulted.

Now, this Government is already taking action to help hard-pressed buyers. We’re putting an extra £10 billion into Help to Buy, giving another 135,000 families a step up the property ladder. We’re scrapping stamp duty for 80 per cent of first-time buyers, and looking at ways to make the whole process of buying and selling homes quicker, easier and cheaper.

But to stop the seemingly endless rise in house prices, we simply have to build more homes – especially in the places where un-affordability is greatest.

Doing so requires action on many fronts, and at the very heart of the matter is the planning process. Planning professionals may not be as visible as the bricklayers and carpenters and roofers. But we cannot build the homes we need without them.

Because if there’s one thing I learned from my time working on housing at Merton Council, it’s that good planning is all about detail. It’s very easy for a politician to stand up and say he or she will build however many homes in however many years. But it’s an empty promise if they don’t also address the hundreds of smaller issues that underpin it.

Where in the country will they be built? In which communities? On what sites? What kind of homes will they be? What infrastructure will be needed to support them? Will these plans be imposed from above, or will local people have a say on what happens in their area?

These are the kind of questions that need to be answered by anyone who is serious about getting homes built. They’re the kind of questions that are asked every day by planning professionals. And they’re the kind of questions this government is answering with the new, fairer, more effective planning rules that we’re launching today.

When used incorrectly, as was the case for so many years, planning policy creates barriers to building, tying up councils in red tape and allowing developers to game the system. But in the right hands it can be a powerful tool with which to shape, regulate and drive the construction of homes in this country.

So this government is rewriting the rules on planning. With the major overhaul being published today, we’re giving councils and developers the backing they need to get more homes built more quickly. More homes at prices that are affordable for first-time buyers. More homes for the NHS staff, teachers, firefighters and other key workers on whom all communities depend. More homes for rent on family-friendly, three-year tenancies.

We’re streamlining the planning process, so that much-needed homes aren’t held up by endless appeals and bureaucracy.

We’re making it easier for neglected and abandoned commercial sites to be turned into housing.

And we’re making sure councils do all they can to find sites, grant planning permissions and build homes. That includes creating a nationwide standard that shows how many homes authorities need to plan for in their area – making the system fairer and more transparent.

Our new rules will also see to it that the right infrastructure is in place to support such developments. When people oppose large-scale development in their area, it’s often because they’re worried their village or town simply won’t be able to bear the weight of hundreds of new arrivals.

Their schools are already full, their roads are already congested, the waiting list at their GP is already too long. They want to know that any new homes will be accompanied by appropriate new facilities and infrastructure.

Under our new planning rules, that’s exactly what will happen. And local communities will be put at the heart of the planning process by seeing to it that all areas have an up-to-date plan.

Yet we must not lose sight of the fact that planning for the homes we need is not the same as building the homes we need. After all, families can’t live in a planning permission. A well-designed local plan won’t keep your children safe and warm at night.

The reforms driven forward under our last Prime Minister led to a great and welcome increase in the number of planning permissions granted. But we did not see a corresponding rise in the number of homes being built.

All that is changing.

The Secretary of State for Housing, Sajid Javid, along with his ministerial team and their officials, are doing incredible work in tackling failings at every level of the housing sector.

And I’ve taken personal charge of meeting the housing challenge, leading a task-force that brings together ministers and officials from every corner of Whitehall to attack the crisis on every front.

Because, while planning reform is part of the answer, all the evidence shows that just reforming planning and expecting the existing developers to build all the homes we need is pie in the sky.

Of course they have a clear and vital role to play, but the government must also step in homes are going to get built.

So we’re committing at least £44 billion of capital funding, loans and guarantees to support our housing market. We’ve changed the rules so authorities facing the greatest affordability pressures can access the finance they need to build more council homes for local people.

We’ve given Homes England a more muscular, proactive role in the process of site assembly, bringing together patches of land to create a coherent site suitable for development.

We’re investing in innovative modern construction methods that get more homes built more quickly.

The £5 billion Housing Infrastructure Fund has already made its first awards, investing almost £900 million in the roads, cycle paths, flood defences and other essential works that will allow for the construction of up to 200,000 homes that would otherwise not get built.

And we’ve put an additional £1.5 billion into the Home Building Fund, helping smaller developers deliver homes that don’t attract finance from the private sector. As one builder put it after finishing a development in Derbyshire: “The banks were very sceptical and very unhelpful. The Home Building Fund finance made all the difference.”

The results are clear. In 2016/17 net additions to England’s housing supply reached some of the highest levels seen for a generation. More than 217,000 homes of all types and tenures providing a place to live for couples, families and individuals right across the country.

The number of people buying their first home has reached its highest level in more than a decade: 365,000 last year, with an average age of 30.

Yet there remains much to do. The gap between permissions granted and homes built is still too large. The new, fairer planning rules we’re publishing today will help to close it. But it’s also time for builders and developers to step up and do their bit.

The bonuses paid to the heads of some of our biggest developers are based not on the number of homes they build but on their profits or share price. In a market where lower supply equals higher prices that creates a perverse incentive, one that does not encourage them to build the homes we need.

Oliver Letwin is currently reviewing the causes of the planning permission gap. If he finds evidence of unjustifiable delay, I will not rule out any options for ending such practices.

That may include allowing councils to take a developer’s previous rate of build-out into account when deciding whether to grant planning permission. I want to see planning permissions going to people who are actually going to build houses, not just sit on land and watch its value rise.

Where councils are allocating sufficient land for the homes people need, our new planning rulebook will stop developers building on large sites that aren’t allocated in the plan – something that’s not fair on residents who agree to a plan only to see it ignored.

And, by ending abuse of the “viability assessment” process, we’re going to make it much harder for unscrupulous developers to dodge their obligation to build homes local people can afford.

The Government will make sure land is available for homes and make sure our young people have the skills needed to build them. In return, I expect developers to do their duty for Britain and build the homes our country needs.

Public investments in infrastructure and schemes such as Help to Buy have provided a real boost to house builders. If they want that to continue, they will have to raise their game.

But that doesn’t have to mean destroying the country we love.

This is not an overcrowded nation. Only around 10 per cent of England has been built on. We are not faced with a zero-sum choice between building the homes people need and protecting the open spaces we treasure.

That’s why the answer to our housing crisis does not lie in tearing up the Green Belt. Barely 13 per cent of this country is covered by such a designation, but it serves a valuable and very specific purpose.

Not protecting beautiful scenery, unique wildlife or accessible landscapes. For that we have National Parks, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, heritage coastline and more. Indeed, our new planning rules also include stronger protections for ancient woodland and historic coastlines everywhere.

No, the defining characteristic of Green Belt land is not its beauty or its greenness, but its openness. Green Belts exist not to preserve landscapes but to prevent urban sprawl. That is what they were created for in the 1950s and that is the valuable purpose they still serve today.

Where cities surrounded by Green Belts still need more homes, we can increase housing density, make better use of brownfield sites, build upwards rather than outwards.

Our new planning rules make it easier to do this, allowing for minimum densities around transport hubs and city centres so that more homes can be built in areas with the highest demand.

They also support conversions of empty spaces over shops and upward extensions, allowing planners to make the most efficient use of available space and helping families to extend their homes.

Planning rules already say that Green Belt boundaries should be changed only in “exceptional circumstances”. But too many local authorities and developers have been taking a lax view of what “exceptional” means. They’ve been allocating Green Belt sites for development as an easy option rather than a last resort.

To prevent this, we’re strengthening existing protections so that authorities can only amend Green Belt boundaries if they can prove they have fully explored every other reasonable option for building the homes their community needs.

In the handful of cases where land does have to be removed, councils and developers will have to find ways to offset the impact.

And our 25-year environment plan commits us to leaving the natural environment in a better state than we found it. So we’ll expect any development, whether in the Green Belt or outside it, to look first at sites that have previously been built on rather than opting immediately for virgin countryside.

I’d rather see an ugly, disused power station demolished and replaced with attractive housing than a wood or open field concreted over – even if the former is in the Green Belt and the latter is not.

This concerted action, in planning and beyond, will get more homes built and bring home ownership back within the grasp of ordinary people.

But while ownership is a wonderful thing, there is nothing inherently wrong with renting your home. More than a third of English households rent at present, and almost all of us will do so at some point in our lives – I know I have.

Yet the tragedy of Grenfell Tower shone a spotlight on experiences shared by too many tenants. The fire took place in a local authority tower block, but the stories we’ve heard from the people who lived there – concerns not being acted on, voices not being listened to, needs being ignored – were all too familiar to tenants in all kinds of homes across the country.

Whether you’re renting by choice or necessity, you’re not any less of a person for doing so and you should not be treated as such. But the rise in houses prices has helped create a rental market in which bad practice can flourish, where people can be exploited, and where tenants are all too often seen as an inconvenient commercial necessity rather than as individuals with rights and needs.

Private landlords play an important role in the housing market. Talk to tenants, however, and you’ll repeatedly hear complaints that people are paying more and more for less and less. So this government is taking action to clean up the rental market and bring down the cost of renting.

Too many tenants have got used to being hit with rip-off fees by letting agents, facing huge upfront bills to check references or sign contracts. That’s simply not fair, so we’re banning letting agents from charging most tenants any fees at all.

Families face being uprooted every six months when their leases expire, so we’re working to make longer tenancies the norm.

Rogue landlords have been flouting rules that protect tenants’ rights and safety. So we’ve given local authorities new powers to crack down on such behaviour, and we’re backing legislation that will ensure all rental properties are fit for human habitation.

With no regulation in property management, the door has been open to cowboy agents – with tenants, leaseholders, freeholders and honest agents all paying the price. That’s why we’re working with reputable property managers and their clients to clean up and regulate the sector.

Our new planning rules encourage providers to build more homes specifically for rent, so supply goes up and rents come down.

And, later this year, our social housing green paper will look at what more can be done to ensure everyone living in social housing is treated fairly.

Whether in the private or social sector, renting your home should be affordable, safe and fair – and I’m working hard to make sure that’s the case.

Just as Grenfell highlighted failings in parts of the housing sector, so the tragic deaths of rough sleepers have reminded us of the plight of those forced to live on the streets.

And let me take this opportunity to thank the thousands of council staff, charity workers, volunteers and members of the emergency services who have done so much to help rough sleepers during the recent cold weather.

In 2018, in one of the world’s largest, strongest economies, nobody should be without a roof over their head. This isn’t just a British problem – in recent years homelessness has risen across Europe – but it is source of national shame nonetheless.

That’s why we pledged in our manifesto to halve rough sleeping by 2022 and eliminate it altogether by 2027. We’ve already committed £1 billion to help bring this about, and are piloting the Housing First approach in three of our great cities to see how it can work in this country.

We’re also implementing the Homelessness Reduction Act, to help more people sooner. We’ve changed the rules around funding so local government can use £400 million to help prevent homelessness, instead of just responding to it. And we’ve changed the law so councils can place families into private rented accommodation – meaning they get a safe, secure suitable place sooner.

But it’s not just about housing. Homeless people often have complex needs, so we’re taking unprecedented action across the board to help address them.

Here in London, 47 per cent of rough sleepers have mental health needs. That’s why we’re spending record levels on mental health support.

Forty four per cent need help to overcome alcoholism, so we’re spending around £200 million on treatment for alcoholism every year.

And 35 per cent need help for drug misuse, which is why our new Drug Strategy will protect the most vulnerable and help them turn their lives around.

There’s undoubtedly more to do. But we’re taking action that will make a real difference.

Because this is a government that isn’t afraid to uncover and face up to challenges. And that’s exactly what we’re doing with homelessness, and with the wider housing crisis.

More than 70 years ago, Anthony Eden told the world that “the ownership of property is not a crime or a sin, but a reward, a right and a responsibility that must be shared as equitably as possible among all our citizens.”

This country agrees with him. For decades after, home ownership steadily grew as more and more people acquired and passed on not just a patch of land but a stake in their communities, a piece of our shared society.

Yet ownership peaked in 2003. With prices rising and affordability falling, we became a nation where buying your own home went from a shared aspiration to a distant dream. Where rising rents led to an increasingly rootless population. Where housing wealth coalesced in the hands of those lucky enough to be on the property ladder, creating division, increasing inequality and undermining communities.

The British dream is about each generation being better off than the last, but today’s young people are forced to spend three times more of their income on housing than was the case for their grandparents.

The picture we see today is the result of many failures by many people over many years. Fixing it won’t happen overnight. But the size of the challenge is matched only by the strength of my ambition to tackle it.

More home ownership. A rental market that works for tenants. Greater fairness for all.

That is what the people of this country need.

That is what will make this a society that truly works for everyone.

And, as Prime Minister, that is what I am determined to deliver.

Whilst I concur it sounds very good with their new found sound bite on housing I can’t help thinking that there is Local Government elections on 3 May 2018 the Tory Government are in panic mode they seem to have forgotten they have cut funds to councils across the UK am I missing a trick or two here. Housing continues to be the problem of both successful governments. No doubt it still comes across as a talking shop and less action. Let’s see more action from this government it is highly noticeable this government has a very good track record of u-turns on a number of their so called policies since they have taken office. I have to say it needs more meat on the bone and is a feeble measure being proposed.

I’m afraid I’m not convinced of the proposal on housing and I would urge all to vote Labour on 3 May 2018

Where is the Conservative values, oh yes hit the plebs where it hurts who are on the dole


I salute all unsung heroines on the grounds of its a 100 years since women were first granted to the right to vote and proud to stand shoulder to shoulder with all women who use their right to vote, the downside of this women are still fighting for gender equality and equal pay. How long will they have to wait for another 100 years to achieve their aims and objectives surely this is not right. Women still face abuses and harassment from all walks of life even today which is wrong. Parliamentarians should do more to address this, sure there is legislation to address this but more needs to be done to address this in a form of zero torrence.

Debt crisis has increased by four times faster than wages in UK. Data published by UK Finance shows households had outstanding loans worth £37bn in 2016/17. It’s no surprise that Christians Against Poverty (CAP) said January 2018 was its busiest ever month for people seeking debt advice.

British companies are facing a recruitment crisis, with labour shortages hitting critical levels in some sectors, according to a business leader who has urged the government to produce details on a post-Brexit immigration system. The director general of the British Chambers of Commerce said the lack of candidates for some jobs was biting hard, and he warned ministers against bringing forward a “draconian and damaging” visa or work permit system.

Surveys by the BCC showed that nearly three-quarters of firms trying to recruit had been experiencing difficulties “at or near the highest levels since [BCC] records began over 25 years ago”, he said. Marshall said the failure of ministers to act swiftly could force companies out of operation. “The simple fact is that many businesses can’t afford to wait much longer for a clear UK immigration policy to emerge,” he said, pointing to further delays to the government’s immigration white paper, an early draft of which was leaked to the Guardian. Meanwhile, a spokesman for Angela Merkel has called for details on British demands after Brexit ahead of a meeting with Theresa May on Friday.

The prime minister went to Berlin for a bilateral session with Merkel, the German chancellor, which is expected to cover security cooperation and trading relationships. May is then due to give the next speech in the government’s “road to Brexit” series in Munich. Merkel’s spokesman said the EU27 wanted a close and deep relationship with the UK, but added: “It is important for us for Britain to make concrete its ideas.”

The moves by May and senior ministers to flesh out more details over the next fortnight, with a series of speeches and cabinet away-days at Chequers, has led to a spike in pressure for different outcomes after Brexit. Merkel’s spokesman said the EU27 wanted a close and deep relationship with the UK, but added: “It is important for us for Britain to make concrete its ideas.”

The moves by May and senior ministers to flesh out more details over the next fortnight, with a series of speeches and cabinet away-days at Chequers, has led to a spike in pressure for different outcomes after Brexit.

Well blow me over a Labour policy is being promoted by Nicky Morgan (Chairwoman of Treasury Select Committee) says the return of maintenance grants could also remove barriers. The Treasury Select Committee is unconvinced by questionable claims in support of charging up to 6.1 percent on loans that cover fees and living cost. The report comes as the government prepares to unveil its review of university funding in England. There is no justification for such high interest rates on student loans.

Very intriguing to see the Joseph Rowntree Foundation stating housing supply has falling short of demand by 30,000 every year since 2011. This cumulative shortfall could reach 335,000 by the end of this parliament trapping families in insecure housing as a result. The short fall of new affordable homes in England will soon be equivalent to a city the size of Leeds.

Theresa May is facing a growing revolt among party donors, with one senior backer warning that the Tories will be “decimated” at an election unless the prime minister ends her indecision and shows leadership. With mounting accusations across the party that May is dithering over Brexit and lacking an inspiring domestic agenda, Sir John Hall, the former owner of Newcastle United, told the press that the prime minister was facing a make-or-break period of her premiership.

The north-east businessman, who has given the Tories more than £500,000 since 2007 and helped fund May’s snap election, said the prime minister needed to make clear where she wanted to take the country, even if doing so led to her removal. “She’s got to take the bull by the horns and say, ‘this is the road we are going. Do your damnedest – if you want to vote me out, vote me out’,” he said. “But we have to appear stronger. And we have to appear that we are going to make change, because we are not even looking at domestic affairs.

“It is up to Theresa now to convince everybody that she can be the leader who can stay. I think that’s the way most people in the party are looking at it. Show us your leadership. This is the time to stand up and show it.”

He added: “If we tried to change the leader now, would there be a danger of having to have an election? If we had an election, I reckon we’d be decimated. To me as a donor, the Conservative party has to look at itself in terms of where we’re going. She has got to stay, in my view, to such time that someone else comes forward. A new leader has to emerge – or she has to come through very strongly.” Other senior Tory donors have become increasingly frustrated. Some who backed Remain are particularly concerned at the government’s performance during the Brexit negotiations. “It has been like a Premier League team playing their best against Tranmere Rovers playing their worst,” said one senior backer.

Queen May will attempt to deal with the accusations of indecision by making her long-awaited speech on her Brexit plans in three weeks’ time. She will deliver it after senior ministers set out Britain’s “road to Brexit” in a series of keynote speeches, beginning this week with Boris Johnson, who will attempt to make the case for a “liberal Brexit” designed to reassure Remain voters, followed by an address by May on security co-operation. Brexit secretary David Davis and trade secretary Liam Fox will also give speeches, but Chancellor Philip Hammond and home secretary Amber Rudd – the leading advocates of a soft Brexit – have not been included. David Lidington, the Cabinet Office minister who campaigned for Remain, will give an address.

May’s allies said the speech would reveal more about the degree to which she wants Britain to diverge from EU rules. The speech will take place after senior ministers gather for an away day in Chequers, the prime minister’s country retreat, to hammer out a position they can all accept.

Concerns increased last week as government sources said little had been decided after two cabinet Brexit committee meetings designed to find a common position on leaving the EU. Britain’s relationship to the customs union remains a major sticking point. Attempts to find a solution tha removes the need for a hard border in Ireland have been deemed “unworkable” by some in government.

Hall said he was concerned by the lack of a domestic agenda and called on May to back “capitalism with a social conscience”. Having voted for Remain, he also said he would now back May walking away from Brexit negotiations if she believed the EU was trying to “blackmail” Britain.“When things are against you and you are carrying forward a lot of problems, which she has done, it may be time [for a new leader], but I’m not inside the party,” he said. “The way things are going at the moment, I am horrified at the way that we are destroying ourselves from within. I’ve seen it before with John Major’s government. We cannot have that.

“She’s got to convince myself as a donor that in a sense, she is going to take the party forward so we can get another four or five years. I’m thinking, ‘where is the party going to go’? They have to convince me they have the balls to win the next election. Labour does not have a big lead in the polls. It’s all to play for.”

A Tory donor has paid £55,000 to spend a day with Theresa May, in an auction at the party’s annual Black and White fundraising ball.
The event allows wealthy Conservative donors to spend time with cabinet ministers – as long as they stump up about £10,000 a table.
As well as the prime minister, senior ministers who attended the ball on Wednesday night at the Natural History Museum in South Kensington included the foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, the chancellor, Philip Hammond, and the home secretary, Amber Rudd. Jacob Rees-Mogg, who recently topped a ConservativeHome poll on who should be the next party leader, was also there.
Stanley Johnson, the foreign secretary’s father and a former MEP, said a bidder had paid about £55,000 in the silent auction for the privilege of spending a working day with May. Other auction lots included a dinner at a restaurant hosted by Stanley Johnson and the Made in Chelsea star Georgia Toffolo – who appeared together on the ITV reality show I’m a Celebrity – which went for £15,000.  Johnson described the evening as a “wonderful event” and said he thought the prime minister’s speech about the benefits of Brexit was “very good”.

Frankly I don’t know whether to laugh, cry or bang my head on the wall, has our nation become a nanny state or a nation of dictatorship. According to a Conservative MP (Jeremy Lefroy) families should switch off their television(s) and play games together. TV and social media stopped families talking to each other. Family breakdowns were overlooked as a cause of mental health problems in children.

A million children whose parents claim Universal Credit will miss out on free school meals because of a new earnings threshold, it was claimed.  Children’s Minister Nadhim Zahawi has announced children in Universal Credit-claiming families with net earnings less than £7,400 will be entitled for free school meals. Zahawi said the move will see an extra 50,000 children entitled to help. But the Children’s Society and Labour have described the move as “a huge step backwards” that will see a million children who would have qualified miss out. Every child whose parent claims Universal Credit was due to qualify for free school meals from April, but the Government decided to make changes. While the new threshold is £7,400 per year, ministers say once benefits are taken into account, a typical family earning that amount will take home between £18,000 and £24,000. A million children whose parents claim Universal Credit will miss out on free school meals because of a new earnings threshold, it was claimed. Children’s Minister Nadhim Zahawi has announced children in Universal Credit-claiming families with net earnings less than £7,400 will be entitled for free school meals.  Zahawi said the move will see an extra 50,000 children entitled to help. But the Children’s Society and Labour have described the move as “a huge step backwards” that will see a million children who would have qualified miss out. Every child whose parent claims Universal Credit was due to qualify for free school meals from April, but the Government decided to make changes. While the new threshold is £7,400 per year, ministers say once benefits are taken into account, a typical family earning that amount will take home between £18,000 and £24,000.

Whilst I concur with the statement from a committee of MPs one thing comes to mind where is the magic money tree to fund this idea given that local government has been cut by around 80 percent in some cases. To me its just more lip service given our government keeps on harping on about austerity. A committee of MPs calls on government to develop a new national strategy to deal with older people’s housing needs. Proposals includes funding for handymen service age proofing all new build homes and a national helpline to offer advice on housing options. Older people should be given more help with housing to help them stay healthy and reduce the need for residential care.

The Government’s flagship welfare programme has been dealt another blow as it was revealed claimants who forget their log-in details for the website cannot easily reset them. Instead, universal credit online users have to attend a face-to-face interview at a job centre to receive a new password.

Ministers have been aware of the issue for more than a month but have refused to set a date to fix it. Ged Killen, Labour MP for Rutherglen and Hamilton West, said he was worried for claimants as his constituency was a “full-service” area for the universal credit programme. He had raised the issue at Prime Minister’s Questions on Wednesday, urging Theresa May to set a deadline for fixing the service.

She should delay closing any more job centres, he said, until welfare claimants could perform “basic online functions” to manage their benefits. Mr Killen added that HMRC and some banks already offer such services. Mrs May responded by promising to ask Work and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey to “look carefully at ensuring a date is identified when that change is going to be made”.

The answer failed to satisfy Mr Killen, who said it was “beyond satire” that a “basic ‘reset your password'” function could not be added to the benefits online portal. “If your bank didn’t let you reset your password online, you might leave and find another bank,” he chided. “Universal credit claimants however are not given that choice.”

A spokesperson for the Department for Work and Pensions have replied by saying We are looking at updating our systems to allow a password reset function that maintains the highest level of protection for people’s personal information.” A source added there were “security considerations” and that other online services with highly sensitive information did not easily let people request new passwords. It is the latest in a series of controversies that has befallen the universal credit welfare programme, which combines six benefits into one single payment. For this reason I would urge all to vote Labour on the 3rd May 2018 in the Local Government.

 

 

The tables have turned against Tory In disarray with infighting


Notice how Cabinet Ministers are not willing to speak out against injustice and as soon as they get their marching orders back to the back-benches they decide to speak out against the injustices. Well Justine Greening falls in this category, she decided that maintenance grants should be reinstated for poorer students after being scrapped by her government last year and she is saying that she raised concerns about the level of interest on student loans and any student finance system needed to be progressive. Does anybody think that there will be another u-turn approaching anytime soon? I think not.

It comes as no surprise there has been another u-turn from Government Ministers in a row over paying Higher Disability Benefits to 165,000 people by saying they will not contesting a high court decision. Work and Pensions Secretary said she will not appeal December’s judgement over over payments to people with mental health condition. Me thinks ministers would lose face and they are in fear of losing votes in the next general elections in 2020 with the disabled community. Another major U-turn by the Tories who previously scuppered two attempts by the Labour backbencher to achieve this reform. Housing Secretary Sajid Javid’s declared backing for Karen Buck’s private member’s Bill to empower tenants to sue landlords for failing to keep homes fit for human habitation could be an important step forward. Karen Buck’s first bid to amend the 1985 Landlord and Tenant Act to require residential rented accommodation to be “provided and maintained in a state of fitness for human habitation” was talked out by Tory MPs in 2015. There was a second bite at the cherry when Labour’s shadow housing minister Teresa Pearce took up Buck’s initiative, moving an amendment to the Housing and Planning Bill 2015-16, and a vote took place at least.

Infighting between David Davis and Jacob Rees-Mogg has shown its ugly head in the Tories Cabinet over trade deal pledge for UK. It seems to me as I read into it, it sounds like whatever gives them the briefing they decided to take it out on each other instead singing the same tune. Conservative backbenchers line up to criticised Philip Hammond for saying changes to UK – EU relation could be “very modest”

According to another Conservative Member of Parliament (Theresa Villiers) a former cabinet member “A real danger” UK will sign up to an agreement with Brussels which could ‘keep us in the EU in all but name” this comes at a time when Conservative party over Brexit. The question I put it to all conservative members and their supporters who is in charge of the conservatives is Boris Johnson, Philip Hammond, Jacob Ress-Mogg, David Davis or Theresa May as it seems to me that the left and does not know what the right hand and who is ready to stab their leader in the front or in the back. To save face David Davis is now saying there is no difference between himself, Philip Hammond and Theresa May. Sure for the many and not the few believes you Philip Hammond could it be that you are likely to lose your job at the next cabinet reshuffle and you are running scared if so keep on running away.

Here comes the charm offence from a Conservative Cabinet Minister(David Lidington) Conservatives must come together in a spirit of mutual respect amid a row over Brexit negotiations. All hand on deck panic mode is on from another ex-minister Anna Soubry she said the PM must not let the 35 Tory MPs dictate the terms of UK’s EU exit. Theresa May has been warned the UK risks disaster unless she sees off hard brexiteers in her own party amid continuing Tory divisions over Europe. She is willing to leave if the likes of Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg take over. The Prime Minister’s red lines to leave the EU single market and customs union are wrong. I wonder what her constituents has to say about this and when last was she was seen in her constituency. A Tory peer (Lord Bridges) warned Britain can’t just muddle through brexit by keeping every option open is no longer an option. Ministers appeared unsure of what they wanted after leaving and the void was filled by conflicting confusing voices.

As much as I don’t vote or like any Tory policies I have to say that this chap has a point in a nutshell he is saying get your act together and bring forward a workable plan and stop pussyfooting around.

According to Robert Hannigan and Sir John Sawers the UK needs a data sharing deal with Europe to prevent serious problems for security and the economy the two former intelligence chiefs have said. It will be a mistake if the UK’s strengths in the field became a bargaining chip in Brexit talks. Former MI6 chief John Sawers said the talks were zero sum game. Ex-GCHQ head Robert Hannigan said it would not be ethical to threaten to withhold material which might stop terrorism.

It’s alleged that Treasury officials were trying to influence policy to stay in the EU Customs Union which a question was put to the Brexit Minister (Steve Baker) by Jacob Rees-Mogg. Is this some form of conspiracy theory I wonder, or is this another attempt to destabilise his dear leader Ice Queen (Theresa May) whilst she is touring China to drum up trade between the two nation.

Theresa May is under increasing pressure to set where she stands on Britain future trade agreements. She said Britain would not face a choice between a free trade deal with the EU after Brexit and striking deals with the rest of the world. This comes in light of Tory Eurosceptic MPs are claiming that she is heading for a Brexit in name only.

Another senior Conservative MP (Bernard Jenkin) alleged ministers are being vague and divided over Brexit and has singled out the chancellor for criticism urging him to back the Prime Minister to deliver a clean EU exit. Theresa May should stick to her present policy despite the Treasury having its own house view. This is in light of key ministerial meetings on the UK and EU relationship.

Michael Barnier was speaking in Downing Street the time had come for the UK to choose what it wanted after its 2019 exit. UK will face unavoidable barriers to trade if it leaves the customs union and single market.

A Facebook friend of mine Gary Hills sums it very eloquently in a nutshell when he said:

May is embarrassed – but I’m livid –

Even the British government is skeptical of Brexit, as it turns out. BuzzFeed News obtained a new government impact assessment gauging what life might be like after Britain formally leaves the European Union. It does not look pretty, according to the report:

“Under a comprehensive free trade agreement with the EU, UK growth would be 5 percent lower over the next 15 years compared to current forecasts, according to the analysis.

“The ‘no deal’ scenario, which would see the UK revert to World Trade Organization (WTO) rules, would reduce growth by 8 percent over that period. The softest Brexit option of continued single-market access through membership of the European Economic Area would, in the longer term, still lower growth by 2 percent.

“These calculations do not take into account any short-term hits to the economy from Brexit, such as the cost of adjusting the economy to new customs arrangements…

“Asked why the prime minister was not making the analysis public, a [government] source told BuzzFeed News: ‘Because it’s embarrassing.’

It’s further alleged all Conservative members of a town council have resigned after bullying, abuse, and harassment of the former chairman and her family Jane peace stood down from Desborbough Town council in Northamptonshire 10 Tory Councillors have resigned from the 12 person council.

Intriguingly MPs are calling for government commissioners to take over the running of a county council which has banned almost all spending. Northamptonshire County Council has brought in a section 114 notice banning new expenditure. Despite this legal obligations have seen it issue a budget for 2018/19 allow a council tax precept to be set. The county seven MPs have confirmed they have lost confidence authority’s leadership.

This make a change that the press and social media are not gunning for Labour but instead they are more focus on the Conservatives. Lets hope this will continue to divide the Nasty Party. This year in some parts of UK there will be Local Government elections taking place this is the ideal time to make the changes in your community by voting Labour

 

Staire: Continue to Vote conservative and get more of the same


Many people doing such great things to feed and clothe and shelter the homeless and rough sleepers during Christmas and New Year’s Eve. What if we all pool our energy and efforts to support groups like Acorn and Shelter and other charities to say Housing and Services are needed now.

Whilst I acknowledge the Commonwealth games seem a great opportunity unless we deal with the very real tragedy of homelessness and rough sleepers (drugs, begging) literally on our doorstep are we going to end up with death squads clearing the streets so tourists (with cash) don’t have to see them. It is austerity and capitalism and rich people avoiding taxes that underlie these problems.

Don’t know whether to laugh or cry over the recent reshuffle one minute Jeremy Hunt is going as reported then it’s suddenly “Please miss let me stay and give an added responsibility by adding social care on top of my profile to say Heath and Social Care. In reply Ice Queen (Theresa May) yes my dear it’s granted. Poor old Justine Greening wanting to hold on to her post and stood her grounds only for her to leave in tears from Downing St by quitting before she face the sack.
The princess of darkness(Esther Mcvey) who is loathe by the disabled community takes on the post of DWP minister who is the former minister for employment.

Have a listen to this  about our beloved NHS Youtube:

Our NHS is in crisis caused by lack of funding, bed blocking, staff morale down, they are over worked and underpaid. The lame excuse from Ice Queen (Theresa May) was expected by giving a half-baked apology then then she has the gull to say that more investments has been put in NHS. This reminds me of a song Nick Clegg I’m sorry see YouTube below:

Hospitals in England are now seeing very high rates of patients with flu according to Public Health England figures up to 78% in this week they suggest it could be the worst flu season for seven years.

Am I seeing doubles now, who remembers the advert on the Leave Bus campaign claiming our beloved National Health Service(NHS) will be better of by £350 million it now transpired its too low it should be £362 million and raise to £438 million by the end of the end of the post Brexit transition period see article below:

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/jan/15/leave-campaigns-350m-claim-was-too-low-says-boris-johnson

To sum it up nicely Paula Peters a Facebook friend puts it very eloquently in her poems:

The NHS is in Crisis Budget squeezed and now it is lifeless
21 NHS trusts declared a black alert The Tories excuses are bloody absurd Patients sleeping on corridor floors

Doctors and nurses working all hours, can’t take anymore
Operations cancelled, outpatient appointments too
Theresa May does not have a bloody clue

Patients denied the treatment that they really need
Tories cutting the heart from the NHS and watching it bleed
Many doctors and nurses positions left unfilled
Tories want private healthcare, where patients will be billed

Tories want Richard Branson and circle healthcare
Well we want the NHS, so stop right there!
Branson can’t run a GP service, or any health care trust
We must rise up in large numbers, put a stop to him we must

We all use a GP service, and may need an A and E
We may need orthopaedics and neurology!
We want the NHS fully staffed and fully funded
We want the NHS that Nye Bevan founded.

Iain Duncan Smith the architect of Universal Credit
Wanted everyone working, yes he said it
Designed with punitive punishment at its heart
Universal Credit is about ripping the welfare state apart

Work more hours! Go get a job!
Denying you support, DWP cheats and robs
Ramping up sanctions, they simply don’t care
They want you to work for nothing on workfare

Universal Credit is failing, many people say
But the Government are continuing the roll out, come what may
It is now the co production of the DWP and NHS
Universal Credit has had many delays, it’s a bloody mess!

It’s ramping up homelessness and poverty too
This government do not care what it will put claimants through
Abolishing severe disability allowance
We must mount the campaign to stop it and show the government defiance

Data sharing your information, checking if the claimant is cheating
Left with little money, making stark choices between heating and eating
Online forms that are completely inaccessible
Universal Credit is totally incomprehensible

DWP have the nudge unit and behavior compliance
We now see National Charity Mind and DWP formed an alliance
Psycho Compulsion and forced treatment, to target those with Depression
Go to the job centre for 6 CBT sessions

Making disabled people attend the health and work conversation
If you Do not attend it; your money will be rationed
Work coaches with 3 weeks of training
The questions they will ask will be intensive and draining

Do you see friends, do you see family?
What can you do to keep your sanity?
Have you any hobbies, what are you strengths?
Claimants lives turned inside out, the DWP go to any lengths

Can only claim for 2 children, you can’t claim for more
The nasty rape clause in Universal Credit can see your jaw hit the floor
A woman to prove she has been raped, pushed to the edge can’t take anymore
You ask what the government are doing it for

The answer a simple one, to shrink the state
It is ideological, claimants they hate
They want everyone working, not claiming a thing
Causing destitution in the process and the chaos it brings

If claimants give up not claiming, so much the better
Keep harassing the claimants with those brown envelope letters
Stress the claimant and make them cry
Deny support to disabled people and hope many die

Universal Credit is a nasty system, yes it is true
It is harmful and hateful and will put people through
Punitive punishment and sanctions ramped up
Searching for work for 35 hours, so here is a heads up!

We need to stop and scrap Universal Credit
Yes you heard right and now have said it
Universal Credit is unfixable, it now needs to go
Let us campaign together united, and make it so!

A close friend of mine Anne Marie Gallager sums it up when she says:
So all my life and now as a pensioner (ps it’s not that great – an ill health occupational pension after working very hard for decades on not great pay but that’s what most of us everyday people do) I have paid and still pay direct and indirect taxes.

But all I see and hear now after 8 years of austerity for most of us too few staff in schools, hospitals, emergency services, libraries wanting to charge old women for space for a sewing group community centres chucking out the old domino players as they can’t pay, libraries barely open, so called free Wifi of terrible quality, charities etc having to jump through hoops to get funding from the lottery. Homelessness and destitution is growing. Universal credit is a disaster. Places like homes and centres for the elderly and Ryton – either closing or threatened with closure if they don’t become businesses.

You can’t profit from public services they are a way to create common good.
I did not and never will vote to treat the poor in an evil manner. We all need basics we can afford those who are fit need work, work that needs to be done is there in plain sight.

Chris Lowe another friend of mine sums this up eloquently when he says:
Take back control” was one of the slogans of the Leave campaign – but who was control being taken back from? Although a lot was said about letting Britain make her own laws again, attacks like this on the role of parliament in holding government to account suggest that MPs are not supposed to be taking back control themselves.

The language then and since has suggested that a liberal ‘elite’ are seen as attacking against the interests of the ‘British people’ and more in the interests of the EU. The referendum is referred to as the ‘British people’ expressing their will and MPs are supposed to follow that decision.

Yet this simplistic appeal to ‘the will of the people’ has more in common with dictatorial governments (remember most of those engineer elections to give themselves a false impression of democracy) than with our representative parliamentary system.

The Daily Mail seems to be getting more rabid in its attacks on elected representatives. This kind of attack on parliamentary process is damaging to trust in our democratic system, and is something that we should all be worried about.

The Daily Mail is run by a tax-dodging elite who have had more influence on British politics over the last 40 years than any of the MPs on their front page today. If we want to find an out-of-touch elite who do not understand or care about the struggles of the ‘British people’, we need look no further than the Daily Mail. These attacks on British democracy are not intended to help us, but rather to weaken us and open us up to further rape by tax-dodging multinationals.

Have to say that that the London Mayor(Sadiq Khan) hits the nail on the head by stating that a hard Brexit could lead to a lost decade of lower growth. He said a no deal outcome in which UK left both EU customs union and single market could cost the country half a million jobs and £50bn in lost investment by 2030. The finding came from research he had commissioned from  analysis Cambridge Econometrics and he called on the government to alter its strategy in talks with Brussels.

Here are some facts that the Leave campaign does not want to admit to such as see link below:

Ten things the EU has done for you
Europhiles and Eurosceptics can argue until the cows come home about whether membership of the EU brings more benefits or disadvantages.But both sides can agree that many, if not most, of the laws passed in the 27 member states stem from EU legislation.

To mark the 50th anniversary of the Treaty of Rome on 25 March, we note here 10 things the EU has done for the ordinary citizen.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/europe/6455879.stm

Here’s a song to sing along

Time to kick the Tories out, to the tune of John Brown’s body:

Chorus:  No more cuts to public services
No more cuts to public services
No more cuts to public services
It’s time to kick the Tories out

Universal credit’s not the welfare people need
It doesn’t fit the bill when there’s a family to feed
Six weeks to wait for money is a very long time indeed
And it’s time to kick the Tories out

Amazon and Google never pay their share of tax
They have their offshore havens where their millions are stashed
While thousands in our cities have no clothes upon their backs
And nowhere to lay their heads

They say that our prosperity depends on HS2
But libraries are closing and children’s centres too
I don’t think they’ll reopen when the train is coming through
At a cost of 56 billion pounds

It’s time to end austerity, it only causes stress
It’s time to build more houses and support the NHS
It’s time to end the pay cap for our nurses, teachers, YES!
It’s time to kick the Tories out

The Tories continue to fail young people on education, housing, employment and living standards. I can only conclude that a Labour government will scrap student fees, restore education maintenance grants & end the discrimination in the minimum wage.

This is in despite of all the gimmicks, the jokes and the distractions  today was a ‘nothing has changed’ Budget from an out-of-touch Government with no idea of the reality of people’s lives and no plan to improve them.

The Budget has confirmed what we already knew that we are worse off under the Tories and it’s set to get worse. Economic growth is the lowest since the Tories came to office, real wages lower than in 2010, and the failure to pause the botched roll-out of Universal Credit will cause real suffering. The Chancellor has completely lost the plot and failed to recognise the scale of the emergency in our public services and found no meaningful funding to address the crisis in our schools, hospitals or children’s services.

Make sure people know. Share the truth about this Budget now.

Labour would take a different approach and build an economy for the many, not the few. We would scrap the public sector pay cap for the whole of the public sector; pause and fix the Universal Credit roll-out; introduce a real living wage of at least £10 an hour by 2020 and an energy price cap. Together we can stand-up against this failed Tory Government. Get involved with an event near you this weekend. What a few weeks it’s been for the conservatives and one wonders if its business as usual for them as a growing number of MPs(Conservatives) are allegedly being investigated over their past conduct towards women. Let’s not forget an alleged conservative peer who is a tax dogger continue to make a large donations to the Conservative Party, what a lark. As usual austerity remains the mantra of the day or more of the same backstabbing shows its ugly face by the ranks of the backbenchers to sort out who will push the knife into Ice Queen( Theresa May).

So if people are honest and do work or care for others bring all the correct paperwork and documents they don’t get Universal Credit in 6 weeks if they are lucky if it’s 6 months from what I am getting to hear from close friends and others
This government is employing the Department Works and Pension to punish people and people are being made ill and will die. Like many people we did not did not vote for this and I doubt anyone else did. Poor people on low or no income will get into debt and despair.

It’s been alleged by the Resolution Foundation the loss of income due to benefit freezes would be in the sum of two hundred and twenty five pounds for a single parent in work and the chancellor of the exchequer should ease the squeeze on benefit household. Benefit freezes combined with the predictable raise in inflation could set some low-income households back three hundred pounds next year.

This smells of 1992- 1997 of the Conservative infighting and we all could see what happened then it was well come back to Labour all is forgiven in the guise of a spider called New Labour but on this occasion it will be in the form of “Oh Jeremy Corbyn Labour Government”. Oh where, oh where is Jess Phillips and others when we all need their loud gobs to crake the whip at the conservatives by shouting out “ Another one bites the dust”. Or even better throwing some rotten eggs at Theresa May come what may.

Our NHS is in a major crisis, as is social  services, ask anyone who works on the frontline and any patients waiting for treatment, or waiting to be transferred from hospital. Many hospitals have already stopped elective surgery to cope with the winter crisis, remember last year the humanitarian one declared by the Red Cross.

Even although their own NHS England chief has highly criticised them on lack of sufficient funding, the Chancellor has pledged £2.8billion for the health service in England, but only £350million of that will be available to hospitals this year!
Our NHS will get just £1.6billion extra in 2018/19 which is actually less than half the extra £4billion health chiefs have said is desperately needed.

Truth is as it was revealed earlier this month, sorry forgot where I read it,   that the UK is ‘suffering a significant drop in growth and productivity is stagnant, decimating tax receipts and government spending plans.’
The Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) stated that productivity   may have never recovered from the recession.

This in itself surely demonstrates the failure of Tory economic policy. Despite all those austerity measures where we all dutifully tightened our belts, with punitive pay caps and sanctions being enforced etc what has happened?

The debt is bigger than ever and our NHS, social services, welfare state and education etc all key drivers of economic recovery as they are investing in the people, are being made to fail.
It will be interesting to see what happens over the next year with the Brexit debacle thrown in the mix but for many I fear it will be a disaster, especially for our most vulnerable citizens.

Anger over Tory MP brexit hit list A Eurosceptic Tory MP has landed himself in hot water by writing compiling a hit list of university professors who teach Brexit subjects. It’s no surprise he received a fury reaction from the letter

According to Theresa May she has written to all EU citizens who resides in the UK here is a sample of the letter:

From:
Prime Minister’s Office
Ahead of EU Council, Theresa May wrote directly to EU citizens in the UK.

As I travel to Brussels today, I know that many people will be looking to us – the leaders of the 28 nations in the European Union – to demonstrate we are putting people first.

I have been clear throughout this process that citizens’ rights are my first priority. And I know my fellow leaders have the same objective: to safeguard the rights of EU nationals living in the UK and UK nationals living in the EU. I want to give reassurance that this issue remains a priority, that we are united on the key principles, and that the focus over the weeks to come will be delivering an agreement that works for people here in the UK, and people in the EU.

When we started this process, some accused us of treating EU nationals as bargaining chips. Nothing could have been further from the truth. EU citizens who have made their lives in the UK have made a huge contribution to our country. And we want them and their families to stay. I couldn’t be clearer: EU citizens living lawfully in the UK today will be able to stay.

But this agreement will not only provide certainty about residence, but also healthcare, pensions and other benefits. It will mean that EU citizens who have paid into the UK system – and UK nationals into the system of an EU27 country – can benefit from what they’ve put in. It will enable families who have built their lives together in the EU and UK to stay together. And it will provide guarantees that the rights of those UK nationals currently living in the EU, and EU citizens currently living in the UK, will not diverge over time.

What that leaves us with is a small number of important points to finalise. That is to be expected at this point in negotiations. We are in touching distance of agreement. I know both sides will consider each other’s proposals for finalising the agreement with an open mind. And with flexibility and creativity on both sides, I am confident that we can conclude discussions on citizens’ rights in the coming weeks.

I know there is real anxiety about how the agreement will be implemented. People are concerned that the process will be complicated and bureaucratic, and will put up hurdles that are difficult to overcome. I want to provide reassurance here too.

We are developing a streamlined digital process for those applying for settled status in the UK in the future. This process will be designed with users in mind, and we will engage with them every step of the way. We will keep the cost as low as possible – no more than the cost of a UK passport. The criteria applied will be simple, transparent and strictly in accordance with the Withdrawal Agreement.

People applying will not have to account for every trip they have taken in and out of the UK and will no longer have to demonstrate Comprehensive Sickness Insurance as they currently have to under EU rules. And importantly, for any EU citizen who holds Permanent Residence under the old scheme, there will be a simple process put in place to swap their current status for UK settled status.

To keep development of the system on track, the government is also setting up a User Group that will include representatives of EU citizens in the UK, and digital, technical and legal experts. This group will meet regularly, ensuring the process is transparent and responds properly to users’ needs. And we recognise that British nationals living in the EU27 will be similarly concerned about potential changes to processes after the UK leaves the EU. We have repeatedly flagged these issues during the negotiations. And we are keen to work closely with EU member states to ensure their processes are equally streamlined.

We want people to stay and we want families to stay together. We hugely value the contributions that EU nationals make to the economic, social and cultural fabric of the UK. And I know that member states value equally UK nationals living in their communities. I hope that these reassurances, alongside those made by both the UK and the European Commission last week, will provide further helpful certainty to the four million people who were understandably anxious about what Brexit would mean for their futures.

If you still want to be kicked between the legs by the Conservatives continue to vote Tories in the Local Government Elections 2018, if you want hope for a better future vote Labour to make a big difference in your ward.

Satire: Tories are in trouble again


Here is something to remember about Ice Queen May see youtube:

I have to say that the media have been very biased towards Jeremy Corbyn over the past three years he has received more than his share of bashing, but when it comes to subject such as Brexit it is alleged he is very vague I would beg to differ this is on the grounds of when Labour tries to put their message across to the press, the press who are the Tories friends will put a different spin on it which will put a damper on it which is why Ice Queen has gotten away with murder. A lot of people fear the various spin on Brexit which may bankrupt the country and you don’t have to be brainwashed by any media to feel this way. What a fracking joke, hey mates wake up and smell the very strong coffee the table has just turned on Theresa May for a change. Who remembers the Tories promise that they will be the party that will cap care home fees 2020.  Well it’s no surprise that Tories ditch plan to cap care home fees by 2020. An absolute disgrace, this means, in essence, anyone needing care could unless extremely wealthy, lose their home; they struggled for years to buy. This must be opposed, enough is enough.

Cough, cough, cough, cough, cough oh why, oh why did a spider called Jeremy Corbyn came along to disrupt Theresa May by handing Ice Queen May her P45 whilst she was in full flow of her speech Jeremy Corbyn claimed that this P45 was from Boris Johnson. He turn to Boris I have given the P45 to Theresa. The speech was to relaunch her career and assert her authority as leader. Indeed, it was a disaster, and Theresa May, maybe gone within days or months. She started to cough her way through a set of weak, rehashed policies which was cherry picked of Labour policies and in Labour manifesto some by Ed Miliband and Jeremy Corbyn. Strangely some of letters in the empty slogan behind her peeled off and fell to the floor.  In her conference speech the Prime Minister proposed to take just a few of our policies and heavily watering them down. That won’t work.

Check out this from youtube from a man that is very much liked

This will not come as a surprise to us remember two of Labour manifesto commitments to cap energy prices and build more council housing it transpires the conservatives were trying to outdo Labour by adopting labour policies have the Conservatives become the party for desperation to get social policies on their agenda that they end up announcing more u-turns by adopting Labour policies when it suits them Whilst I’m very happy for the conservatives adopting Labour policies at their conference at least give Ed Miliband and Jeremy Corbyn the credit where its due instead of claiming it’s a conservative policy, I’m sure people will remember Trade Union Congress and Labour’s Living Wage policy only for the Conservative to claim it was their policy.

The Tory plan to roll out universal credit across the country may be a good idea in principal and in theory. However if I was a teacher and I had to mark it out of ten I would give five out of ten. I would consider the timing of it to ascertain whether it was wrong as one side does not fit all to individuals each case should be on merits not all individuals can budget on a monthly base. The idea that workers gets paid on a monthly bases is great the government seemed to forgot that there workers that receive their pay on a weekly bases as well. I foresaw the former coalition government wanted the universal credit implemented forthwith which was ill-judged and cruel for this reason I will deduct five points for causing misery to many people who are on benefits and low pay workers depends on benefits to help them out with child care and have to wait up to six weeks to receive their payment as an average worker only waits for four weeks to receive their salary. Councils and housing associations are braced for a surge in rent arrears and evictions as the introduction of the dreaded Universal Credit come into force. See the link below:

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2017/oct/08/councils-fear-surge-in-evictions-as-universal-credit-rollout-accelerates?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Now folks here is the burning question who do you think will take over the leadership of the Conservatives and hold a General Elections. If they are not ready then move aside and let a Labour Government run the country.