My reflections on various national party leaders at their annual conferences


It’s time for Theresa May to recognise the catastrophic impact eight years of uninterrupted austerity has had on local services and communities. By 2020, councils will have lost 77 per cent of their budget, leading to infrastructural and social collapse. We have already seen huge increases in crime, foodbank usage and homelessness, alongside a decline in life expectancy. All are ‘inevitable consequences’ of the cuts. I’m happy to show my unconditional solidarity with 60 other politicians from the West Midlands to write to Mrs May demanding an end to her ruinous austerity.  Cuts have consequences and the people have had enough.

So glad that Theresa May has come to Birmingham and is so happy with life that she’s dancing to Dancing Queen while our residents have to deal with the impact of a horrendous amount of public service cuts. I couldn’t give a flying monkeys about her dancing style, I’m sure many people on the poverty line will give her lessons any day, I’d prefer if she actually opened her eyes to what everyone else is seeing. Get real.

Here are my reasons why I will not kiss and go into bed with the Libdems, Tories, and UKIP:

76 residents died Grenfell unnecessarily because the regulations here not adhere to for the tenants’ safety which happened under the conservatives.

The lack of justice for the Windrush Generation thousands of commonwealth citizens were recruited to work in Britain. Under the current Conservative government they are being denied visas, passports and permission to remain. Many BAME communities who served this nation of ours in two world wars and when Britain went all over the world to call on those communities to serve this empire they came with their families to work in our public services they felt a sense of belong now they threatened with deportation.

The continuation of private housing is being used by some unscrupulous landlords to maximize rents and if you can’t pay it’s a case of hit the highway. This government alleges that they are building more housing every year. Frankly this is only for the rich and not for the many but for the few.

The concept of universal credit rolled all the benefits into one sounds like a good on paper but in practice it’s not working and it’s hurting the very people who depends on it. The average working people who are working receives their pay every four weeks under the new benefit system the unemployed receives theirs every five weeks instead of fortnightly. They have to wait six weeks for it to be process in the meantime they can take out to cover it until it reaches your bank account. It’s no wonder why people who are just starting out on benefits felt they are being short changed. On a average month there is 31 days, in some there is 30 days in a month and one month there is 28 days.

Philip Hamilton announced there is more cuts to follow at the Conservative conference see details below:

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/philip-hammond-make-13billion-cut-13338183

I must say Bishop Welby hit the nail on the head and I dare anybody to challenge what he said is wrong at the TUC conference as I cannot see the Conservatives or DUP and Libdems putting this into action as the Libdems and DUP have lost credibility by jumping into bed with the Conservatives with their manifesto for the next general elections when it will be called. See article below:

https://www.archbishopofcanterbury.org/speaking-and-writing/speeches/archbishop-canterburys-speech-tuc

Thousands turn out in Birmingham to demonstrate against the Tory austerity plans as we all know that it is hurting and not working, as there is nothing left for future generations. Rather than running services into the ground we should keep public services public properly funded as a key asset. I fully concur with Sir Albert Bore analysts of the Jaws of Doom on the future of public services and how the delivery of councils has changed see article below:

https://www.birminghammail.co.uk/news/local-news/birmingham-could-stripped-bare-minimum-15184598

I’m minded to remind Parliamentarians, Councillors from all the political parties that people felt their vote are taking for granted and they cant see any difference to their pay packets, all they can witness is the cost of austerity, unsympathetic policies and lack of understanding for the plight faced by everyday people is ruining lives. Teenage suicides in England and Wales have increased by 67%, rough-sleeping nationally increased by 169% as trends continue with detrimental increases occurring since 2010. The damaged caused in less than a decade is absolutely staggering. So much for austerity one has to wonder if this government and establishment really care enough for our communities. Is it a case of I’m alright Jack I’m doing well, I don’t really care what happens to you I have a roof over my head and I pay my bills on time, I have a rich wife or I have a rich husband that can provide for me and my family.

The effect of the funding cuts to public service shows itself of a daily basis. Im not at all surprised that both Councillors and MPs regularly have complaints from local residents about prostitution, anti social behaviour, and lower level crime which the police simply do not have the resources to deal with. However more can be done to help their constituency to address this by not paying lip services residents want to see more action by our elected members to improve their quality of life not just for them but for their children’s future.

I say to this Conservative Government until the government starts to recognise the root causes of wastage of food, increase of food prices, food-banks, soup-kitchens, mobile bills for those on contract, utilities bills, and petrol. They should not pay lip services with people’s lives rather than tackling the root causes.

This grieves me my heart to constantly read in all National Press, Opposition Parties, Council Leaders and Think-tanks quotes council bosses in UK say the worst is yet to come in cuts to services as the government further reduces local government funding. The County Council Network predicts unpalatable cutbacks next year as the councils identify at least £1bn savings to plug a £1.5bn shortfall by 2020. It also warns the risk of some councils stripping their services back to minimum core offer is growing.

I must admit I do-not belong to any of the fan clubs within the Labour Party and I will praise the leadership when Labour get its policies right and when they get it wrong I will criticise them over our public services like I have done over the years under the leadership of John Smith, Neil Kinnock, Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, and Jeremy Corbyn. I do fancy Labour’s position on Public Services

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2018/sep/21/jeremy-corbyns-spending-plan-for-public-services-backed-by-majority?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Let’s talk about Brexit for a bit, as I know you’ve not heard enough about it recently. I know there are some people who voted Leave and as well as people who voted Remain this post is for everyone.

Firstly, let’s be clear, this is chaos right now. Theresa May has finally been told to her face that the EU rejects her plan. We all knew it was going to happen, but apparently she is incapable of taking a hint. She has spent 18 months negotiating with her own party and the DUP about what Brexit should look like, came up with a plan that nobody in her party (or the DUP) liked, and then tried to convince the EU that a plan with details they have said from the start wouldn’t work would actually work. Doomed. Utterly utterly doomed from the start. The only reason she managed to get this far is because the Tories are scared of a Labour led government and they don’t dare challenge her. There is now no credible plan and Macron has told the rest of the EU leaders that after waiting 18 months for the Tory party to finish negotiating with itself, enough is enough and the EU has to put its foot down.

Secondly, the lies about Brexit in the referendum. I’m just going to talk about one the lie told to the BAME community by the Leave: “Vote for Brexit and it will be easier for people from India, Pakistan, and China to get visas, work, marriage, joining family, etc it’ll be easier.” And at the same time the Leave campaign was saying that the UK had too much immigration, and the Tory party still has a policy of slashing immigration to 1/3 of current levels. The Leave campaign won the referendum based on lies, and we can see now that those were lies and can not be achieved.

Thirdly, as many people will be thinking “all politicians lie to win elections” well, in the UK yes, but that’s because our political system is broken and our politicians are crap. It is clear that the Westminster political class have failed. Theresa May became Tory leader because all the other candidates stepped down and she was the best of a bad bunch. The Labour party is internally divided as well, with Corbyn seemingly unwilling to hold the Tories to account on Brexit, and many MPs scared to challenge the government on Brexit because they think their voters will desert them. There is no organised opposition and government is led by incompetents. Our media have the lowest level of trust across Europe and are run by millionaires who believe that their job is to disseminate propaganda, rather than report the news. And the BBC is scared of losing their licence fee income. Our political system is broken and our politicians lie through their teeth because they know the press won’t hold them to account and the electorate have no other options.

The EU has been clear from day one what our options are:

We can stay members of the Single Market and Customs Union.

We can have a Canada+ deal, with Northern Ireland having a special status to stop       a hard border.

The EU has been clear that they can not permit the integrity of the Single Market to be threatened – this is not being stubborn, instead comes from a clear understanding that the Single Market must survive intact and there can be no cherry-picking of elements of it. The EU can not compromise because it would lead to the Single Market starting to unravel. Those two choices offered by the EU are both still open, but Theresa May has refused to accept them.

So we have a situation now where:

(1) We are 6 months away from the Article 50 deadline, with no alternative plan to the one just rejected (David Davis’ plan that he was working on hasn’t appeared).

(2) Our government is incompetent, led by a PM who refuses to compromise and faced by an opposition leader who doesn’t want to hold the government to account on Brexit. Neither of those leaders look like changing in the near future, nor is it clear who would replace them.

(3) Our government is propped up by the DUP, who will never accept the sensible option of giving Northern Ireland a special economic settlement with the EU (although they are happy with the special social policy settlement that Northern Ireland has).

(4) We have a media who demonise the EU to the extent that even people who voted Remain believe that the EU is failing to compromise. This is not true. I can not repeat this enough it is not true. The EU is protecting the integrity of the Single Market and the leaders of the member states are all on agreement on that point.

This is not a recipe for the careful political debate and compromise necessary to reach a Brexit agreement that the EU can sign up to. British politics has failed and because of that, there will be no agreement reached with the EU. We are incapable of making the hard choices necessary to achieve that we have spent the last 18 months locked in internal negotiations and we have failed to come to a decision without any internal agreement, there can be no possibility of negotiating externally.

Whether you voted Leave or Remain, you have to understand this the UK is incapable of carrying through on the results of the 2016 referendum.

That leaves us with two choices:

(1) Cancel Article 50 and accept that the UK will not leave the EU.

(2) Crash out of the EU with no deal and cause huge damage to the British economy.

The extremists and looters are looking forward to the second result Tory MPs who want to turn us into a tax haven beholden to money syphoned through corruption out of Russia and China. But crashing out will hit us harder than the 2008 global crash, and we have no Gordon Brown to stabilise the banking system this time.

Cancelling Article 50 is the only sensible way forward, if only because of how broken the UK’s political system is.

See some of the article which makes the cases why this government must change directions:

http://www.theweek.co.uk/96457/are-we-sleepwalking-into-another-financial-crisis?_mout=1&utm_campaign=theweekdaily_newsletter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/public-health-service-cuts-council-funding-labour-warn-jonathan-ashworth-a8547496.html

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/business/news/local-councils-finances-budget-cuts-austerity-services-national-audit-office-a8242556.html

https://www.ft.com/content/9c6b5284-6000-11e7-91a7-502f7ee26895

https://www.local.gov.uk/about/news/council-funding-be-further-cut-half-over-next-two-years-lga-warns

 

I have decided include all the three Leader speeches at this years annual conferences starting with:

Vince Cable Libdem annual conference speech in Brighton 2018

https://www.libdemvoice.org/vince-cables-speech-to-the-party-conference-in-brighton-in-full-58641.html

Gerald Batten UKIP annual conference speech in Birmingham 2018

https://youtu.be/55G888WDRpc

Jeremy Corbyn annual conference speech in Liverpool 2018

https://labour.org.uk/press/jeremy-corbyn-speaking-labour-party-conference-today/

Maybot Conservative annual conference speech in Birmingham 2018

https://www.conservativehome.com/parliament/2018/10/i-passionately-believe-that-our-best-days-lie-ahead-of-us-mays-conference-speech-full-text.html

 

 

 

Advertisements

A challenge to all the main political parties address Is


Nobody likes to lose their seats, but the harsh reality is that’s democracy via the voters. You can either build on it or wallow in self pity. The reason why I stress on this is most voters will look at the national issues instead of the local issues issue which affect their communities. I’m not saying that any local issue does not count, of course it matters. This is said without prejudice to my fellow campaigners. Sure it would be great to see Tory, Libdems, and Green heartlands turn to Labour, or in my case return to Labour. It’s highly noticeable that the press would rather dig up dirt on individual(s) instead of seeing what they can do for the community which they want represent.

The reality is whichever party is in government they will suffer losses in local government elections. According to the press, national parties, ie The Conservatives and Labour are neck and neck in points which judgement on this occasion I can agree with. However more can be done to improve Labour’s position as a Government in waiting and again I say this without prejudice as I don’t belong to any fractions in Labour but will admit I’m a proud member of the party. It is been said that a week in politics is a long time and I take into account that the public can be very fickle. They are more concerned with their bread and butter issues and sometimes they want to see more jam or marmalade on their bread. Sure we can bash the Conservatives as much as we all want for whatever reasons, but Labour needs to take some of the blame for problems communities they represent, I kid you not.

The electoral commission has said it would like powers to seize documents more quickly during investigations into alleged violations of electoral law. Officials from the elections watchdog told MPs they were currently able to obtain warrants and search premises and if needed seek a court order. But they said greater “immediacy” was needed when targeting other groups assisting high profile campaigners. There has been much talked about antisemitism in the Labour Party. It now transpires that the Conservatives have shot themselves in the foot because they are tarred with allegations of Islamophobia which the Muslim Council of Britain have researched and for which they have consistently demanded an investigation.there are more frequent incidents involving Tory candidates and representatives, and in an open letter MBC told the chairman Brendon Lewis he must ensure racists and bigots have no place in the Conservative Party.

Heck, even Baroness Waris has also waded into the Islamophobia debate and put added pressure to Theresa May to publicly acknowledge that Islamophobia is a problem in the Conservative Party. Parts of the party had been in denial about the issue and a clear statement was needed about what was to be done to tackle it.

Mohammed Amin( The Chairman of Conservative Muslim Forum) accused his party of failure to take action on Islamophobia and joined calls for an independent inquiry. The party was perceived as being Anti Muslim and had prioritised electoral concerns rather than talking decisive action.

To put the icing on the cake Boris Johnson( The Former Foreign Secretary) has landed himself in it again for writing in his column in a leading national newspaper  (Daily Telegraph) “Muslim woman wearing burkas look like letter boxes” and he also compared to looking like “bank robbers”. I don’t normally concur with the conservative leader and Prime Minister (Teresa May) but have to give her credit where it is due, she has said that the remarks have clearly caused offence See article below:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-45083275

I would further say all the political parties will have to get their act together to address Islamophobia, Racism, and Anti-Sememitism ASAP because without the voters to come out to vote there will be no political parties. When any political party gets its their policies right we should all praise it, but when they get their policies wrong we all should criticise it.

Whilst I acknowledge in Barnet, Labour lost the seat they hoped to win I believe the Conservatives need to get their own house in order as well it seems to me that racism is on the increase and the parties continue to pay lip service to combat it but voters cant see action. My message to them is stop playing the blame game and start to address the issue of Islamophobia, and Anti-Sememitism Let’s not forget that at one time when the Labour Party campaigned for BAME and religious minorities vote for the party, both Jewish and BAME voters came to their aidbecause they wanted a party to identify with. So they turned to Labour which had a proud record of representing them and have many Jewish and BAME Members of Parliament (MPs) and Councillors. There has been high profile reporting in all the major national press criticism of Labour Party not going far enough for not putting into action the full International Holocaust Alliance working definition of Racism, and Anti- Sememitism see link below:

https://www.holocaustremembrance.com/working-definition-antisemitism

Over the summer period the press had a field day by reporting that the Labour Party was Anti Semitic and there was demonstations outside Parliament and Labour Party Head Quarters. On Tuesday 4 September the Labour Party National Executives Committee has accepted the international holocaust remembrance alliance full definition of of anti-Semitism. Im sure that the press will express their views on the new postion of Labour Party and its members.

I like many others in the Labour Party would like the two state solution and want to see the return of Palestinians implemented between Palestine and Israel as soon as possible as this a Labour Party policy which has been agreed by the previous Labour Party NEC and Conference under the leadership of Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, and Ed Miliband, see details below

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two-state_solution

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palestinian_right_of_return

 

A simple challenge to all elected councillors and community leaders


A simple message and one should not be ignored see Youtube below:

This Tory government simply does not care about the many, but only for the few. They take no responsibility for the surge in the numbers of children living in poverty despite their own statistics showing 4.1 million children are now living in relative poverty compared with four million the previous year. Who drive through changes to welfare but then take no responsibility for the growing number of people dependent on food banks and left with nowhere else to turn. The Trussell Trust gave out a staggering 1.3m food parcels last year, up 13% on 2016-17. With the numbers of homeless and rough sleepers on the rise these are royal citizens that are better not seen nor heard. The Tory stronghold of Windsor has made sure of that. Saturday’s obscene display of wealth and pomp will see 100,000 tourists line the cobbled streets with rough sleepers cleared off them, unless of course they are camping out with union jack’s in hand does this rings a ring a bell to all or just some of us.

It’s no surprise that there are groups of adult who are working and are homeless they too have to depend on foodbanks and soup kitchens just to survive and they are heavily depending on using public facilities such as bathrooms to clean up just to go to work and they too are the forgotten lot. Notice how during the local elections how opposition candidates made last minute campaign which promises us the earth attacking our Labour Councillors and fail to mention the Tory Government massive cuts to our public services did not fool us. The voters were not bamboozled by glossy leaflets and unfeasible promises that appear out of the blue at election time.

Am I hearing or reading double dutch an apology from the queen of spin (Works and Pensions Secretary Esther McVey) for making inadvertently misleading statements in parliament about Universal Credit. This is the same woman who said it was working but failed to mention it was hurting. Well thanks to the National Audit Office for pointing out it was incorrect as it had reservations about the process. For those people who were forced to go onto universal credit spoke out but felt ignored by this government after explaining they had to wait five weeks to get any form of benefits which was also adding to the pressure on foodbanks, soup kitchens, and junk food projects. All the government could say that they could take out a sub which you had to pay back out of your benefits. If I’m honest I would love to see it work this is on the grounds of six benefits would have been rolled into one benefit. The previous system was broken and needed replaced to be more accountable and needed to be more manageable.

A charity (Buttle UK) said the government is failing to tackle bed poverty with thousands of children having to share with siblings or sleep on floors. They have helped more than 3,000 vulnerable families buy beds for their children last year. It fears thousands more across the UK may lack a bed of their own, leading to problems concentrating in schools. It has written to politicians in 10 areas.

This government is starving councils as well as people of taxpayers cash it does make the job of running a council almost impossible. Lots of legal requirements on councils which they do not have the resources to meet the demand. There are money plenty of it in rich peoples bank accounts here and off shore. Historically councils came  about so good ideas like water and gas and electric could be for all this government is intent on totally reversing that . So we lose playing fields  we focus only on tests and we lose youth services and sports clubs( at school because teachers are too knackered).Instead councils allows lots of cheap takeaways to open, increase of speeding traffic and the government that brought you this have some pissing proposals.

Damian Hinds (Education Secretary) said in a speech it is a scandal that some children start school unable to speak in full sentences and if children reach year 1 unable to read simple words they rarely catch up the gap just widens. He has pledged to halve the number of pupils starting school behind in early talking and reading skills by 2028. His speech comes across as being desperate and in my opinion is more of an talking shop with less action which needs more meat on the bone.

Young people not in education, employment or training (NEET), UK: May 2018
There were 808,000 young people (aged 16 to 24 years) in the UK who were not in education, employment or training (NEET); this number increased by 14,000 from October to December 2017 and was up 8,000 when compared with January to March 2017.The percentage of all young people in the UK who were NEET was 11.5%; the proportion was up 0.2 percentage points from October to December 2017 and up 0.3 percentage points from January to March 2017.

Of all young people in the UK who were NEET, 39.9% were looking for work and available for work and therefore classified as unemployed; the remainder were either not looking for work and/or not available for work and therefore classified as economically inactive. There is a few things that I have to get off my chest which is the recent Ward Boundary changes this was instigated by the behest of a Conservative Government in the hope of increasing their voters base which has caused a all up elections in some parts of the UK. The cuts in public services funding which affects the flow of local services and have to say what a cheek for them to mention that they are the government that are investing more money to improving public services since they came to office as if by magic at the dark corner of the wall a money tree grew. Am I really missing a trick or two they can promise the Democratic Union Party(DUP) incentives for a confidence and supply vote in Parliament. Oh it’s okay to use spin blame Labour for everything that the conservatives perceive that they deemed to be under pressure.

A BBC report quotes the Trades Union Congress (TUC) as saying that the UK’s real wage squeeze will be the worst in modern history and the slowest for 200 years. Wages have lagged behind inflation since 2008 and are worth £24 less in real terms than in 2008 and the situation is unlikely to change for the good until 2025.

We can no longer sit back and allow the Tories to fail our young people. We’ve got a plan to rebuild our youth services. Here is a challenge to all newly elected Councillors and Community Leaders “ Dare to Struggle, dare to win”

This is an open invitation to all Councillors to come visit two projects that are self funded in Birmingham to see what it is like from a service users point of view why they have to depend on Foodbanks, Real Junk Food Projects and Soup Kitchens. feel free to take a tour to the two projects:

To make an appointment The Real Junk Food Project Birmingham the address and opening times  can be found on link below:

https://www.list.co.uk/place/20027380-ladywood-community-centre-birmingham/

Contact: Anne Marie Gallagher  07708146849

To make an appointment Homeless Heroes Soup Kitchen address and opening times can be found on link below:

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/place/10+New+Bartholomew+St,+Birmingham/@52.4796809,-1.8910932,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x4870bc869e4cd0c1:0x4202f7353b0c7ad4!8m2!3d52.47968!4d-1.888907?hl=en

10 New Bartholomew St, Birmingham B5 5QS,

Contact person: Javed Iqbal 07971888736

 

Aside

Sixty Church of England bishops along with leaders of other religious groups, are urging ministers to rethink the two-child benefits cap.

In a letter to the Times, they say the policy is likely to tip an extra 200,000 children into poverty.

Changes limiting some benefits to the first two children in a family came into effect last year.

The government says parents on benefits should face the same financial choices as those in work.

Under the current rules, parents can claim child tax credits or universal credit only for their first two children unless there are special circumstances.

Campaigners say the policy could leave some families almost £3,000 a year worse off.

Among the signatories to the letter are senior representatives from Jewish and Muslim groups as well as other Christian organisations.

They include:

  • The new Bishop of London, the Right Reverend Sarah Mullally
  • Harun Khan, secretary general of the Muslim Council of Britain
  • Gillian Merron, chief executive of the Board of Deputies of British Jews.

They write: “It is a grave concern that there are likely to be mothers who will face an invidious choice between poverty and terminating an unplanned pregnancy.”

They warn that the policy “conveys the regrettable message that some children matter less than others, depending on their place in the sibling birth order”.

They suggest that many families will have taken decisions on family size while they were still earning enough to support their children but may now have to claim benefits because of redundancy, bereavement or illness.

The Right Reverend Paul Butler, Bishop of Durham, said: “A combination of low pay, unstable jobs and high housing and living costs are locking families in a daily struggle to put food on the table.

“It is simply not right that some children get support and others don’t.

“We share a moral responsibility to make sure that everyone in our country has a decent standard of living and the same chances in life, no matter who they are or where they come from.

“The government has an opportunity to right this wrong by removing its two-child limit policy. We urge the prime minister to address this burning injustice.”

A report published with the letter by the End Child Poverty Coalition, Child Poverty Action Group and the Church of England says the policy’s full impact has yet to be seen.

Some 160,000 families with new-born babies are already up to £2,780 a year worse off than if their youngest child had been born in the previous year, says the report.

And, from February 2019, the two-child limit will also apply to families with three or more children who make a new claim for universal credit, irrespective of when their children were born.

By 2020, an estimated 640,000 families, including around 2 million children, will be affected, it adds.

Child Poverty Action Group chief executive Alison Garnham said the link between need and benefit entitlement had been broken by the policy.

“A year in, the government should reconsider this policy before more families are pulled below the poverty line.”

Borrowed this from a friend from Pam Briggs on Facebook which makes lots of sense.

This is one of the worst governments in recent years. They are pushing cuts on the poorest in society.. and those who bust their gut working a full week for minimum wage.. while rewarding themselves with a decent pay rise…. and sadly, they don’t see this as a problem. May has no issue with it, because she doesn’t care.. all she wants is to lead the conservatives, and she will do whatever it takes to keep her party happy.. and when you are surrounded by men who have lived a life of privilege since birth.. they simply don’t have a clue about everyday life for the majority of people, you have a government that ‘thinks’ it is doing okay…. until poverty gets so bad and we end up in another recession… and still they think it is all good.. only it isn’t.

I mean, given the government are spending more money on sanctioning people than it costs to pay those people their bloody benefits you have to wonder where their brains are? While sneaking in hefty cuts to working people through universal credit, the cuts that were voted against because it was going to cause severe poverty to a lot of families… because wages are so damn low compared to the cost of living.

I just don’t get how anyone can support this government.

The children of today are our future of tomorrow as the saying goes however this government continues to fail our children future by not addressing child poverty. It’s been purported by the press children are filling their pockets with food in day and age welcome back to the Victorian age or to the time of Oliver Twist during the period of poorhouse. According to Child Poverty Action Group and National Education Union survey extreme child poverty is getting worse across Britain and schools are having to help take care of children. Schools are regularly providing sanitary products, buying shoes and coats and even giving families emergency loans. Since 2012 the Conservatives have cut spending on children’s services by almost £1 Billion. This has left vulnerable children and families struggling without the services they need – like essential Sure Start Centres which have been closing down at an alarming rate. While slashing support for those that need it most, the Tories have been dishing out tax breaks for the privileged few at the top. This has to change.  We’ve got a plan to properly fund our children’s services – it’s time the Tories listened. See links below:

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/education/education-news/child-poverty-headteachers-schools-teachers-national-education-union-neu-austerity-a8283956.html

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/apr/03/parents-will-not-forgive-funding-cuts-national-education-union-conference-leader-warns

https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/mar/31/schools-funding-crisis-swing-election-teachers-union-conference-neu-nasuwt

Please read and sign link below:

https://action.labour.org.uk/page/s/stop-slashing-funds-for-vulnerable-children

Oh dear here is another u-turn from the conservatives who were adamant they will force though to cut housing benefits for under 21. The conservatives says one thing then when they cant get their wicked way they implement Labour policies, you cant trust them on welfare. Labour position is to reinstate housing benefits to under 21.  see link below:

https://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/entry/housing-benefit-axed-18-21-year-olds-dwp-damian-green_uk_58b99db8e4b0d2821b4dcc6e

https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/politics/tory-minister-admits-benefit-cuts-12276278

Sure Start children’s centres in England have closed in the remaining centres service for families are “hollowed out and no longer within pram-pushing distance”. The report says 3,632 centres with official data showing 509 of those have now closed but it says it is an underestimated. A shortage of special needs funding means growing numbers of children are being left without suitable school places. Official statistics showed 4,050 special needs pupils were without a place in 2017 in England. It’s a disgrace that pupils are sent home because council are being starved of funds for them.

Oh Conservatives, Oh Conservatives, Oh Conservative Govt, when will you learn that food, energy, council tax, rent, water, tv license, MOT, soup kitchens and food banks, continue to increase, voters are asking themselves where are their hard earn tax money going to under the Conservative Government. Voters are facing hardship to make ends meet whilst they don’t see an increase in their salary in real terms and all they read in the press about is austerity. This government penalize ordinarily working people just for making ends meet and they are saying where is the justice in it. The conservatives are adamant that they are the party for the working class, but in reality they strongly favor their fatcat millionaire friends to bail them out by digging very deep in their heavy pockets by pretending to care about us lay a-bouts who think they who them something in return they continue to drop a few more crumbs of the table in the full knowledge that they are hoodwinking voters by dangling a carrot in front of them and if you seen the advert on television about purchasing a razor the customer complains about the price and cashier mentions about the free gift comes with it only for him to be punched between the legs and face that’s how it feels from the Conservatives.

Conservatives say they are the party of public services in reality they are the party of cuts and you have finally twig on that they are cutting the bobbies on the beat, and  Local Government are expected to maintain statuary services on the cheap then have the cheek to say “We are all in it together”. This is Thatcherism at its best comes to mind under Cameron and May since Maggie Thatcher forced thorough compulsory competitive tendering(CCT) on to councils, there has been a sharp decrease in our beloved public services which be privatized by them. We will no longer recognize public services as we once knew it once was in the next 15 years. This government would rather have the American style of services ran by American style mayoral positions to rid it from central government which is bad news to put it in the hands of mayors to decide which service can make a profit to be sold off to the private sector.

After having analyzing the pros and cons of the conservatives policies I can only come to the conclusion that they don’t care about our children’s future they are the party for big businesses and toff nose and I urge all to vote for change vote Labour in the Local Elections 2018

Don’t trust Conservatives to run our public services which side are you on public or private sectors


The chancellor or the prime minister could not give a flying monkeys if our growth goes up or down as long as they get pay cheque paid into their bank account(s) every month complements of the taxpayers and in return public service workers gets kick between the legs with less pay increase and more cuts to public services. The lower your income the more you will get smacked in the face with further increases in food, and energy prices and mobile bills which pushes people to join longer queues outside the foodbanks and junk food projects to feed their families just to make ends meet.

Who remembers who Ice Queen Theresa May first speech outside 10 Downing Street, here is the full speech she made:

I have just been to Buckingham Palace, where Her Majesty The Queen has asked me to form a new government, and I accepted.

In David Cameron, I follow in the footsteps of a great, modern Prime Minister. Under David’s leadership, the government stabilised the economy, reduced the budget deficit, and helped more into work than ever before.

But David’s true legacy is not about the economy but about social justice. From the introduction of same sex marriage,  to taking people on low wages out of income tax altogether; David Cameron has led a one-nation government, and it is in that spirit that I also plan to lead.

Because not everybody knows this, but the full title of my party is the Conservative and Unionist Party, and that word ‘unionist’ is very important to me.

It means we believe in the Union: the precious, precious bond between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. But it means something else that is just as important; it means we believe in a union not just between the nations of the United Kingdom but between all of our citizens, every one of us, whoever we are and wherever we’re from.

That means fighting against the burning injustice that, if you’re born poor, you will die on average 9 years earlier than others.

If you’re black, you’re treated more harshly by the criminal justice system than if you’re white.

If you’re a white, working-class boy, you’re less likely than anybody else in Britain to go to university.

If you’re at a state school, you’re less likely to reach the top professions than if you’re educated privately.

If you’re a woman, you will earn less than a man. If you suffer from mental health problems, there’s not enough help to hand.

If you’re young, you’ll find it harder than ever before to own your own home.

But the mission to make Britain a country that works for everyone means more than fighting these injustices. If you’re from an ordinary working class family, life is much harder than many people in Westminster realise. You have a job but you don’t always have job security. You have your own home, but you worry about paying a mortgage. You can just about manage but you worry about the cost of living and getting your kids into a good school.

If you’re one of those families, if you’re just managing, I want to address you directly.

I know you’re working around the clock, I know you’re doing your best, and I know that sometimes life can be a struggle. The government I lead will be driven not by the interests of the privileged few, but by yours.

We will do everything we can to give you more control over your lives. When we take the big calls, we’ll think not of the powerful, but you. When we pass new laws, we’ll listen not to the mighty but to you. When it comes to taxes, we’ll prioritise not the wealthy, but you. When it comes to opportunity, we won’t entrench the advantages of the fortunate few. We will do everything we can to help anybody, whatever your background, to go as far as your talents will take you.

We are living through an important moment in our country’s history. Following the referendum, we face a time of great national change.

And I know because we’re Great Britain, that we will rise to the challenge. As we leave the European Union, we will forge a bold new positive role for ourselves in the world, and we will make Britain a country that works not for a privileged few, but for every one of us.

That will be the mission of the government I lead, and together we will build a better Britain.

If you ask the ordinary Joe Blogs out in the real world they would say the conservatives are not the party for the working class they are more for the rich and they have their finger in every pie and they will shaft you as soon as they get what they want form you. Look at what they did to the coal miners and manufacturing industries.

It is highly noticeable that childcare vouchers have been put on hold by six months by conservative ministers with the full support of bed partners DUP helped to secure voting against Labour motion here is the list of conservative and DUP who proudly voted against the opposition motion see names below: 

Here is the list of MPs who voted against the motion:

Conservative (304)

Adams, Nigel
Afolami, Bim
Afriyie, Adam
Aldous, Peter
Allan, Lucy
Allen, Heidi
Amess, Sir David
Andrew, Stuart
Argar, Edward
Atkins, Victoria
Bacon, Mr Richard
Badenoch, Mrs Kemi
Baker, Mr Steve
Baldwin, Harriett
Barclay, Stephen
Baron, Mr John
Bebb, Guto
Bellingham, Sir Henry
Benyon, rh Richard
Beresford, Sir Paul
Berry, Jake
Blackman, Bob
Blunt, Crispin
Boles, Nick
Bone, Mr Peter
Bottomley, Sir Peter
Bowie, Andrew
Bradley, Ben
Bradley, rh Karen
Brady, Sir Graham
Brereton, Jack
Bridgen, Andrew
Brine, Steve
Brokenshire, rh James
Bruce, Fiona
Buckland, Robert
Burghart, Alex
Burns, Conor
Burt, rh Alistair
Cairns, rh Alun
Cartlidge, James
Cash, Sir William
Caulfield, Maria
Chalk, Alex
Chishti, Rehman
Chope, Sir Christopher
Churchill, Jo
Clark, Colin
Clark, rh Greg
Clarke, rh Mr Kenneth
Clarke, Mr Simon
Cleverly, James
Clifton-Brown, Sir Geoffrey
Coffey, Dr Thérèse
Collins, Damian
Costa, Alberto
Courts, Robert
Cox, Mr Geoffrey
Crabb, rh Stephen
Crouch, Tracey
Davies, Chris
Davies, David T. C.
Davies, Glyn
Davies, Mims
Davis, rh Mr David
Dinenage, Caroline
Djanogly, Mr Jonathan
Docherty, Leo
Donelan, Michelle
Double, Steve
Dowden, Oliver
Doyle-Price, Jackie
Drax, Richard
Duddridge, James
Duguid, David
Duncan, rh Sir Alan
Duncan Smith, rh Mr Iain
Dunne, Mr Philip
Ellis, Michael
Ellwood, rh Mr Tobias
Eustice, George
Evans, Mr Nigel
Evennett, rh David
Fabricant, Michael
Fallon, rh Sir Michael
Fernandes, Suella
Field, rh Mark
Ford, Vicky
Foster, Kevin
Fox, rh Dr Liam
Francois, rh Mr Mark
Frazer, Lucy
Freeman, George
Fysh, Mr Marcus
Garnier, Mark
Gauke, rh Mr David
Ghani, Ms Nusrat
Gibb, rh Nick
Gillan, rh Dame Cheryl
Glen, John
Goldsmith, Zac
Goodwill, Mr Robert
Gove, rh Michael
Graham, Luke
Graham, Richard
Grant, Bill
Grant, Mrs Helen
Grayling, rh Chris
Green, Chris
Green, rh Damian
Greening, rh Justine
Grieve, rh Mr Dominic
Griffiths, Andrew
Gyimah, Mr Sam
Hair, Kirstene
Halfon, rh Robert
Hall, Luke
Hammond, rh Mr Philip
Hammond, Stephen
Hancock, rh Matt
Hands, rh Greg
Harper, rh Mr Mark
Harrington, Richard
Harris, Rebecca
Harrison, Trudy
Hart, Simon
Hayes, rh Mr John
Heald, rh Sir Oliver
Heappey, James
Heaton-Harris, Chris
Heaton-Jones, Peter
Henderson, Gordon
Herbert, rh Nick
Hinds, rh Damian
Hoare, Simon
Hollingbery, George
Hollinrake, Kevin
Hollobone, Mr Philip
Holloway, Adam
Howell, John
Huddleston, Nigel
Hunt, rh Mr Jeremy
Hurd, rh Mr Nick
Jack, Mr Alister
James, Margot
Javid, rh Sajid
Jayawardena, Mr Ranil
Jenkin, Mr Bernard
Jenkyns, Andrea
Jenrick, Robert
Johnson, rh Boris
Johnson, Dr Caroline
Johnson, Gareth
Johnson, Joseph
Jones, Andrew
Jones, rh Mr David
Jones, Mr Marcus
Kawczynski, Daniel
Keegan, Gillian
Kennedy, Seema
Kerr, Stephen
Knight, rh Sir Greg
Knight, Julian
Kwarteng, Kwasi
Lamont, John
Lancaster, rh Mark
Leadsom, rh Andrea
Lee, Dr Phillip
Lefroy, Jeremy
Leigh, Sir Edward
Letwin, rh Sir Oliver
Lewer, Andrew
Lewis, rh Brandon
Lewis, rh Dr Julian
Liddell-Grainger, Mr Ian
Lidington, rh Mr David
Lopez, Julia
Lopresti, Jack
Lord, Mr Jonathan
Loughton, Tim
Mackinlay, Craig
Maclean, Rachel
Main, Mrs Anne
Mak, Alan
Malthouse, Kit
Mann, Scott
Masterton, Paul
May, rh Mrs Theresa
Maynard, Paul
McLoughlin, rh Sir Patrick
McPartland, Stephen
McVey, rh Ms Esther
Menzies, Mark
Mercer, Johnny
Merriman, Huw
Metcalfe, Stephen
Milling, Amanda
Mills, Nigel
Milton, rh Anne
Mitchell, rh Mr Andrew
Moore, Damien
Mordaunt, rh Penny
Morgan, rh Nicky
Morris, Anne Marie
Morris, David
Morris, James
Murray, Mrs Sheryll
Murrison, Dr Andrew
Neill, Robert
Newton, Sarah
Nokes, rh Caroline
Norman, Jesse
O’Brien, Neil
Offord, Dr Matthew
Opperman, Guy
Parish, Neil
Patel, rh Priti
Pawsey, Mark
Penning, rh Sir Mike
Penrose, John
Percy, Andrew
Perry, rh Claire
Philp, Chris
Pincher, Christopher
Poulter, Dr Dan
Pow, Rebecca
Prentis, Victoria
Prisk, Mr Mark
Pritchard, Mark
Pursglove, Tom
Quin, Jeremy
Quince, Will
Raab, Dominic
Redwood, rh John
Rees-Mogg, Mr Jacob
Robertson, Mr Laurence
Robinson, Mary
Rosindell, Andrew
Ross, Douglas
Rowley, Lee
Rudd, rh Amber
Rutley, David
Sandbach, Antoinette
Scully, Paul
Seely, Mr Bob
Selous, Andrew
Shapps, rh Grant
Sharma, Alok
Shelbrooke, Alec
Simpson, rh Mr Keith
Skidmore, Chris
Smith, Chloe
Smith, Henry
Smith, rh Julian
Smith, Royston
Soames, rh Sir Nicholas
Soubry, rh Anna
Spelman, rh Dame Caroline
Spencer, Mark
Stephenson, Andrew
Stevenson, John
Stewart, Bob
Stewart, Iain
Stewart, Rory
Streeter, Mr Gary
Stride, rh Mel
Stuart, Graham
Sturdy, Julian
Sunak, Rishi
Swayne, rh Sir Desmond
Swire, rh Sir Hugo
Syms, Sir Robert
Thomas, Derek
Thomson, Ross
Throup, Maggie
Tolhurst, Kelly
Tomlinson, Justin
Tomlinson, Michael
Tracey, Craig
Tredinnick, David
Trevelyan, Mrs Anne-Marie
Truss, rh Elizabeth
Tugendhat, Tom
Vaizey, rh Mr Edward
Vara, Mr Shailesh
Vickers, Martin
Villiers, rh Theresa
Walker, Mr Charles
Walker, Mr Robin
Wallace, rh Mr Ben
Warburton, David
Warman, Matt
Watling, Giles
Whately, Helen
Wheeler, Mrs Heather
Whittaker, Craig
Whittingdale, rh Mr John
Wiggin, Bill
Williamson, rh Gavin
Wollaston, Dr Sarah
Wood, Mike
Wragg, Mr William
Wright, rh Jeremy
Zahawi, Nadhim

Democratic Unionist Party (10)

Campbell, Mr Gregory
Dodds, rh Nigel
Donaldson, rh Sir Jeffrey M.
Girvan, Paul
Little Pengelly, Emma
Paisley, Ian
Robinson, Gavin
Shannon, Jim
Simpson, David
Wilson, rh Sammy

Independent (1)

In further development Theresa May has been officially rebuked for misleading MPs and the public over false claims that the government is providing an extra £450m in funding to local police forces in 2018/19.

The chair of the UK Statistics Authority, Sir David Norgrove, ruled on Tuesday that the claim made by May repeatedly at prime minister’s questions last month “could have led the public to conclude incorrectly” that the government was providing an extra £450m for police spending over the next financial year.

Labour MPs are expected to try to challenge May over her misleading statements about police funding at prime minister’s questions on Wednesday.

The shadow police and crime minister, Louise Haigh, who made the complaint to the statistics watchdog, said that in fact there had been a “flat cash” settlement for police forces in England and Wales that actually amounted to a cut in direct Whitehall grants to the police in real terms. Haigh said the “extra £450m” would only be found if police and crime commissioners pushed through an increase to council tax to raise £270m. About £130m of the £450m is to go directly to “national police priorities” rather than local forces and a further £50m is to be provided for counter-terrorism funding.

The prime minister’s claim that local police force budgets were being boosted by £450m was repeated by Home Office tweets and in a letter sent out by Andrea Leadsom, the leader of the House of Commons.

“We have commented in the past about statements on police funding and emphasised the need for greater precision in the way numbers are used,” Norgrove told Haigh in his response to her complaint.

“In terms of the particular points you make, the prime minister’s statement and the Home Office’s tweet could have led the public to conclude incorrectly that central government is providing an additional £450m for police spending in 2018/19.

“The Home Office tweet also implied that the £450m sum is guaranteed. As the minister for policing’s statement outlined, up to £270m of the funding settlement will come from local council tax, if police and crime commissioners and mayors choose to raise these sums. In addition, the leader of the House of Commons stated that the £270m that can be raised locally was on top of the overall settlement of up to £450m,” wrote Norgrove.

The statistics watchdog said complex funding arrangements were difficult to explain in the “time compressed context” of PMQs but said the Home Office did not face this constraint in its tweet. He suggested the Home Office’s head of statistics made sure his colleagues understood the structure of police funding and the importance of making clear public statements.

Haigh called for the PM to apologise. She said: “The Tories are not being straight with the public on police funding and now they have been found out. See article below:

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2018/mar/20/theresa-may-accused-of-misleading-public-over-extra-police-funding

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/nov/09/britains-police-budgets-to-lose-700m-by-2020-amid-rising

Council tax bills on the up. Public services neglected, outsourced, privatised. People are being let down by their local authorities across the country, and they are acutely aware of it. Whether their council is controlled by Labour or Tories, it’s likely that in May they’ll put the blame where it belongs – with the Tory government.

Over the last eight years, council budgets have been reduced by 50 per cent. The cuts aren’t evenly distributed either, with the most deprived local authorities actually being hit by deeper cuts than the rest.

The Local Government Association says children’s services need £2bn to plug the funding gap. Faced with a surge in demand, councils are having to surpass their budgets to protect children at immediate risk of harm.

Of course each problem is connected. A family becomes homeless and gets placed in temporary accommodation, maybe a single room in a hostel. The children have no space to do their homework, so their performance at school declines. They’re tired; there is drug-taking and anti-social behaviour in the building and the police are called out regularly. Their mother’s mental health worsens, she start taking anti-depressants.

I truly don’t mean to sound glib – I’m describing a situation that I encountered many times as a parliamentary caseworker. One isolated event, like a private landlord serving its tenants with an eviction notice, leads to pressure on housing, welfare, emergency services, health, education, and so on.

As Corbyn says, the May elections are a chance for people to send a clear message: “enough is enough”. See article below from Sienna Rodgers LabourList

https://labourlist.org/2018/03/pay-more-for-less-under-the-tories/

How can you trust the Conservatives to run our beloved public services when the UK’s new homelessness minister has told the Guardian she does not know why the number of rough sleepers has increased so significantly in recent years. Heather Wheeler said she did not accept the suggestion that welfare reforms and council cuts had contributed to the rise.

On a visit to a housing project in Glasgow, Wheeler said she remained “totally confident” she would not have to act on her pledge to resign should she fail to meet the Conservative manifesto commitment of halving rough sleeping by 2022, and eradicating it by 2027. “We’re going to move heaven and earth to get that done,” she promised. See article below:

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/mar/18/homelessness-minister-heather-wheeler-rough-sleeping-housing-first

The question still remains who do you trust to run our public services I say “Don’t trust Conservatives to run our public services which side are you on public or private sectors” If you are thinking to vote Conservatives and care about Public services then the Conservatives is not the party for you. If you want a better future want to see improvements in services to public services then I would strongly suggest that you vote for Labour on 3 May to improve public services.

 

More bad news for Conservatatives


In some parts of the country there will be no doubt be local government elections owing to the ward boundary changes this was the Conservative Government doing not Labour as they would love to spin it as it was labour’s fault. Think of it this way if you like or dislike marmite it’s more of the taste that left in your mouth under the conservatives in a nutshell to ensure that all the main political parties don’t have a overall majority or they want to create a return of a two horse race in politics. There is no doubt people will have heard of the government austerity plan which continues to affect local services by implementing cuts. Yet the government expects local services to continue to run smoothly with the cuts to public services. Some people are turning to foodbanks, soup kitchens, junk food projects on the grounds of being on low incomes or they have had a sanction on their universal credit for various reasons which leaves a nasty sting in your throat. Both the government and press loves to play the blame game to target immigrants to avoid addressing the real issues which they fail to mention that food, prescription, and energy prices are increasing this includes rail and plane fares. Families struggling to make ends meet will be hit by the biggest annual benefits cut for six years, according to a new analysis that exposes the impact of continuing austerity measures on the low paid.

It’s alleged that Chancellor Philip Hammond is preparing to give a stripped-down spring statement where he is expected to boast of lower than expected borrowing figures. He will use them to suggest Britain has reached a “turning point”. He will point to forecasts showing the “first sustained fall in debt for a generation” to claim “there is light at the end of the tunnel” in turning around Britain’s finances. The cuts will affect around 11 million families, including 5 million of the struggling families that the prime minister stated she would focus on. It is further alleged that there will also be some good news for the low paid, with more than 1.5 million workers set to benefit from a 4.4% pay rise when the national living wage increases from £7.50 to £7.83 at the start of April. However, that measure will be outweighed by the effective £2.5bn cuts to working-age benefits. While there were bigger cuts in 2012 when child benefit was removed from higher earners, this year’s squeeze will fall on low- and middle-income families. The new analysis suggests these families are set for an average loss of £190 this year alone, though some will be far worse off. There are four key benefit cuts this year. Working-age benefits will be frozen for a third year, saving £1.9bn and affecting almost 11 million families. The 3% real-terms cut in working-age benefits this year will be by far the biggest of the freeze, set to last four years. A measure limiting benefit claims to a family’s first two children, costing up to £2,780 for a family having a third child, saves £400m this year and affects 150,000 families. The withdrawal of the family element of support for new tax credit and universal credit claims from families with children will cost families up to £545. It saves the public purse £200m this year and will affect 400,000 families.

Finally, the rollout of the controversial universal credit system, which combines several benefits into one payment, saves £200m because some claimants have lower entitlements compared with the existing system, especially the long-term sick and working families. It comes just days after Paul Johnson, head of the respected Institute of Fiscal Studies, warned that Britain was nowhere near out of austerity. Theresa May’s alliance with the DUP is facing fresh criticism after it emerged that the Government is set to protect Northern Ireland from free school meal cuts due to be imposed on poor children in England. The cuts planned for England stand in sharp contrast to the situation in Northern Ireland, where children of the “working poor” will get stronger protection. In legislation due before MPs today, English families on universal credit will see the income threshold for free school meals slashed to £7,400 a year. But in Northern Ireland, where the Government has just taken direct control of spending budgets, the same threshold for eligibility will be nearly double that rate, at £14,000. Theresa May already faces claims that she has “bought” the Democratic Unionist Party’s support with a pledge of £1bn in extra funds for Northern Ireland, at a time when the rest of the UK continues to suffer from Tory austerity.

I don’t have a problem with city councils charging customers to use their council parking facilities but it must be proportionate but what residents strongly object to is when people from outside use residential car parking bays which is for the residents those people are denying the residents the use of their car parking space or outsiders parking on the pavements blocking wheelchair users and pedestrians access to the pavements they have to walk around the badly parked cars which is a constant nightmare and communities should take back control of their residence car parking by having a residential parking schemes in their area like what they do in some parts of the UK. It’s been purported in the daily mail of increased car parking charges for some local authorities to plug holes in their budget. Motorists face steep hikes in parking charges to plug holes in council budgets. Car park spaces and residents’ permits will cost up to 45 per cent more. Some town halls are bringing in fees on Sundays to catch shoppers and churchgoers. Householders are already facing an above-inflation rise in council tax next month, with bills expected to go up by as much as £100 for the average property. A number of local authorities are in extreme financial difficulties with much of the pressure coming from the rising cost of social care.

The Government has been accused of “papering over the cracks” after it announced a new funding formula for schools that will see budgets fall in real terms and which “does nothing” to reverse cuts that have already been made. Tory cuts are starving schools of the funding they need to deliver a first-class education. Crippling underfunding across our city is driving up class sizes and forcing schools to cut corners. Justine Greening, the former Education Secretary, said schools will be given a funding rise of 0.5 per cent per pupil next year and a 1 per cent increase in 2019-20. The most under-funded schools will see their budgets rise by 3 per cent. Ms Greening announced last July that an additional £1.3bn will be invested in primary and secondary education. However, the rise for most schools is lower than the current 2.9 per cent rate of inflation, meaning it equates to a funding cut in real terms. The former Education Secretary also made no mention of any plans to reverse previous cuts to school budgets, which Labour said have totalled £2.7bn in real terms since 2015. Under the new National Funding Formula, primary schools will receive a minimum of £3,500 per pupil and secondary schools will get £4,800. Announcing the changes, Ms Greening told MPs: “This is an historic reform. It means, for the first time, the resources that the Government is investing in our schools will be distributed according to a formula based on the individual needs and characteristics of every school in the country.”  “Addressing these simple but damaging inequalities will represent the biggest improvement in the school funding system for decades.”

Britain’s housebuilding sector shrank at its sharpest pace on record at the start of the year, according to official figures.

The 9% downturn was the biggest month-on-month fall shown by data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) going back to the start of 2010.

It contributed to a bigger-than-expected decline for the wider construction sector, which contracted by 3.4% – the largest since June 2012.

The setback is likely to come as a disappointment for ministers seeking to boost the number of homes.

There was speculation that the demise of construction giant Carillion may also have hit the figures. The ONS said it could not comment on the impact of individual firms.

Samuel Tombs, chief UK economist at Pantheon Macroeconomics, said: “Rising interest rates and Brexit uncertainty are proving to be a toxic combination for the construction sector.”

Howard Archer, chief economic advisor to the EY ITEM Club, said: “The volatility of this sector suggests some bounceback is likely, although the recent bad weather presents a downside risk.”

Official figures also showed the manufacturing sector – which has been buoyed recently by the strength of the global economy and the weakness of the pound – only managed a rise of 0.1%, though it was the ninth month in a row of expansion.

GDP grew by just 1.7% last year – the slowest of the G7 advanced economies.

The slowdown has been attributed to the Brexit vote, which saw a collapse in the pound, driving up inflation and squeezing household spending, as well as creating business uncertainty seen as weighing on investment.

The Conservatives are braced for big losses in May’s local elections, after a poll found that few voters in London believe the party’s claim that its councils can spend less but still provide high-quality local services. The survey, commissioned by former Conservative treasurer Lord Ashcroft, suggests only three in ten voters in the capital see the Conservatives as the party of low council tax. A mere 18% believe Tory-run boroughs deliver on the promise of lower bills and better service. It will nevertheless make worrying reading at Conservative HQ, where analysts believe it may reflect a nationwide trend.

When I look into the conservative policies I’m more than convinced that there is more bad news for them in the form of a meltdown for them and I’m more incline too urge all to vote Labour on the 3 May in local elections 2018

 

Conservative panic over Housing crisis for Local Government Elections 2018


Just before declaring a snap general elections Theresa May had a majority in government she thought she would not win and toyed with the idea of courting her knight and shining in armour Vince Cable to save her party if there was another hung parliament but as if by magic a tree appeared in her office with money glowing in a dark corner of her office in 10 Downing Street. She wanted more power thinking Vince Cable would be so gullible to accept but only for him to turn down her proposition of marriage on the grounds of that a divorce proceedings would be within a year and did she think he had muggings written on his forehead after what happened in the last coalition.

Theresa May decided to turn her affections towards on her second best choice to be her sweetheart and husband to be Jeremy Corbyn. She declared I have a confession to make to you my sweetheart I want to marry you oh Jeremy Corbyn for more power in Parliament but after a few drinks of port she had a change of heart then contacts Jeremy Corbyn to say I have to break my engagement to you as you’re a vegan and I’m a meat eater. Jeremy Corbyn replies “Theresa there is no love lost between us I’m here to serve my country as your government continues with the dreaded austerity plan that hits the lowest paid this includes people with disabilities and mental health this will end in divorce, nothing you say will gain my trust in you and I rather stick to my principles thank you”.

After deciding to call for a snap general elections Theresa May lost her majority her affections and attention moved towards to her third and last choice Arlene Foster who was so gullible who decided to agree to a honey trap of an arranged marriage in return to pour some magic money tree in her favourite country called Northern Ireland and a further agreement of a confidence and supply vote in parliament not withstanding Ice Queen Theresa May laughing at her and trying to stab Arlene Foster in the back at the same time over brexit.

Sajid Javid (Housing Secretary) issued a stern warning to councils in England failing to build enough new homes could be stripped of planing powers. Councils will be told how many homes a year they must build and a failure to do so will see independent inspectors step in and he will be breathing down the necks of local authorities to ensure targets is met. It’s very rich of this government trying to addressing the housing issue and forgetting about homelessness and rough sleepers when they had 8 years to deal with it and not failing to mention it increased in UK by 162 percent this doesn’t address sofa-surfing and people staying in hostels. Poverty and Housing experts say that this appalling raise has been caused by crude government cuts to Housing Benefits a fall in investment in affordable homes reduced funding for homelessness services and a refusal to help private tenants. The bedroom tax and Universal Credit are making matters worse.

Theresa May and Sajid Javid are both living on cloud coco-land it’s alleged income inequality has been reduced since 2010 what planet are they living on they really need to smell the coffee they fail to recognize it has increased on their watch by offering people long-term solution of three year tenancies.  That is not long-term this does not resolve any problems.  The main cause of the present housing shortage is the right to buy.  Like many of us we are frustrated that as tenants we will never be able to live in London because of high house prices. Not many could not afford to buy or rent in London and tenants are being forced out to other regions.

No doubt the conservatives will carry on playing the blame game by saying that the previous government had 13 years to address it under their watch. If you check the records homelessness and rough sleepers increased when the coalition came into power under the austerity plan introduced by David Cameron and George Osborne by using the sound bite of the time which was the “ Big Society followed by We’re All In it Together”. They conveniently seem to have short memories came to mind so I take no lessons from this government introduced the right to buy scheme and failed to build more council housing.

Here is the full transcript of Theresa May speech:

On my first day as Prime Minister, I spoke on the steps of Downing Street about my desire to make this a country that works for everyone.

A country where, regardless of where you live, your race or religion, or what your parents do for a living, you have a fair chance to get on and build a life for yourself and your family.

It’s a philosophy that shapes everything this government does, and, over the past 18 months, we’ve done much to help turn vision into reality.

We’re reforming schools, colleges and universities so that all children and young people get the education that’s right for them.

We’re addressing failures in the justice system, making it more transparent so that racial disparities can be identified and ironed out.

We’re raising the national living wage, increasing the income tax personal allowance, and capping energy bills so that people are able to keep more of the money they’ve worked so hard to earn.

And, as I said at Mansion House on Friday, we’re negotiating a Brexit deal that works for the whole of the UK, so that nobody feels they have been left behind.

It’s all about making this country a fairer place for all, breathing fresh life into the British dream that every generation has a better future than the last.

But we cannot fulfil that dream, we cannot bring about the kind of society I want to see, unless we tackle one of the biggest barriers to social mobility we face today: the national housing crisis.

The causes and manifestations vary from place to place but the impact is all too clear: in much of the country, housing is so unaffordable that millions of people who would reasonably expect to buy their own home are unable to do so. Others are struggling even to find somewhere to rent.

The root cause of the crisis is simple. For decades this country has failed to build enough of the right homes in the right places.

It’s a problem that has plagued successive governments of all colours since post-war housebuilding peaked under the first Wilson administration.

But it was from the mid-1990s that the failure to match demand with supply really began to push prices upwards. In 1997, the average home cost 3.5 times the average wage. By 2010, that ratio had more than doubled.

Higher prices brought with them higher rents, so prospective first-time buyers found themselves able to save less and less even as the size of the deposit they needed grew and grew.

The result is a vicious circle from which most people can only escape with help from the Bank of Mum and Dad. If you’re not lucky enough to have such support, the door to home ownership is all too often locked and barred.

Talking to voters during last year’s election campaign, it was clear that many people, particularly younger people, are angry about this.

Angry that, regardless of how hard they work, they won’t be able to buy a place of their own. Angry when they’re forced to hand more and more of their wages to a landlord to whom their home is simply a business asset. Angry that, no matter how many sacrifices they make to save for a deposit, they’ll never be able to compete with someone whose parents have released equity from their own home to help their children buy.

They’re right to be angry. Income inequality is down since 2010, thanks in part to increases in the personal allowance and the National Living Wage. But wealth inequality continues to rise. And, as figures such as Matthew Rognlie argue, it is housing wealth – unearned, and offering huge returns – that lies at the heart of this growing disparity.

But the impact of rising prices goes beyond the simple division between housing haves and have-nots. This crisis of un-affordability is also creating a crisis of almost literal social immobility.

Think of the skilled, experienced worker who is offered a promotion but can’t afford to take it up because it would mean moving to a town or city where he can’t afford to live.

Think of the talented young woman from a working-class background who can’t afford to take an entry-level professional job because she wouldn’t be able to live nearby.

It’s not so hard to accept that door-opening internship in London if your parents own a large house in central London. It’s a much greater challenge if you share a room with your siblings in a North Wales terrace.

So the shortage of housing in this country reinforces inequality. It prevents social mobility and stops people fulfilling their potential. It creates and exacerbates divisions between generations and between those who own property and those who do not.

And it undermines something more, something less tangible but just as important. The sense of community, of belonging, of responsibility that comes with owning your own home or having an affordable, secure, long-term tenancy.

I still vividly remember the first home that I shared with my husband, Philip. Not only our pictures on the walls and our books on the shelves, but also the security that came from knowing we couldn’t be asked to move on at short notice.

And because we had that security, because we had a place to go back to, it was that much easier to play an active role in our community. To share in the common purpose of a free society.

That is what this country should be about – not just having a roof over your head but having a stake in your community and its future. All that is put at risk by the mismatch between housing supply and housing demand and the soaring prices that have resulted.

Now, this Government is already taking action to help hard-pressed buyers. We’re putting an extra £10 billion into Help to Buy, giving another 135,000 families a step up the property ladder. We’re scrapping stamp duty for 80 per cent of first-time buyers, and looking at ways to make the whole process of buying and selling homes quicker, easier and cheaper.

But to stop the seemingly endless rise in house prices, we simply have to build more homes – especially in the places where un-affordability is greatest.

Doing so requires action on many fronts, and at the very heart of the matter is the planning process. Planning professionals may not be as visible as the bricklayers and carpenters and roofers. But we cannot build the homes we need without them.

Because if there’s one thing I learned from my time working on housing at Merton Council, it’s that good planning is all about detail. It’s very easy for a politician to stand up and say he or she will build however many homes in however many years. But it’s an empty promise if they don’t also address the hundreds of smaller issues that underpin it.

Where in the country will they be built? In which communities? On what sites? What kind of homes will they be? What infrastructure will be needed to support them? Will these plans be imposed from above, or will local people have a say on what happens in their area?

These are the kind of questions that need to be answered by anyone who is serious about getting homes built. They’re the kind of questions that are asked every day by planning professionals. And they’re the kind of questions this government is answering with the new, fairer, more effective planning rules that we’re launching today.

When used incorrectly, as was the case for so many years, planning policy creates barriers to building, tying up councils in red tape and allowing developers to game the system. But in the right hands it can be a powerful tool with which to shape, regulate and drive the construction of homes in this country.

So this government is rewriting the rules on planning. With the major overhaul being published today, we’re giving councils and developers the backing they need to get more homes built more quickly. More homes at prices that are affordable for first-time buyers. More homes for the NHS staff, teachers, firefighters and other key workers on whom all communities depend. More homes for rent on family-friendly, three-year tenancies.

We’re streamlining the planning process, so that much-needed homes aren’t held up by endless appeals and bureaucracy.

We’re making it easier for neglected and abandoned commercial sites to be turned into housing.

And we’re making sure councils do all they can to find sites, grant planning permissions and build homes. That includes creating a nationwide standard that shows how many homes authorities need to plan for in their area – making the system fairer and more transparent.

Our new rules will also see to it that the right infrastructure is in place to support such developments. When people oppose large-scale development in their area, it’s often because they’re worried their village or town simply won’t be able to bear the weight of hundreds of new arrivals.

Their schools are already full, their roads are already congested, the waiting list at their GP is already too long. They want to know that any new homes will be accompanied by appropriate new facilities and infrastructure.

Under our new planning rules, that’s exactly what will happen. And local communities will be put at the heart of the planning process by seeing to it that all areas have an up-to-date plan.

Yet we must not lose sight of the fact that planning for the homes we need is not the same as building the homes we need. After all, families can’t live in a planning permission. A well-designed local plan won’t keep your children safe and warm at night.

The reforms driven forward under our last Prime Minister led to a great and welcome increase in the number of planning permissions granted. But we did not see a corresponding rise in the number of homes being built.

All that is changing.

The Secretary of State for Housing, Sajid Javid, along with his ministerial team and their officials, are doing incredible work in tackling failings at every level of the housing sector.

And I’ve taken personal charge of meeting the housing challenge, leading a task-force that brings together ministers and officials from every corner of Whitehall to attack the crisis on every front.

Because, while planning reform is part of the answer, all the evidence shows that just reforming planning and expecting the existing developers to build all the homes we need is pie in the sky.

Of course they have a clear and vital role to play, but the government must also step in homes are going to get built.

So we’re committing at least £44 billion of capital funding, loans and guarantees to support our housing market. We’ve changed the rules so authorities facing the greatest affordability pressures can access the finance they need to build more council homes for local people.

We’ve given Homes England a more muscular, proactive role in the process of site assembly, bringing together patches of land to create a coherent site suitable for development.

We’re investing in innovative modern construction methods that get more homes built more quickly.

The £5 billion Housing Infrastructure Fund has already made its first awards, investing almost £900 million in the roads, cycle paths, flood defences and other essential works that will allow for the construction of up to 200,000 homes that would otherwise not get built.

And we’ve put an additional £1.5 billion into the Home Building Fund, helping smaller developers deliver homes that don’t attract finance from the private sector. As one builder put it after finishing a development in Derbyshire: “The banks were very sceptical and very unhelpful. The Home Building Fund finance made all the difference.”

The results are clear. In 2016/17 net additions to England’s housing supply reached some of the highest levels seen for a generation. More than 217,000 homes of all types and tenures providing a place to live for couples, families and individuals right across the country.

The number of people buying their first home has reached its highest level in more than a decade: 365,000 last year, with an average age of 30.

Yet there remains much to do. The gap between permissions granted and homes built is still too large. The new, fairer planning rules we’re publishing today will help to close it. But it’s also time for builders and developers to step up and do their bit.

The bonuses paid to the heads of some of our biggest developers are based not on the number of homes they build but on their profits or share price. In a market where lower supply equals higher prices that creates a perverse incentive, one that does not encourage them to build the homes we need.

Oliver Letwin is currently reviewing the causes of the planning permission gap. If he finds evidence of unjustifiable delay, I will not rule out any options for ending such practices.

That may include allowing councils to take a developer’s previous rate of build-out into account when deciding whether to grant planning permission. I want to see planning permissions going to people who are actually going to build houses, not just sit on land and watch its value rise.

Where councils are allocating sufficient land for the homes people need, our new planning rulebook will stop developers building on large sites that aren’t allocated in the plan – something that’s not fair on residents who agree to a plan only to see it ignored.

And, by ending abuse of the “viability assessment” process, we’re going to make it much harder for unscrupulous developers to dodge their obligation to build homes local people can afford.

The Government will make sure land is available for homes and make sure our young people have the skills needed to build them. In return, I expect developers to do their duty for Britain and build the homes our country needs.

Public investments in infrastructure and schemes such as Help to Buy have provided a real boost to house builders. If they want that to continue, they will have to raise their game.

But that doesn’t have to mean destroying the country we love.

This is not an overcrowded nation. Only around 10 per cent of England has been built on. We are not faced with a zero-sum choice between building the homes people need and protecting the open spaces we treasure.

That’s why the answer to our housing crisis does not lie in tearing up the Green Belt. Barely 13 per cent of this country is covered by such a designation, but it serves a valuable and very specific purpose.

Not protecting beautiful scenery, unique wildlife or accessible landscapes. For that we have National Parks, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, heritage coastline and more. Indeed, our new planning rules also include stronger protections for ancient woodland and historic coastlines everywhere.

No, the defining characteristic of Green Belt land is not its beauty or its greenness, but its openness. Green Belts exist not to preserve landscapes but to prevent urban sprawl. That is what they were created for in the 1950s and that is the valuable purpose they still serve today.

Where cities surrounded by Green Belts still need more homes, we can increase housing density, make better use of brownfield sites, build upwards rather than outwards.

Our new planning rules make it easier to do this, allowing for minimum densities around transport hubs and city centres so that more homes can be built in areas with the highest demand.

They also support conversions of empty spaces over shops and upward extensions, allowing planners to make the most efficient use of available space and helping families to extend their homes.

Planning rules already say that Green Belt boundaries should be changed only in “exceptional circumstances”. But too many local authorities and developers have been taking a lax view of what “exceptional” means. They’ve been allocating Green Belt sites for development as an easy option rather than a last resort.

To prevent this, we’re strengthening existing protections so that authorities can only amend Green Belt boundaries if they can prove they have fully explored every other reasonable option for building the homes their community needs.

In the handful of cases where land does have to be removed, councils and developers will have to find ways to offset the impact.

And our 25-year environment plan commits us to leaving the natural environment in a better state than we found it. So we’ll expect any development, whether in the Green Belt or outside it, to look first at sites that have previously been built on rather than opting immediately for virgin countryside.

I’d rather see an ugly, disused power station demolished and replaced with attractive housing than a wood or open field concreted over – even if the former is in the Green Belt and the latter is not.

This concerted action, in planning and beyond, will get more homes built and bring home ownership back within the grasp of ordinary people.

But while ownership is a wonderful thing, there is nothing inherently wrong with renting your home. More than a third of English households rent at present, and almost all of us will do so at some point in our lives – I know I have.

Yet the tragedy of Grenfell Tower shone a spotlight on experiences shared by too many tenants. The fire took place in a local authority tower block, but the stories we’ve heard from the people who lived there – concerns not being acted on, voices not being listened to, needs being ignored – were all too familiar to tenants in all kinds of homes across the country.

Whether you’re renting by choice or necessity, you’re not any less of a person for doing so and you should not be treated as such. But the rise in houses prices has helped create a rental market in which bad practice can flourish, where people can be exploited, and where tenants are all too often seen as an inconvenient commercial necessity rather than as individuals with rights and needs.

Private landlords play an important role in the housing market. Talk to tenants, however, and you’ll repeatedly hear complaints that people are paying more and more for less and less. So this government is taking action to clean up the rental market and bring down the cost of renting.

Too many tenants have got used to being hit with rip-off fees by letting agents, facing huge upfront bills to check references or sign contracts. That’s simply not fair, so we’re banning letting agents from charging most tenants any fees at all.

Families face being uprooted every six months when their leases expire, so we’re working to make longer tenancies the norm.

Rogue landlords have been flouting rules that protect tenants’ rights and safety. So we’ve given local authorities new powers to crack down on such behaviour, and we’re backing legislation that will ensure all rental properties are fit for human habitation.

With no regulation in property management, the door has been open to cowboy agents – with tenants, leaseholders, freeholders and honest agents all paying the price. That’s why we’re working with reputable property managers and their clients to clean up and regulate the sector.

Our new planning rules encourage providers to build more homes specifically for rent, so supply goes up and rents come down.

And, later this year, our social housing green paper will look at what more can be done to ensure everyone living in social housing is treated fairly.

Whether in the private or social sector, renting your home should be affordable, safe and fair – and I’m working hard to make sure that’s the case.

Just as Grenfell highlighted failings in parts of the housing sector, so the tragic deaths of rough sleepers have reminded us of the plight of those forced to live on the streets.

And let me take this opportunity to thank the thousands of council staff, charity workers, volunteers and members of the emergency services who have done so much to help rough sleepers during the recent cold weather.

In 2018, in one of the world’s largest, strongest economies, nobody should be without a roof over their head. This isn’t just a British problem – in recent years homelessness has risen across Europe – but it is source of national shame nonetheless.

That’s why we pledged in our manifesto to halve rough sleeping by 2022 and eliminate it altogether by 2027. We’ve already committed £1 billion to help bring this about, and are piloting the Housing First approach in three of our great cities to see how it can work in this country.

We’re also implementing the Homelessness Reduction Act, to help more people sooner. We’ve changed the rules around funding so local government can use £400 million to help prevent homelessness, instead of just responding to it. And we’ve changed the law so councils can place families into private rented accommodation – meaning they get a safe, secure suitable place sooner.

But it’s not just about housing. Homeless people often have complex needs, so we’re taking unprecedented action across the board to help address them.

Here in London, 47 per cent of rough sleepers have mental health needs. That’s why we’re spending record levels on mental health support.

Forty four per cent need help to overcome alcoholism, so we’re spending around £200 million on treatment for alcoholism every year.

And 35 per cent need help for drug misuse, which is why our new Drug Strategy will protect the most vulnerable and help them turn their lives around.

There’s undoubtedly more to do. But we’re taking action that will make a real difference.

Because this is a government that isn’t afraid to uncover and face up to challenges. And that’s exactly what we’re doing with homelessness, and with the wider housing crisis.

More than 70 years ago, Anthony Eden told the world that “the ownership of property is not a crime or a sin, but a reward, a right and a responsibility that must be shared as equitably as possible among all our citizens.”

This country agrees with him. For decades after, home ownership steadily grew as more and more people acquired and passed on not just a patch of land but a stake in their communities, a piece of our shared society.

Yet ownership peaked in 2003. With prices rising and affordability falling, we became a nation where buying your own home went from a shared aspiration to a distant dream. Where rising rents led to an increasingly rootless population. Where housing wealth coalesced in the hands of those lucky enough to be on the property ladder, creating division, increasing inequality and undermining communities.

The British dream is about each generation being better off than the last, but today’s young people are forced to spend three times more of their income on housing than was the case for their grandparents.

The picture we see today is the result of many failures by many people over many years. Fixing it won’t happen overnight. But the size of the challenge is matched only by the strength of my ambition to tackle it.

More home ownership. A rental market that works for tenants. Greater fairness for all.

That is what the people of this country need.

That is what will make this a society that truly works for everyone.

And, as Prime Minister, that is what I am determined to deliver.

Whilst I concur it sounds very good with their new found sound bite on housing I can’t help thinking that there is Local Government elections on 3 May 2018 the Tory Government are in panic mode they seem to have forgotten they have cut funds to councils across the UK am I missing a trick or two here. Housing continues to be the problem of both successful governments. No doubt it still comes across as a talking shop and less action. Let’s see more action from this government it is highly noticeable this government has a very good track record of u-turns on a number of their so called policies since they have taken office. I have to say it needs more meat on the bone and is a feeble measure being proposed.

I’m afraid I’m not convinced of the proposal on housing and I would urge all to vote Labour on 3 May 2018